Homeland Security (HLS)

HLS 410 - Introduction to Homeland Security

Credits: 4

The primary focus of HLS 410 is to describe the entirety of the homeland security enterprise in the US and to survey many of the major expressions of it, which can become careers in security. This includes a history of homeland security and emergency management disciplines, and the law and policy underpinnings for homeland security and specific units in emergency management, terrorism, intelligence, law and policy, critical infrastructure and risk analysis, corporate security, environmental/human security and cybersecurity.

HLS 415 - Fundamentals of Corporate Security

Credits: 4

HLS 415 will introduce the student to the fundamentals of corporate security including the nature, scope, history, and essential elements of organization (or enterprise) security in the workplace, with emphasis on the private sector. Specific areas include the operational aspects of security strategies for identifying and controlling security exposures, risk management strategies, applicable legal issues, personal protection, property protection, role of intelligence, and concepts of disaster planning and management.

HLS 455 - Introduction to Cybersecurity

Credits: 4

The primary focus of HLS 455 is to provide a survey of the broad field of cybersecurity and information security/assurance. Topics will include a definition of information security, the need for information security and cybersecurity in both the public and private sectors, ethical and legal issues revolving around cybersecurity, risk management and planning, and information/cyber security technology. The role of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in securing the cyberspace and the nation's information-related infrastructures will also be explored.

HLS 480 - Professional Skills in Homeland Security

Credits: 4

HLS 480 prepares students to effectively enter the workforce via an internship or co-op experience. Students learn to prepare a resume and cover letter, practice interviewing, learn about how their personality matches job descriptions, search for internships, and develop an e-Portfolio that describes themselves, their professional aspirations, skills, etc. Professional ethics, decision making, organizational power, basic leadership and management principles and professionalism are discussed and illustrated.

HLS 510 - Fundamentals of Emergency Management

Credits: 4

This course includes thorough coverage of the historical background of emergency management (EM) in the United States as well as many of the most significant laws and policies that have defined and shaped the field, including HLSPD 5, HLSPD 8, the National Flood Insurance Act, and the Stafford Act. Topics include detailed coverage of FEMA's all hazards approach, all phases of the EM cycle, including mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery; integrated emergency management systems, the incident command system, the National Incident Management System, emergency support functions, and risk communications. The course culimnates with each student writing and formally presenting an integrated emergency management plan. Prereq: HLS 410 and HLS 415 or permission.

HLS 515 - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience

Credits: 4

HLS 515 includes an introduction to critical infrastructure security, resilience, and risk analysis as it is conceptualized, regulated and used in the homeland security enterprise. Topics include the history and evolution of critical infrastructure protection including the composition, characteristics and risks to critical infrastructures. Public-private partnerships and sector-specific plans are examined. Resilience in a global context and risk analysis as a means by which resources and assets are allocated to critical infrastructure(s) is presented. Prereq: HLS 410, HLS 415 and HLS 455 or consent of coordinator.

HLS 520 - Homeland Security Law and Policy

Credits: 4

This course is an overview of key legal, policy, and ethical issues in the context of Homeland Security policy and practice. Students examine legal concepts regarding constitutional rights of individuals, legal process, access to courts, the law of war, and national security principles as they relate to homeland security legislation and policy initiatives. Legal principles of due process, habeas corpus, search and seizure. compulsory process, and international agreements are explored in greater depth. The law of war will be examined in the context of preemptive war and the current National Security Strategy, the status of combatants and detention, Elements of national security law, intelligence collection and sharing, the Patriot Act, and military-civilian relations, etc. Prereq: HLS 410 or consent of the instructor.

HLS 580 - Environmental and Human Security

Credits: 4

Students will learn how environmental issues may give rise to socio-political instability around the world which can become threats to US national/homeland security. This course will explore how U.S. domestic and foreign policy, and ultimately, U.S. national security, can be impacted by emergent threats to nations from environmental health issues, climate change, deforestation, infrastructure vulnerabilities, and natural resource shortages caused by rapid industrialization, population growth, and urbanization in less developed countries. In a seminar format, students and faculty will cover a variety of readings and discuss their conclusions and students will have the opportunity to lead class discussions on assigned readings.

Attributes: Environment,TechSociety(Disc)

HLS 595 - Independent Study in Homeland Security

Credits: 1-4

HLS 595 is an independent study in homeland security. Its main function will be to allow students to complete a 500 level homeland security course required in the major, but who are not able to take the required course when it is offered. HLS 595 can substitute for the required core course. In addition, students can also take HLS 595 as a sophomore level independent study as a variable credit course for students wanting to more deeply explore an area of interest. Prereq: Senior standing and permission. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits. Cr/F.

HLS 610 - Exercise Design and Evaluation in Homeland Security

Credits: 4

HLS 610 studies the role and structure of exercise design as it is applied in homeland security and emergency management. Students are introduced to the nature and characteristics of discussion and operations-based exercises and the Homeland Security Exercise Evaluation Program. The legislative and policy background of national preparedness is presented. Students complete a project and presentation that demonstrates how exercises are designed, scripted, implemented (conducted) and evaluated. Prereq: HLS 510 and HLS 515 or consent of coordinator.

HLS 615 - Introduction to Fraud Investigation

Credits: 4

Fraud Investigation is a specific process including acquisition and verification of information that could lead to the confirmation of fraudulent activity and legal consequences. Course topics include various steps in the fraud investigation process, including identification of fraud, planning an investigation, interviewing, gathering of public and non-public evidence, analysis of data, legal considerations, confidentiality, and writing a fraud examination report. Real-world fraud cases are discussed and analyzed. Required course for minor in Forensic Accounting.

HLS 630 - Sports and Large Event Security Management

Credits: 4

This course will address the nature and scope of sport and large event security issues involved in securing the homeland from domestic and international threats to sports and other large events. Motives, methods, and impact of terrorism activity, natural disasters, and crowd management issues in sport and large event venues will be discussed. This course also includes an examination of the basic legislation and operations of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; risk assessment; security planning options; emergency response and recovery, training and exercises. Prereq: HLS 410.

HLS 650 - Intelligence Systems and Structures in Homeland Security

Credits: 4

Intelligence is a systematic process of collection, analysis, and dissemination of information in support of national, state, and/or local policy or strategy. HLS 650 will explore the varied expressions of the intelligence community as it exists in the US. In addition, students will explore the history and development of the IC in the US, major legislative acts that led to the development of intelligence as a major function of US national security strategy. Prereq: HLS 410 or permission of instructor.

HLS 656 - Comparative Homeland Security Systems Lab

Credits: 1

The study abroad component of its prerequisite course, HLS 555. Students go on a 3-week managed study abroad program designed and led by UNH faculty. Prereq: HLS 555 or consent instructor.

HLS 665 - Bioterrorism, Biosecurity, and Biodefense

Credits: 4

This course examines biowarfare, including biological, chemical, and radiological weapons. Historical, plausible, and novel weapons will be studied. Mechanisms of action, biological and societal impacts, detection, treatment and governmental strategies for biodefense will be investigated. Discussions will focus on surveillance and preparedness at the state and federal levels. Relevant aspects of the law will be presented and the bioethical challenges of anti-bioterror research will be explored. Prereq: HLS 410 or BMS 503.

HLS 695 - Independent Study in Homeland Security

Credits: 1-4

HLS 695 is an independent study in homeland security. Its main function will be to allow students to complete a 600 level homeland security course required in the major, but who are not able to take the required course when it is offered. HLS 695 can substitute for the required core course. In addition, students can also take HLS 695 as a junior level independent study as a variable credit course for students wanting to more deeply explore an area of interest. Prereq: Senior standing and permission. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits. Cr/F.

HLS 722 - International White Collar Crime

Credits: 4

It was Edwin Sutherland, an American sociologist of the early 20th century who first began to appreciate and understand white collar crime and distinguish it from other criminality. He was also the first to define it, calling it "crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation". Today, international white collar crime is a global phenomenon which reaches into the highest levels of transnational business and commercial behavior, government, and politics. It includes, but is not limited to, old-fashioned graft and corruption, tax evasion, money laundering, securities and market manipulation, banking and insurance violations and fraud, influence peddling and even election fixing. This course is intended to provide the ICLJ's advanced students with a thorough understanding of what white collar crime is, where it is, how it is executed, what is being done to combat it, and what dangers it presents to established and emerging nations. The course will examine the approaches to these problems used in countries that have a strong interest dealing with white collar criminal issues. In addition, international best practices and standards will be critically assessed.

HLS 724 - International Criminal Law Survey

Credits: 4

This course is a survey of the field of international criminal law. It asks students to consider foundational questions about what counts as an international crime; when an individual country may have jurisdiction over crimes that occur outside the country's boundaries and when and over what crimes an international body may have jurisdiction. It introduces students to the international criminal court; the special tribunals; domestic and international efforts to combat terrorism and an array of transnational crimes like drug trafficking, cybercrimes, white-collar crimes etc.

HLS 726 - International Criminal Court & The Special Tribunals

Credits: 4

This course is about a new and exciting area of law, practice and procedure that in many respects is still in its infancy. During the course you will explore how International Criminal Law and the International Criminal Courts and Tribunals evolved. You will examine their jurisprudence, practice and procedure. Specifically, you will discover how the prosecution operates from the investigation of crimes through to their prosecution. You will look at the role of the defense and the common defenses raised in cases before the courts. An understanding of the full ramifications of International Criminal Law can be challenging because it disturbs some of the well-established concepts that you may have become accustomed to, such as sovereignty, military supremacy, and discrimination.

HLS 750 - Emergent Topics in Homeland Security/Homeland Defense

Credits: 4

HLS 750 will investigate the nature of strategic planning as it relates to homeland security and national security in the United States. In addition, students will explore how strategic planning relates to decision making in more stable environments as well as decision making under uncertainty. Relevant legislation and past decisions (such as the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missle Crisis) will be explored. In addition, the basic concepts of the techniques for strategic communication will be explored, developed, and related to decision making along with the characteristics of making high quality strategic decisions. Prereq: HLS 510 and HLS 515 or consent of instructor. Special Fee.

HLS 760 - Strategic Planning and Decision Making

Credits: 4

HLS 760 investigates the nature of strategic planning as it relates to homeland security and national security in the U.S. Students explore how strategic planning relates to decision making in more stable as well as uncertain environments. Relevant legislation and past decisions (such as the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missle Crisis) are explored including concepts and techniques fro making high quality decisions. Strategic communication principles and techniques are presented. Prereq: HLS 510 and HLS 515 or consent of coordinator. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HLS 770 - Internship in Homeland Security

Credits: 4

HLS 770 represents the professional work experience required in the homeland security major. Students work in a professional setting for a minimum of 180 hours under the supervision of a site supervisor. All internships require students to identify and complete work on a specific project (s) approved by the HLS coordinator. Internships may be taken at any time after students have taken 30 credits of university coursework. Note that students who are academically or otherwise unable to enter into internship must take HLS 799 (thesis in homeland security which requires senior standing and permission from the HLS program coordinator). Prereq: HLS 410, HLS 455 and HLS 480.

HLS 790 - Capstone in Homeland Security

Credits: 4

HLS 790 allows students to work collaboratively with an organization to identify and solve a homeland security, physical security, safety, cybersecurity or emergency management challenges. Each group performs a risk assessment in order to identify their client's primary security or preparedness challenges. Students then use their skill to identify and apply best practices as countermeasures. Students culminate their projects with presentations to their classmates and to their clients. The expectation of this class is to develop a professional example of the student's thinking and writing to solve real world security problems. Prereq: senior standing, HLS 610 and HLS 760 or consent of coordinator.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HLS 795 - Independent Study in Homeland Security

Credits: 1-4

HLS 795 is an independent study in homeland security. Its main function will be to allow students to complete a 700 level homeland security course required in the major, but who are not able to take the required course when it is offered. HLS 795 can substitute for the required core course. In addition, students can also take HLS 795 as a senior level independent study as a variable credit course for students wanting to more deeply explore an area of interest. Prereq: Senior standing and permission. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits. Cr/F.

HLS 799 - Thesis in Homeland Security

Credits: 4

HLS 799 is an alternative professional experience required by the homeland security major. It is designed to be a substitute for HLS 770 (internship in HLS). Students function independently (but keep in regular contact with the instructor) as they devise a thesis topic and write a professional research paper in support of their thesis. The thesis is a research paper that uses either mostly secondary data collection methods with the expectation that the project be equivalent to the 180 hours interns are obligated to work. Cr/F.