Humanities (HUMA)

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Course numbers with the # symbol included (e.g. #400) have not been taught in the last 3 years.

HUMA 401 - Introduction to the Humanities

Credits: 4

Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the humanities. Taking as its entry point a significant work, the course is organized by topics related to that work, selected and arranged to invoke lively intellectual debate among faculty and students alike. Group lectures by the four core humanities faculty members. The instructors teaching the course will provide material for smaller weekly discussion sections led by each of those faculty members. Requirements include lively discussions, papers, and examinations. Not repeatable.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8

HUMA 401W - Introduction to Humanities

Credits: 4

Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the humanities. Taking as its entry point a significant work, the course is organized by topics related to that work, selected and arranged to invoke lively intellectual debate among faculty and students alike. Group lectures by the three core humanities faculty members. The instructors teaching the course will provide material for smaller weekly discussion sections led by each of those faculty members. Requirements include lively discussions, papers, and examinations. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 411 - Humanities I

Credits: 4

Introduction to the humanities and Western culture through literature, history, philosophy, music, art, and architecture. Examination of selected historical periods from classical Greece through the Renaissance through readings, films, slides, and field trips. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 412 - Humanities II

Credits: 4

Introduction to the humanities and Western culture through literature, history, philosophy, music, art, and architecture. Examination of selected historical periods from the Enlightenment to the present through the use of readings, films, slides, and field trips. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 413 - Dramatic Art and Social Reality: The Many Meanings of Performance

Credits: 4

This course illuminates connections between the performed stories of drama and real aspects of our lives. It considers performances on stages, screen, and in everyday life—like social rituals, “scripted” because performers are expected to follow certain social roles. It examines those rituals, investigating how they were authored and whether participants have been appropriately cast. No credit if student has taken HUMA 412: Humanities II: Dramatic Art & Social Reality: The Many Meanings of Performance. Writing intensive.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Fine Arts GP 6; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 440A - Honors/Hooked: Narratives of Addiction, Recovery, and Redemption

Credits: 4

This course explores literature about addiction through both literary an psychological lenses. It focuses on the redemption narrative that structures the understanding of addiction for writers and readers alike. Readings include stories of religious redemption, short fiction, memoirs, self-help texts, and narrative and psychological theory. This course is part of the Honors Symposium "Engaging Addiction". The courses in the Symposium join several times during the semester for common meetings where perspectives can be compared and explored.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8

HUMA 440B - Honors/That Belongs in a Museum! Museums and the Ownership of Antiquities

Credits: 4

Suppose you stumbled upon an artifact from an Indigenous Native American people in your backyard. Do you own it? Or do the heirs of those who produced it? Or does it belong in a museum for all to see? In a series of controversial case studies we will examine what it means to “own” the past, how it should be protected and preserved, and what role museums have had–-and should have—in safeguarding that past.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8

HUMA #444 - Idea of University

Credits: 4

An inquiry course that introduces first-year students to the history of the university and to the philosophical, artistic, and political crises it has undergone and continues to undergo today. HUMA #444 is an interdisciplinary course, team-taught by three professors from different fields. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA #444C - Mozart and the Enlightenment: Social Norms and Sexual Behavior in the Age of Reason

Credits: 4

An interdiciplinary introduction to the European Enlightenment (apporximately 1690-1790) as a cultural phenomenon, arising from developments in the natural sciences, that infused all areas of human endeavor with new ways of thinking and behaving, including social norms and sexual behavior, and how it was communicated and disseminated, not only through the written word but also through theater and music, especially in works of Mozart exploring the use and abuse of Human Reason in daily life. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 444D - Plague/Literary Histories of Epidemics

Credits: 4

Explores the meanings of epidemics as represented in literature. Topics include mysterious ancient disasters, the Black Death, AIDS, and hypothetical diseases used as thought experiments, as well as current controversies about the spread and prevention of disease. How do disease and its control shape state ans social structures? How have the meanings of disease, health, medicine, and the body changed over time? What kind of art does disease give rise to?.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 444E - What is a Criminal?

Credits: 4

Criminals are people who break the law -- In theory. How do people become criminals (with regard to biological, cultural, and economic influences)? What happens to them in the criminal justice system, and how does the system shape the definition of "criminal"? We will also discuss "criminals of conscience" from Thoreau and Gandhi to Edward Snowden. The course will emphasize reading but will also engage with other media, including films, podcasts, and visual art.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 444F - Travelers in the Premodern World

Credits: 4

Travel is a fundamental aspect of the human experience. This course explores the human experience of travel using materials originating from across premodern world. Students investigate materials ranging from maps and pilgrimage accounts, to poetry and stories to understand what has compelled people to undertake the often perilous road. In the process, they consider the role of travel in cultural contact, communication, exchange, and the generation an spread of knowledge. Writing intensive.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Foreign Culture GP 5; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 450 - The Pre-Modern Economy and the Origins of Capitalism

Credits: 4

This course provides a historical introduction to the development of the pre-modern economy from the earliest traces of capitalism in Ancient Greece to the Industrial Revolution. Special attention will be paid to commerce and finance in the Greco-Roman economy, the Commercial Revolution and invention of the firm in Renaissance Italy, early-modern Europe to the Industrial Revolution, and such fundamental thinkers as Karl Marx and Karl Polanyi.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Historical Perspectives GP 4

HUMA 500 - Critical Methods in the Humanities

Credits: 4

Critical analysis of works in the humanities. Focuses on major texts, evaluation of secondary literature, research writing, criticism. Required of all HUMA majors. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 510A - Ancient World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

What is a human being? How should we explain or understand what happens to us? How ought we to live? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science of ancient Greece and Rome. Writing intensive.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Fine Arts GP 6; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 510B - Ancient World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

What is a human being? How should we explain or understand what happens to us? How ought we to live? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science of ancient Greece and Rome. Writing intensive.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 510C - Ancient World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

What is a human being? How should we explain or understand what happens to us? How ought we to live? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science of ancient Greece and Rome. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Historical Perspectives GP 4; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 510D - Ancient World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

What is a human being? How should we explain or understand what happens to us? How ought we to live? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science of ancient Greece and Rome. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Social Science GP 7; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 511A - Medieval World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

What is the soul and how is its health related to temptation and also to specifically Christian virtues? How closely does the medieval definition of an eternal God determine good and evil in daily life? To what extent does the hope of immortality affect the practice of writing literature, making art, studying philosophy, and investigating science? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science from the collapse of the classical world to the rise of capitalism. Writing intensive.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Fine Arts GP 6; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 511B - Medieval World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

What is the soul and how is its health related to temptation and also to specifically Christian virtues? How closely does the medieval definition of an eternal God determine good and evil in daily life? To what extent does the hope of immortality affect the practice of writing literature, making art, studying philosophy, and investigating science? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science from the collapse of the classical world to the rise of capitalism. Writing intensive.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 511C - Medieval World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

What is the soul and how is its health related to temptation and also to specifically Christian virtues? How closely does the medieval definition of an eternal God determine good and evil in daily life? To what extent does the hope of immortality affect the practice of writing literature, making art, studying philosophy, and investigating science? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science from the collapse of the classical world to the rise of capitalism. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Historical Perspectives GP 4; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 511D - Medieval World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

What is the soul and how is its health related to temptation and also to specifically Christian virtues? How closely does the medieval definition of an eternal God determine good and evil in daily life? To what extent does the hope of immortality affect the practice of writing literature, making art, studying philosophy, and investigating science? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science from the collapse of the classical world to the rise of capitalism. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Social Science GP 7; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 512A - Renaissance and Early Modern: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Explores the interrelationship of art, literature, philosophy, and science from the High Renaissance into the 18th century. Study of the works and ideas of such influential figures as Shakespeare and Milton, Raphael and Rembrandt, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. Writing intensive.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Fine Arts GP 6; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 512B - Renaissance and Early Modern: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Explores the interrelationship of art, literature, philosophy, and science from the High Renaissance into the 18th century. Study of the works and ideas of such influential figures as Shakespeare and Milton, Raphael and Rembrandt, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. Writing intensive.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 512C - Renaissance and Early Modern: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Explores the interrelationship of art, literature, philosophy, and science from the High Renaissance into the 18th century. Study of the works and ideas of such influential figures as Shakespeare and Milton, Raphael and Rembrandt, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Historical Perspectives GP 4; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 512D - Renaissance and Early Modern: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Explores the interrelationship of art, literature, philosophy, and science from the High Renaissance into the 18th century. Study of the works and ideas of such influential figures as Shakespeare and Milton, Raphael and Rembrandt, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Social Science GP 7; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 513A - Modern World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Explores the central paradoxes of our culture in the modern age. Is there such a thing as "progress" and if so what is its nature? What is the relation of conscious and unconscious? Is the contemporary world devoid of meaning? Questions such as these are examined in relation to works since the 18th century in the fields of literature, history of science, philosophy, and art. Writing intensive.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Fine Arts GP 6; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 513B - Modern World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Explores the central paradoxes of our culture in the modern age. Is there such a thing as "progress" and if so what is its nature? What is the relation of conscious and unconscious? Is the contemporary world devoid of meaning? Questions such as these are examined in relation to works since the 18th century in the fields of literature, history of science, philosophy, and art. Writing intensive.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 513C - Modern World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Explores the central paradoxes of our culture in the modern age. Is there such a thing as "progress" and if so what is its nature? What is the relation of conscious and unconscious? Is the contemporary world devoid of meaning? Questions such as these are examined in relation to works since the 18th century in the fields of literature, history of science, philosophy, and art. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Historical Perspectives GP 4; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 513D - Modern World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Explores the central paradoxes of our culture in the modern age. Is there such a thing as "progress" and if so what is its nature? What is the relation of conscious and unconscious? Is the contemporary world devoid of meaning? Questions such as these are examined in relation to works since the 18th century in the fields of literature, history of science, philosophy, and art. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Social Science GP 7; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 514A - 20th Century, 1900-1945: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

This course examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science in the first half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of modernism in literature and the arts, the distinctive themes of 20th century philosophy, and crucial innovations in the sciences. Students study the works of such figures as Picasso, Woolf, Einstein, Freud, and Wittgenstern. Writing intensive.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Fine Arts GP 6; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 514B - 20th Century, 1900-1945: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

This course examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science in the first half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of modernism in literature and the arts, the distinctive themes of 20th century philosophy, and crucial innovations in the sciences. Students study the works of such figures as Picasso, Woolf, Einstein, Freud, and Wittgenstern. Writing intensive.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 514C - 20th Century, 1900-1945: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

This course examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science in the first half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of modernism in literature and the arts, the distinctive themes of 20th century philosophy, and crucial innovations in the sciences. Students study the works of such figures as Picasso, Woolf, Einstein, Freud, and Wittgenstern. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Historical Perspectives GP 4; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 514D - 20th Century, 1900-1945: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

This course examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science in the first half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of modernism in literature and the arts, the distinctive themes of 20th century philosophy, and crucial innovations in the sciences. Students study the works of such figures as Picasso, Woolf, Einstein, Freud, and Wittgenstern. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Social Science GP 7; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 515A - 20th Century, 1945-1999: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science since the middle of the twentieth century. Topics include the philosophical and literary implications of the Holocaust and nuclear weapons, movements in the arts and literature since World War II, the rise of the sciences of life and information, and postmodernism. Students study the works of such figures as Arendt, Turing, Beckett, and Pollock. Writing intensive.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Fine Arts GP 6; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 515B - 20th Century, 1945-1999: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science since the middle of the twentieth century. Topics include the philosophical and literary implications of the Holocaust and nuclear weapons, movements in the arts and literature since World War II, the rise of the sciences of life and information, and postmodernism. Students study the works of such figures as Arendt, Turing, Beckett, and Pollock. Writing intensive.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 515C - 20th Century, 1945-1999: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science since the middle of the twentieth century. Topics include the philosophical and literary implications of the Holocaust and nuclear weapons, movements in the arts and literature since World War II, the rise of the sciences of life and information, and postmodernism. Students study the works of such figures as Arendt, Turing, Beckett, and Pollock. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Historical Perspectives GP 4; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 515D - 20th Century, 1945-1999: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Credits: 4

Examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science since the middle of the twentieth century. Topics include the philosophical and literary implications of the Holocaust and nuclear weapons, movements in the arts and literature since World War II, the rise of the sciences of life and information, and postmodernism. Students study the works of such figures as Arendt, Turing, Beckett, and Pollock. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Social Science GP 7; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 519 - Classical Greece

Credits: 4

Examination of the culture of classical Greece through the history, drama, philosophy, and art of the period. Open to all students. Recommended for students in the humanities major. Special fee.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8

HUMA 526 - Humanities and Science

Credits: 4

In this interdisciplinary course, students examine the ways in which scientific and technological understanding affects the development of cultural expression. Scientific, technological and environmental factors are sometimes discussed as if they are separate from human beings, but in this course we will consider the myriad direct, complex, and surprising ways that they drive cultural shifts and are then understood in evolving wats by cultures. Topics vary with instructor. May be repeated once if topics is different. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 550 - Budapest Spring Semester: Special Studies in Comparative Ideas

Credits: 4

This course involves periodic offerings in literature, art, history, philosophy and political science designed to stimulate reflection on ideas and issues in Hungarian and Central European history and culture in a larger global context. Topics vary depending upon the expertise of the resident faculty. Special fee.

HUMA 551 - Budapest Spring Semester: Field Studies in Art and Culture

Credits: 6

This course is designed to provide students with first-hand experience of art, history, culture, folklore, and traditions of Hungary and Central Europe. The course combines preparatory readings with guided field trips to museums, historial sites, and culturally significant events and locations. Students maintain a weekly blog reflecting on field trip experiences.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery)

HUMA 592 - Special Topics in the Humanities

Credits: 2-8

Special topics; offered occasionally. May be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits.

HUMA 592W - Special Topics

Credits: 2-8

Special topics; offered occasionally. May be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits. Topc/Where Did They Come From? The Emergence of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam is Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 622 - Studies of Freedom and Liberty

Credits: 4

Principles of freedom and liberty that helped to form Western culture from the Renaissance to the present. Topics include concepts of human nature, theories of government and society. Readings include Machiavelli, Locke, Paine, Mill, Marx, Freud, Sartre, and Marcuse.

HUMA #640 - Birth of Rock and Roll

Credits: 4

An interdisciplinary study of the cultural forces that brought the birth of rock and roll in the 1950's. This study of pre-rock music and culture will be further enriched by art, literature, and photography which focuses on the roots of rock and roll. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 650 - Humanities and the Law: The Problem of Justice in Western Civilization

Credits: 4

Interdisciplinary modular course examines interpretations of the nature of justice, its origins, the role of the professional judiciary, and the relationship of law and ethics. Students take three successive five-week modules during the semester. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

Attributes: Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8; Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 698 - Independent Study

Credits: 4

Independent study open only to highly qualified juniors and seniors who have completed at least four humanities courses above the 400 level. Requires original research and substantial writing projects under the direction of a member of the core faculty of the humanities. Prereq: HUMA junior or senior majors; four HUMA courses above the 400 level.

HUMA 700 - Seminar

Credits: 4

Provides an opportunity for in-depth reading, viewing, and/or listening to texts and artifacts. Emphasis on the multiple perspectives and methodologies that can be brought to bear upon these works from several humanistic disciplines. May be repeated for credit. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 730 - Special Studies

Credits: 4

Selected topics not covered by existing courses, with subjects to vary. May be repeated for credit. Prereq: one 400- or 500-level HUMA course or junior standing. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 795 - Study of Creativity

Credits: 4

A study of human creativity through representative lives and works of such figures as daVinci, Einstein, Kathe Kollwitz, Bach, Dickens, and Freud. Lectures, class discussions, films, and slides supplemented by gallery tours plays, and concerts. Open to students with a background in humanities or by permission of the instructor. Special fee. (Normally offered every other year.) Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 796 - Study of Contemporary Issues

Credits: 4

Current social and political issues with focus on recent developments in public policy, science, and business, and their impact of social values. Prereq: junior status or permission. (Normally offered every other year.) Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 798 - Research Seminar

Credits: 1-2

Provides a context within which students may discuss and receive direction in the course of completing a major research paper. At the end of the seminar, students present their research to the faculty and their fellow students. Prereq: HUMA 500; senior standing; permission. HUMA majors only. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

HUMA 799 - Research Seminar

Credits: 3-4

Provides a context within which students may discuss and receive direction in the course of completing a major research paper. At the end of the seminar, students present their research to the faculty and their fellow students. Restricted to majors. Prereq: HUMA 500; HUMA 798; senior standing; permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course