Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 401 - Introduction to Psychology

Credits: 4

Psychology as a behavioral science; its theoretical and applied aspects. Includes research methods, behavioral neuroscience, sensation and perception, cognition, learning, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology. To experience actively the nature of psychological research students have an opportunity to participate in a variety of studies as part of a laboratory experience.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

PSYC 401H - Honors/Introduction to Psychology

Credits: 4

Psychology as a behavioral science; its theoretical and applied aspects. Includes research methods, behavioral neuroscience, sensation and perception, cognition, learning, development, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology. To experience actively the nature of psychological research students have an opportunity to participate in a variety of studies as part of a laboratory experience.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

PSYC 402 - Statistics in Psychology

Credits: 4

Design, statistical analysis, and decision making in psychological research. Probability, hypothesis-testing, and confidence intervals. Conceptualization, computation, interpretation, and typical applications for exploratory data analysis (including measures of central tendency, variability), t-tests, correlations, bivariate regression, one-way analysis of variance, and chi square. Introduction to computer methods of computation. No credit for students who have completed ADM 430; BIOL 528; ADMN 420; EREC 525; HHS #540; MATH 439; MATH 539; MATH 644; SOC 502. Special fee.

Attributes: Quantitative Reasoning(Disc)

PSYC 402H - Honors/Statistics in Psychology

Credits: 4

Design, statistical analysis, and decision making in psychological research. Probability, hypothesis-testing, and confidence intervals. Conceptualization, computation, interpretation, and typical applications for exploratory data analysis (including measures of central tendency, variability), t-tests, correlations, bivariate regression, one-way analysis of variance, and chi square. Introduction to computer methods of computation. No credit for students who have completed ADM 430; BIOL 528; ADMN 420; EREC 525; HHS #540; MATH 439; MATH 539; MATH 644; SOC 502. Special fee.

Attributes: Quantitative Reasoning(Disc)

PSYC 440A - Honors/Understanding the Human Brain

Credits: 4

First, we will examine the evolution of the brains of hominids to understand what are characteristics are uniquely human and what are conserved across species. We then explore selected topics in neuroscience that alter neural functioning, for example, the impact of neuro-prosthetics, cognitive enhancement, racial discrimination. Finally, we will discuss the benefit and limitations of using animal models to understand human neural functioning.

Attributes: Biological Science(Discovery)

PSYC 502 - Research Methods in Psychology

Credits: 4

Research design, including experimental and correlation design; internal versus external validity; measurement; writing a research report; graphic and statistical methods for summarizing data; sampling; and special problems such as experimenter effects, reactivity of measurement, and others. The use of hypothesis testing and data analysis in research. Prereq: PSYC 401 and PSYC 402. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 511 - Sensation and Perception

Credits: 4

The study of how humans (and some other animals) sense and perceive their environment. Topics include seeing (vision), hearing (audition), tasting (gustation), smelling (olfaction), feeling (somatosensation), and the variety of state-of-the-art methods used by psychologists to study these senses. Illusions and other sensory and perceptual phenomena are treated. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 512 - Psychology of Primates

Credits: 4

A comparative analysis of primate cognitive, linguistic, and social processes. The origins of human behavior are explored from the perspectives of history, evolution, and contemporary work in neuropsychology, linguistic, sociobiology, and related fields. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 513 - Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 4

The study of human cognition, its basic concepts, methods, and major findings. Human knowledge acquisition and use. Attention, perception, memory, imagery, language, reading, problem solving, and decision making. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 521 - Behavior Analysis

Credits: 4

Principles derived from the experimental study of human and animal learning and their theoretical integration. Respondent and operant conditioning. Reinforcement and punishment, stimulus control, choice and preference, conditioned reinforcement. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 522 - Behaviorism

Credits: 4

Introduction to behaviorism as a philosophy of science. Some historical background, but concentration on modern behaviorism as exemplified in the works of B. F. Skinner. No credit for students who have completed PSYC 722. Offered only in Manchester. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 531 - Psychobiology

Credits: 4

Introduces the behavioral neurosciences. Surveys research conducted by psychologists to learn about the biological basis of behavior: development, sensation, perception, movement, sleep, feeding, drinking, hormones, reproduction, stress, emotions, emotional disorders, learning, and memory. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 552 - Social Psychology

Credits: 4

Behavior of individuals as affected by other individuals, groups, and society. Topics include attitude change and social influence, conformity, social interaction, interpersonal attraction, impression formation, research. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 553 - Personality

Credits: 4

Major theories, methods of assessment, and research. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 561 - Abnormal Behavior

Credits: 4

Causes, diagnosis, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Implications of varying theoretical viewpoints. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 571 - Pioneers of Psychology

Credits: 4

An introduction to the development and evolution of psychology as an academic discipline and applied science. The lives and works of innovators in psychology are placed in socio-political context.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

PSYC 571H - Honors/Pioneers of Psychology

Credits: 4

An introduction to the development and evolution of psychology as an academic discipline and applied science. The lives and works of innovators in psychology are placed in socio-political context.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

PSYC 581 - Child Development

Credits: 4

The developing child in the context of his/her society. Current problems in, and influences on, development of the child. Personality and cognitive development; exceptional children. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC #582 - Adult Development and Aging

Credits: 4

A life-span developmental framework for the study of growth, decline, and stability on adult development. Developmental methods in adult development research; biological basis for aging; patterns of change and stability in diverse domains of psychological functioning, e.g., perception, cognition, intellectual performance, and personality organization. Prereq: PSYC 401. (Offered only in Manchester.)

PSYC 591 - Special Topics

Credits: 4

New or specialized courses are presented under this listing. Staff present material not normally covered in regular course offerings. May repeat but not duplicate content. Prereq: PSYC 401.

PSYC 595 - Applications of Psychology

Credits: 1-4

Arranged by the student or offered by psychology faculty for supervised field, academic, or research experience related to psychology. A) Field experience: supervised internship at a business or human services setting, B) Academic experience: specialized classroom experience or supervised teaching assistance, C) Research experience: supervised research experience or laboratory work. Psychology instructors sponsor academic credit for appropriate experience combined with a relevant academic component. Requires a signed learning agreement prior to registration. Prereq: permission. May be taken for 1-4 credits in a semester and repeated to a maximum of 8 credits total. Cr/F.

PSYC #702 - Advanced Statistics and Research Methodology

Credits: 4

A review of basic statistics from Psychology 402 and 502 . Covers partial correlation, factorial ANOVA, and other analyses that include multiple predictor variables. Appropriate for students who plan to apply to research-oriented graduate programs, those who use statistics in honors thesis research, and those who plan to work in areas such as marketing or survey research. Topics covered are appropriate for use in psychology, sociology, education, medicine, and other research areas. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; or permission. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 705 - Tests and Measurement

Credits: 4

Testing intelligence, creativity, achievement, interests, and personality. Test construction; evaluation; relation to psychological theory, research, and practice. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502;/or permission.

PSYC 705H - Honors/Tests and Measurements

Credits: 4

Testing intelligence, creativity, achievement, interests, and personality. Test construction; evaluation; relation to psychological theory, research, and practice. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502;/or permission.

PSYC 710 - Visual Perception

Credits: 4

The study of how humans (and some other animals) see. Topics include color vision, depth perception, form and pattern vision, visual learning and development, eye movements, diseases of the visual system, illusions, and other visual phenomena. Prereq: PSYC 402, PSYC 502, PSYC 511, or PSYC 531; or permission. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 712 - Psychology of Language

Credits: 4

Theories of language structure, functions of human language, meaning, relationship of language to other mental processes, language acquisition, indices of language development, speech perception, reading. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 512; or PSYC 513; or permission. Special fee.

PSYC 712W - Psychology of Language

Credits: 4

Theories of language structure, functions of human language, meaning, relationship of language to other mental processes, language acquisition, indices of language development, speech perception, reading. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 512; or PSYC 513; or permission. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 713 - Psychology of Consciousness

Credits: 4

Explores questions of consciousness What is it? How does it develop? Are infants and animals conscious? Why did consciousness evolve? Includes a review of historical background, including the ideas of Jaynes, Paiget, James, Freud, and others. Contemporary topics may include the role of language and other representational systems, blindsight, subliminal perception, priming and other implicit cognitive phenomena, hypnosis, confabulation and attribution, dreaming, multiple personality and conceptions of self and free will, from simultaneous perspectives of phenomenology, behavior, and neuroscience. Specific topics governed by class interests. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 512; or PSYC 513; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 716 - Cognitive Neuroscience

Credits: 4

Cognitive Neuroscience is a rapidly expanding scientific discipline that probes classical questions of human cognitivepsychology via a broad array of cutting-edge methodological approaches, which include but are not limited to brain imaging (e.g., functional MRI and electroencephalography), lesion studies,single-cell recording,and examinations of brain injuriesand other neurological disorders. This course will survey the results of these approaches, which have thus far generated fundamental insights about how the brain supports motor control, attention, memory, emotion processing, social cognition, language, executive function and decision making. Prereq: PSYC 402, PSYC 502, PSYC 513, or PSYC 531; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 720 - Animal Cognition

Credits: 4

Do animals use language or have a culture? Can birds count? Do animals use tools and understand how they function? How do ants navigate their environment to find food and then return to their nest? How animals perceive, attend to, process, store, and represent information from their environment. Research on animal learning and behavior as a framework for investigating cognitive processes in animal learning. Quantitative versus qualitative nature of differences between people and non-human animals. Multidisciplinary approach including the fields of anthropology, physiology, philosophy and biology. Prereq: PSYC 401; PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 513 or PSYC 521; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 722 - Behaviorism, Culture, and Contemporary Society

Credits: 4

Introduces behaviorism as a philosophy of science. Concentration on modern behaviorism as exemplified in the works of B.F. Skinner. Implications of behaviorism for the development and evolution of cultures. Consideration of societal issues (for example pollution, overpopulation, conflict, drug abuse) from a behavioral framework. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 521;/or permission. No credit for students who have completed PSYC 522. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 731 - Brain and Behavior

Credits: 4

Neuropsychology, the study of brain/behavior relationships including clinical topics related to the analysis of neurological diseases in humans and more basic experimental topics related to integrative functions of the brain. The main focus is on cerebral cortex and functions related to perception, movement, attention, memory, and language. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 531;/or permission. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 733 - Drugs and Behavior

Credits: 4

Introduces the principles of psychopharmacology and the effects of psychoactive substances on behavior. Focuses on the therapeutic and recreational use of drugs and the mechanisms of drug action, that is how the drugs affect the brain. Neuropsychiatric function and dysfunction are discussed as they relate to the use or abuse of particular drugs. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 531;/or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 735 - Neurobiology of Mood Disorders

Credits: 4

Neurobiological and neurochemical substrates underlying various psychopathologies, using both animal models and human data. Study of disorders from the field of biological psychiatry including aggression, anxiety, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, unipolar depression, bipolar affective disorder, schizophrenia, and post-traumatic stress disorder. The effectiveness of current behavioral and pharmacological therapy. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 531; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 736 - Attention Disorders

Credits: 4

Attention encompasses several gonitive functions including, but not limited to, the ability to select relevant from irrelevant stimuli, to maintain goal-directed behavior over time, and to process multiple streams of information at once. This course explores how the normal brain "attends", and the consequences of dysfunction in neurchemical systems hypothesized to mediate these abilities including dementia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 531;/or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 737 - Behavioral Medicine

Credits: 4

Behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical alterations, associated with health-promoting behaviors (low-fat diet, exercise) as well as health-impairing behaviors (eating disorders, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption). Topics include stress, coping, type-A behavior, hypertension, and the interface of brain, behavior, and immunity (psychoimmunology, cancer, AIDS). Treatment/therapy are discussed from behavioral and pharmacological perspectives. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 531;/or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 741 - Advanced Topics

Credits: 4

Advanced material in which instructor has specialized knowledge through research and study. May be repeated for different offerings. Topics under this listing may be used to fulfill a major requirement in category CI. A) Psychology as a Natural Science, B) Cognition, C) Behavior Analysis, D) Biological/Sensory. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; plus other prerequisites when offered; or permission.

PSYC 741W - Advanced Topics

Credits: 4

Advanced material in which instructor has specialized knowledge through research and study. May be repeated for different offerings.Topics include: Behavoiral Neuroscience. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; plus other prerequisites when offered; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 755 - Psychology and Law

Credits: 4

Applications of psychology to the study of the law, including theories of legal and moral judgment, participants in the legal system (judges, police, victims, witnesses), the trial process, and plea bargaining. Special focus on the death penalty, the insanity plea, and child witnesses. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502;/or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 756 - Psychology of Crime and Justice

Credits: 4

Examines the psychological aspects of crime and justice, including the following origins and causes of crime: developmental, biological, biopsychological, learning, and mental disorder. Focuses on issues related to homicide, profiling, and serial killers. Examines aggression and violence as well as causes and consequences of criminal homicides. Discussion of the future of crime. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 757 - Psychology of Happiness

Credits: 4

Overview of empirical research in Positive Psychology. We will discuss factors that may influence happiness and aubjective well-being; and effects that well-being may have on other life outcomes such as physical health. Learning involves reading and writing about evidence from research and also experimental exercises (such as foing an act of kindness). Prereq: PSYC 402, PSYC 502 or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 758 - Health Psychology

Credits: 4

Survey of current topics in health psychology, including social stress and the etiology of disease, Type A and other personality factors related to health, modification of risk factors, the practitioner-patient relationship, chronic pain, and the emotional impact of life-threatening illness. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 762 - Counseling

Credits: 4

Theories of counseling, ethical considerations, professional and paraprofessional activities in a variety of work settings. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 553; or PSYC 561; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 763 - Community Psychology

Credits: 4

Examines the sub-field of community psychology, which grew out of clinical psychology but is different from it. Theoretical and research perspectives on prevention, diversity, empowerment, resilience, community intervention, and ecological understandings of behavior. Causes of and interventions in social issues such as interpersonal and community violence and homelessness. Prereq: PSYC 401; PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 552, PSYC 553, or PSYC 561;/or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 775 - Madness in America

Credits: 4

Examines how popular and professional concepts of mental illness are shaped by historical events as well as scientific and medical research. Writings of former psychiatric patients, therapists, researchers, social critics, and historians of psychology and psychiatry. Cultural values, public attitudes, and popular views of mental health and illness as expressed through motion pictures, documentaries, novels, autobiographies, and biographies. The impact of WWI and WWII on how people thought about madness and how it was treated. The 1973 removal of homosexuality from the diagnostic manual of the American Psychological Association; the rise and fall of the lobotomy; feminist cristicisms of psychiatry and psychology. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 561;/or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 780 - Prenatal Development and Infancy

Credits: 4

Psychological development of infants from conception through second year of life. Factors and potential influences on reproductive health and prenatal physical and behavioral development. Transition to parenthood, infant temperament and parent-infant relationships. Developmental patterns of specific capabilities. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 581 or FS 525; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 783 - Cognitive Development

Credits: 4

Theories of cognitive development. Comparison among major theorists on how knowledge, thought, and development are defined and studied. Current research, including cognitive development; memory; perceptual processes; language. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 581; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 785 - Social Development

Credits: 4

Examines development of social interactions. Emphasizes important social relationships for the child (e.g., attachment to parents and friendships with peers). Considers other topics of relevance to social developmentalists, such as temperament, aggression, social cognition, and sex roles. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 581; or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 791 - Advanced Topics

Credits: 4

Advanced material in which instructor has specialized knowledge through research and study. May be repeated for different offerings. Topics under this listing may be used to fulfill a major requirement in category CII. A) Psychology as a Social Science, B) Social Psychology, C) Personality, D) Abnormal/Counseling, E) History of Psychology, F) Child Development, G) Adult Development. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; plus other prerequisites when offered, or permission. Special fee with some topics.

PSYC 791W - Advanced Topics

Credits: 4

Advanced material in which instructor has specialized knowledge through research and study. May be repeated for different offerings. Topics include: Close Relationships. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; plus other prerequisites when offered, or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

PSYC 793 - Internship

Credits: 4-8

Supervised practicum in one of several cooperating New Hampshire mental health/rehabilitation facilities. Coursework knowledge applied to meaningful work and team experience. Commitment includes a negotiated number of weekly work hours and weekly seminars. Supervision by institution personnel and the instructor. A maximum of 4 credits may be applied to the Psychology major. Course applications accepted beginning in March for fall term and October for spring term. Prereq: permission; PSYC major; PSYC 402; 502; 561 Pre- or coreq: PSYC 762.

PSYC 794 - Advanced Internship

Credits: 1-8

Supervised advanced practicum experience in co-operating New Hampshire mental health/rehabilitation facilities. Expands and builds on experiences and skills acquired in PSYC 793. Commitment includes a negotiated number of hours of work per week and participation in weekly seminars. Supervision done by institution personnel and instructor. Prereq: PSYC 793; permission. 1 to 8 credits.

PSYC 795 - Independent Study

Credits: 1-4

A) Physiological, B) Perception;, C) History and Theory, D) Behavioral Analysis, E) Social, F) Cognition, G) Statistics and Methods, H) Experimental, I) Personality, J) Developmental, K) Counseling, L) Psychotherapy, M) Research Apprenticeship, N) Teaching of Psychology, O) Advanced Externship (content area to be determined). Arranged by the student with a psychology faculty sponsor. Learner/sponsor contract required. Minimum time commitment: three hours per credit per week. Enrollment by permission only. Prereq: PSYC 402; 502; or permission.

PSYC 797 - Senior Honors Tutorial

Credits: 4

For senior psychology honors students. Students propose honors theses under the supervision of psychology faculty. Theses proposed and begun in this course are completed in PSYC 799. Prereq: admission to psychology honors program. (Typically offered in fall.)

PSYC 798 - Capstone

Credits: 0

This is a zero credit course to indicate on the transcript that the capstone requirement is fulfilled. PSYC majors only.

PSYC 799 - Senior Honors Thesis

Credits: 4

Under supervision of psychology department faculty members, students complete the honors projects proposed and begun in PSYC 797. The honors project, which should be empirical in nature, culminates in an oral presentation at the end of the semester. Prereq: admission to psychology honors program; PSYC 797. Special fee. (Typically offered in spring.)