Communication (CMN)

CMN 440A - Honors/Communication, Identity and Addiction

Credits: 4

Exploration of how diverse ways of talking about addiction contribute to our understanding -- and ultimate approach toward -- addictive behaviors. Focus will be on a relational approach to understanding the complex lives of human in their social contexts; it is an approach that challenges the dominant individualistic and scientific models of a person. Examination of the ways in which the moral, disease, and psychosocial models of addiction invite us to ignore larger social, cultural, and global issues that contribute to addiction.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

CMN 455 - Introduction to Media Studies

Credits: 4

Nature, development, and the effects of mass media. Overview of mass communication history and theory.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): CMN 455H

CMN 455H - Honors/Introduction to Mass Communication

Credits: 4

Nature, development, and the effects of mass media. Overview of mass communication history and theory.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): CMN 455

CMN 456 - Propaganda and Persuasion

Credits: 4

Introduction to theories of propaganda and persuasion. Examination of symbolic strategies designed to secure or resist social and institutional change. Attention given to case studies of social, political, economic, and religious reformation. Special consideration of the ethical ramifications of such efforts.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Equivalent(s): CMN 456H

CMN 456H - Honors/Propaganda and Persuasion

Credits: 4

Introduction to theories of propaganda and persuasion. Examination of symbolic strategies designed to secure or resist social and institutional change. Attention given to case studies of social, political, economic, and religious reformation. Special consideration of the ethical ramifications of such efforts.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Equivalent(s): CMN 456

CMN 457 - Introduction to Language and Social Interaction

Credits: 4

An introduction to the study of the conversational basis of social reality. Presents an overview of interpersonal communication processes and the ways in which they influence the formation of identity, personal relationships, gender, interactional patterns, conflict, culture, and power. Readings and class material from a variety of authors in the communication discipline as well as related fields in the humanities and the social sciences.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): CMN 502

CMN 500 - Public Speaking

Credits: 4

Performance course buttressed by practical theories of public discourse. Focus on analysis of speaking situations and audiences, message construction, presentation, and critical evaluation. Does not count towards the CMN major.

Equivalent(s): CA 450, CMN 403

CMN 504 - Introduction to Argumentation

Credits: 4

Persuasive discourse as inquiry and advocacy grounded in practical inductive and deductive reasoning. Discovery, analysis, and testing of practical arguments. The nature and function of proof. Some emphasis on applied presentation. Prereq: CMN 456 with C or better, or by permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): CMN 404

CMN 505 - Analysis of Popular Culture

Credits: 4

Locates the development of popular cultural artifacts and practices within the 20th-century social history of the U.S. Examines the political-economic forces that underpinned the commercialization of art, leisure, sports, and other elements of culture in industrial and postindustrial America. Prereq: CMN 456 with C or better, or by permission.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery)

CMN 507 - Introduction to Rhetorical Theory and Analysis

Credits: 4

Major precepts of rhetorical theory. Application of those precepts in analysis and understanding of a wide range of human communication. Consideration of how precepts and issues of rhetorical theory apply to contemporary issues and problems. Prereq: CMN 456 with C or better, or by permission.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery)

CMN 514 - Analysis of Online Identity

Credits: 4

This course will explore how digital media technologies inform strategies of self-presentation and practices of identity formation. We will situate contemporary practices of self-presentation within the historical development of the internet and sociological theories of identity. Students will be encouraged to examine how the internet and mobile technologies challenge existing understandings of concepts such as anonymity, authenticity, reputation, and privacy. Throughout the course, students will be asked to think critically about the ways in which traditional identity markers - such as race, gender, and class - are both challenged and reproduced in digital environments. Drawing on the current digital media landscape, we will explore several contemporary issues including privacy and reputation, self-branding and microcelebrity, online dating, and self-tracking. Throughout the semester, students will use academic literature to identify and address real-world problems.

CMN 515 - Analysis of News

Credits: 4

Explores the psychological, social, economic, political, and cultural factors that influence the definition and reporting of news. Prereq: CMN 455 with C or better, or by permission.

CMN 519 - Advertising as Social Communication

Credits: 4

Social role of advertising, public policy debates concerning advertising, influence of advertising on culture, and methods of analyzing advertising messages. Prereq: CMN 455 with C or better, or by permission.

CMN 535 - Digital Democracies

Credits: 4

This course explores how emerging digital technologies alternately enhance and obstruct the pursuit of democratic values, broadly conceived. We examine the history and meaning of terms like democracy and freedom in the context of both politics (campaigns, voting, legislation) and culture (music, entertainment, and the arts); the history of computers and the Internet; and the impact of digital media on international politics and professional journalism. Prereq: CMN 455 with a C or better, or by permission.

CMN 545 - Media, Religion, and Culture

Credits: 4

This course examines the impact of media on religious belief, practice, and institutions in an American context. We cover the rise of evangelicalism; the development of religious denominations and political parties; the birth of religious broadcasting including the rise of televangelism; and the decline of institutional religion with the emergence of a "spiritual marketplace." We examine religious representations in popular film, music, and news, and ask whether digital technologies have become imbued with religious meaning. Prereq: CMN 455 with a grade of C or better; or by permission.

CMN #556 - Persuasion and Public Problems

Credits: 4

Examination of communication about public problems using major precepts from classical and contemporary rhetorical theory. Application of those precepts discloses how persuasive communication frames public problems and constrains responses to them. By the end of the course students will know how to conduct a rhetorical analysis of public discourse and how to use results from that analysis to criticize, improve, or participate in deliberations about public problems. Prereq: CMN 456; Communication, CMN: Media Practices, and CMN: Business Applications majors only. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

CMN 562 - Collaborative Leadership in the 21st Century

Credits: 4

This course grounds the study of interaction in groups via theories of inter-organizational collaboration. Students will leave this course with a very specific set of knowledge and skills related to dialogue, principled negotiation, constructive conflict, consensus decision making and appreciative inquiry. Lessons focus on the development of a responsible ethic regarding how to share power among diverse group members. This ethic prepares you to lead collaborative groups in organizations, communities, and as family members. Prereq: CMN 457 with a grade of C or better or permission.

CMN 567 - Gender, Race, and Class in the Media

Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to contemporary critical scholarship on the construction of gender, race, and class in the media - particularly popular media. Subjects such as the portrayal of ethnic groups, ideal body image, blue collar men, and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender groups are case studies. This course is one that introduces students to performing communication analysis. Prereq: CMN 455; Communication, CMN: Media Practices, and CMN: Business Applications majors only.

CMN 572 - Analysis of Language and Social Interaction

Credits: 4

In this mid-level course, students develop the observational and analytic skills necessary for the in-depth study of interaction in a variety of everyday and institutional social settings. Settings may include dialogue, multiparty interaction, non-verbal communication and embodiment, identity talk, and communication in organizations. Special attention to developing the reading and research skills used in upper level interpersonal communication courses. Prereq: CMN 457 with C or better, or by permission.

CMN 575 - Research Practicum

Credits: 1-4

Student engagement through direct participation in faculty research projects. Elective credits which do not count towards the major. Instructor permission required. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and permission. Cr/F. Communications majors only.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

CMN 580 - Lying, Deception and the Truth

Credits: 4

The ability to lie is a defining feature of the social life of higher order primates and humans. Deceiving, concealing, lying and evading are forms of communication which are a basic part of everyday human life. This course will explore the tructure and function of lying, deception and evasion in the course of communication. As we do so we will also explore the nature of truth as it applies to human interaction in the world. Prereq: CMN 457.

Equivalent(s): THEA 580

CMN 588 - Analyzing Institutional Interaction

Credits: 4

Examinations of institutional interactions in emergency services, justice/law, medicine, family school encounters, journalism and politics. Shows how the work of society gets done through interaction. Students get hands-on experience analyzing persons' conduct in these interactions. This course is designed to develop students' analytic skills in studying social interaction in institutions, using recorded data in the form of naturally-occurring interactions in these settings. Prereq: CMN 457.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery)

CMN 596 - Special Topics in Media Studies

Credits: 4

Selected topics not covered by existing courses in media studies. Topics vary; course descriptions are available in department office during preregistration. May be repeated for credit if topics differ. Prereq: CMN 455 with C or better, or by permission.

Equivalent(s): CMN 595

CMN 597 - Special Topics in Rhetorical Studies

Credits: 4

Selected topics not covered by existing courses in rhetorical studies. Topics vary; course descriptions are available in department office during registration. May be repeated for credit if topics differ. Prereq: CMN 456 with C or better, or by permission.

CMN 598 - Special Topics in Interpersonal Studies

Credits: 4

Selected topics not covered by existing courses in interpersonal communication. Topics vary; course descriptions are available in department office during registration. May be repeated for credit if topics differ. Prereq: CMN 457 with C or better, or by permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

CMN 599 - Internship

Credits: 1-4

Internships are designed to integrate classroom study and supervised practical experience in a work setting. Each student is required to write a series of reports focusing on aspects of the work experience that are related to coursework in the Communications Department. These assignments are designed to enhance a student's ability to reflect critically on the internship experience and to merge theory and practice. Assignments are available, depending on the number of credits granted (1-4). Students are expected to hold the common exam time (TR, 1240-2) open for occasional meetings. Before starting the internship, students must submit a written proposal to both the work supervisor and the faculty sponsor. The proposal should include detailed information on the duties and responsibilities to be undertaken at the internship site and on the goals and learning objectives as relevant to the Communication Department curriculum. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, or permission. Cr/F.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

CMN 600 - Public Speaking as a Civic Art

Credits: 4

Performance course buttressed by the traditional civic art of rhetoric. Focuses on analysis of speaking situations and audiences, message of construction, presentation, and critical evaluation using major precepts of rhetorical theory. Theoretical and critical issues in the context of rhetorical practices. Prereq for CMN majors: CMN 455, CMN 456,CMN 457, and 500-level courses, or permission; prereq for non-majors: junior or senior standing. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 602 - Theories of Interpersonal Communication

Credits: 4

Analysis and criticism of contemporary perspectives on interpersonal communication. Theories and concepts, issues, and research models are examined as they contribute to our understanding of social interaction. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses, or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 607 - Persuasion in American Politics

Credits: 4

Study of the forms and strategies of persuasive discourse employed by contemporary American political leaders. Analysis of important political addresses of the 20th century, with attention to theoretical and critical issues in political communication and public address. Discussion of the status of rhetoric in modern politics, and the impact of persuasive discourse on campaigns, policy decisions, crisis management, political scandal, and the national identity. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses, or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 614 - Gender and Technology

Credits: 4

Why were telephone operators primarily women? Why do Siri, Alexa, and Cortana all have women's voices? Does Silicon Valley have a gender problem? This course explores the influence of gender on the development, marketing, and use of information and communication technologies. Drawing on theories from communication, gender studies, and science and technology studies, this class will engage in a social examination of the technologies that influence everyday life. Readings and discussions will help students examine the historical relationship between gender, science, and technology; explore the media's role in shaping expectations about gender and technical skill; and understand how design decisions can influence the meanings and practices of communication tools. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457; two CMN 500 level courses.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 619 - Histories of New Media

Credits: 4

New media are a defining feature of 21st-century society, from the internet to social networking sites. But what makes new media "new"? How do new media affect existing social norms, including notions of intimacy, privacy, community, and identity? This course considers the concept of new media from a historical and cultural perspective, examining the social construction of technology, the idea of technological progress, and comparative studies of both "old" and "new" media. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457; two 500-level CMN.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 622 - Digital Rhetoric

Credits: 4

This course examines how traditional rhetorical theories and methods apply in contemporary digitized environments. It asks whether we can employ, as is, traditional theories and methods, many of which were developed centuries ago, or whether we need to develop new approaches in order to understand persuasion in online contests. As it explores these issues, this course tackles both rhetorical production and rhetorical analysis. That is, it asks students to both create and analyze digital rhetoric. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457; two 500-level CMN courses.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 627 - Great Speakers and Speeches

Credits: 4

Historical and critical survey of masterpieces of oratory examining the rhetorical situation and artistic features of great works of spoken discourse. Demosthenes, Cicero, Edmund Burke, Daniel Webster, Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton may be among the orators studied. The course will engage students in critical assessment of eloquence by emphasizing study of historical circumstances, ethical choices, and artistic virtue of the most effective and admired public speakers in Western tradition. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and two 500-level courses, or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): CMN 557

CMN 630 - Psychology of Communication

Credits: 4

Recasts human psychology as a communicative accomplishment, offering a critique of the individualist tradition. Emphasis on the ways in which identity, knowledge, values, and beliefs are constructed in daily social engagements and the pragmatic, political, and moral implications of this view. Implications for our major cultural institutions such as education, health, and politics. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, and CMN 457 with C or better and two 500-level courses with a C- or better, or by permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 634 - Media and Politics

Credits: 4

The goal of this course is to study the role of the media in American politics, and what media evolution means for future politics. Topics such as political campaigns, media effects, news reporting, framing terrorists, etc. are studied in depth. Timely topics such as "are the media liberal or conservative?" are debated in class. Research projects and papers study questions related to important social issues such as women in the media. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level CMN courses; Only open to Communication, CMN: Media Practices, and CMN: Business Applications majors.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 635 - Contemplative Media Studies

Credits: 4

Contemplative Media Studies involves the application of contemplative practices and principles to the critical analysis of media content, technology, and institutions. It links Media Studies to Contemplative Studies, which integrates empirical social-science research (neuroscience, psychology) to first-person practices like meditation, yoga, and art therapy. Through academic essays and arts-based assignments, students strive to become more mindful digital citizens-creative yet critical, hopeful yet judicious with regard to the current and future course of technical development. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457; two 500-level CMN courses, or by permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 637 - Controversy and Reasoning in Law

Credits: 4

Uses rhetorical analysis and criticism to evaluate communication practices in courtroom disputes. Compares conventional American litigation to alternative methods. Explains how stages of a trial shape communication options and norms. Illustrates common subjects and forms for judicial reasoning. Prereq:: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and two CMN 500-level courses. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 647 - Rhetorical Criticism of Media

Credits: 4

Use of rhetorical approaches and methods in the analysis and criticism of contemporary forms of visual media culture. Students examine the social, political, and aesthetic implications of contemporary media forms from within a framework of rhetorical theory. Emphasis on practical analysis employing various rhetorical approaches with a goal of understanding persuasive elements in contemporary media (including television, film, print & broadcast advertising, internet, and social media). Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and two 500-level communication courses.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 650 - Critical Perspectives on Film

Credits: 4

Advanced, focused study of film theory as cultural practice. Topics vary from year to year and with instructor. May be repeated for different topics. Focus may range from general considerations of film theory, criticism, and history, to specific analyses of selected genres, directors, national cinemas, and periods. Course descriptions available in department office during preregistration. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, CMN 550, ENGL 533, or permission. May be repeated for credit.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Equivalent(s): CMN 650W

CMN 650W - Critical Perspectives on Film

Credits: 4

Advanced, focused study of film theory as cultural practice. Topics vary from year to year and with instructor. May be repeated for different topics. Focus may range from general considerations of film theory, criticism, and history, to specific analyses of selected genres, directors, national cinemas, and periods. Course descriptions available in department office during preregistration. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, CMN 550, ENGL 533, or permission. Special fee. Writing intensive. May be repeated for credit.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Equivalent(s): CMN 650

CMN 656 - Environmental Communication and Rhetoric

Credits: 4

Working from a rhetorical perspective toward communication as persuasive action, students learn to analyze environmental communication in public spheres. Communication about the environment is examined in visual and popular culture, print and digital news, advertising and marketing, science communication, corporate communication and advertising, and campaigns and movements. Special attention to issues of public engagement, citizen activism, and public advocacy. Students work on a semester long case study in which they analyze, evaluate, and respond to communication about an environmental problem in a local town. Prereq: two 500-level CMN courses or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 662 - Public Dialogue and Deliberation

Credits: 4

This course explores the theory behind the practice of public dialogue and deliberation. It considers the distinctions and appropriateness of different types and aims of public participation, and how to best facilitate conversations important in the public sphere. The course anchors civil discourse as vital to democracy. Students will design, organize, and implement a public dialogue on campus, facilitating discussions on a relevant topic serving our community. Students marry practice with deep consideration of issues of equity, diversity, voice, representation, neutrality, and power. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-levels, one being CMN 562, or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 666 - Conversation Analysis

Credits: 4

Exploration in how participants in interpersonal communication display their orientation to the fundamental orderliness of conversational sequences in everyday, institutional, and mass media settings. Basic concepts covered include the interactional co-construction of turn-taking, repair, overlap, openings, closings, silences, adjacency, pairs, disagreement, preference, and the role of various linguistic, paralinguistic, and nonlinguistic features in the conversation process. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses, or permission. Only open to Communication majors.Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 667 - Popular Music Studies

Credits: 4

This course provides an opportunity to critically examine and study popular music. Popular music represents one of the most significant global cultural industries, transcending borders and economies, especially as technology ushers in new ways to listen, share, produce, and perform music. This course will look at the role of contemporary popular music in providing a mediated form of communication and culture by examining its historical and cultural development. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 670 - From Silicon Valley to Foxconn: Global Digital Capitalism

Credits: 4

From young Internet users in Ghana's Internet cafe to American teenagers to Chinese factory workers assembling iPhones, and Indian coders migrating to Australia, this course exposes you to the multifaceted lived experiences under global digital capitalism while grounding them in the history and theory of capitalism as an uneven world system. The design of this course encourages you to think critically about what's new and not so new about capitalism in its contemporary digital/neoliberal phase. It helps identify the on-going technology-driven social transformations on a global scale. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 & two 500-level CMN courses.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 680 - Perspectives on Culture and Communication

Credits: 4

Critical interpretation of culture focused on the communication practices and resources of diverse groups. Examination of the reciprocal relationship between communication practices, forms of culture, and cultural identity. Exploration of the conditions necessary for dialogue between differing cultural groups. Emphasis on the role of communication in constructing race, power, cultural domination, and globalization. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, and CMN 457 with C or better and two 500-level courses with a C- or better, or by permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 685 - Gendered Rhetorics

Credits: 4

This course focuses on exploration of the social, rhetorical, and communicative construction of gender through contemporary contexts. We will examine popular and political discourse and discuss how such discourse structures and disciplines our everyday experiences of sex (male/female) and gender (how society shapes understanding of those categories). Prereq: CMN 456; CMN 455; CMN 457; two 500-level CMN courses.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 696 - Seminar in Media Studies

Credits: 4

Variable topics in media research, theory, and practice. May be repeated for different topics. Topic descriptions available in department office during preregistration. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses, or permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 1 time.

Equivalent(s): CMN 696W

CMN 696W - Seminar in Media Studies

Credits: 4

Variable topics in media research, theory, and practice. May be repeated for different topics. Topic descriptions available in department office during preregistration. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses, or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 1 time.

Equivalent(s): CMN 696

CMN 697 - Seminar in Rhetorical Study

Credits: 4

Variable topics in rhetorical research, theory, and practice. May be repeated for different topics. Topic descriptions available in department office during preregistration. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses, or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 1 time.

Equivalent(s): CMN 697H

CMN 697H - Honors/Seminar in Rhetorical Study

Credits: 4

Variable topics in rhetorical research, theory, and practice. May be repeated for different topics. Topic descriptions available in department office during preregistration. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses, or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): CMN 697

CMN 698 - Seminar Interpersonal Studies

Credits: 4

Variable topics in interpersonal research, theory, and practice. May be repeated for different topics. Topic descriptions available in department office during preregistration. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level courses, or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 2 times.

Equivalent(s): CMN 695

CMN 702 - Seminar in Interpersonal Communication Theory

Credits: 4

In-depth concentration on a particular theoretical orientation in interpersonal communication. Original works are read. Theoretical orientation varies by semester. May be repeated for different topics. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, and CMN 457 and two 500-level CMN courses.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

CMN 703 - Seminar in Rhetorical Theory

Credits: 4

Focused study of problems in rhetorical theory construction through examination and criticism of selected theoretical frameworks used to explain or interpret rhetorical phenomena. May be repeated for different topics. Prereq: permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): CMN 703H, NR 725

CMN 714 - Youth and Media

Credits: 4

This course will situate contemporary debates about youth and media in historical and theoretical context by examining the ways in which media texts and technologies construct and reflect ideas about youth culture. With a focus on western societies, we will examine the cultural, economic, and political factors that contributed to the social construction of adolescence as a distinct lifecycle stage in the twentieth century. In particular, we will look at how media industries have worked to define and commodify this life stage, thereby creating expectations about what it means to "grow up" in western cultures. We will explore the importance of media texts - including music and fashion - in the construction of youth subcultures. Our investigation of subcultures will consider the role of race, class, and gender in academic theories about young people. We will examine how "moral panics" about youth culture and counter cultural movements are reflected and reproduced in current fears about the effects of media technologies and texts on teenagers. We will conclude by investigating how these various interventions play out in discussions about adolescents' media production, particularly in a digital environment in which young people are simultaneously constructed as savvy "digital natives" and vulnerable victims of media messages.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 719 - Surveillance and Society

Credits: 4

Surveillance is fundamentally concerned with social control. The course tracks the historical development of surveillance, from its origins in embodied experience and record keeping through the rise of computing, social media and big data. This history provides a backdrop against which critical theories of surveillance are introduced, drawing attention to how power is exercised through systems of identification, social classification, visibility, and statistical knowledge. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457; two 500-level CMN.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 730 - Family Communication

Credits: 4

Exploration of the patterned communication in families and the ways in which our understanding of these patterns can be utilized to understand and transform unwanted family interactions. Varying cultural discourses of family communication are used to explore the dialogic construction of family and self. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and two 500-level CMN courses, or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 735 - Media & Ethics

Credits: 4

This course asks how human beings can flourish (i.e. lead meaningful and purposeful lives) in the context of increasingly complex systems of digital media and information systems. We do so through the lens of virtue ethics, meaning that we place special emphasis on concepts like authenticity, wisdom, courage, and integrity. The course's capstone project asks students to develop a clear and well-informed ethical framework for the mass-mediated aspects of their personal, professional, and civic lives. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457; three 500-level CMN courses, or by permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 737 - Principles of Rhetorical Crit

Credits: 4

Application of critical principles to message evaluation. Consideration of the varying roles, methods, and standards of rhetorical critics. Special attention to major perspectives on rhetorical criticism including Neo-Aristotelian, historical, dramatistic, generic, literary, and psychological. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and two 500-level CMN courses, or permission. CMN majors only. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): CMN 656

CMN 742 - Dialogue and Teamwork

Credits: 4

This course is about team building, alternative conflict resolution, and creative problem solving. We will explore the idea that, contrary to prevailing cultural assumptions, a significant factor in our achievements at work and play can be traced not to our individual attributes but rather to the relationships that we develop in our conversations with others. We will examine the dialogic basis of these relationships, drawing on a range of philosophic traditions and practical activities that highlight the social basis of thought. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and two 500-level CMN courses, or permission. CMN majors only.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 756 - Rhetorics of Display

Credits: 4

This course examines a selection of displays with the goal of acquiring perspective for understanding and evaluating how they engage with people who come into contact with them. Displays examined range among oratory, photographs, advertisements, films, architecture, monuments, and statuary, public demonstrations, and presentations of self. Attention is given to questions about identity and belonging, authenticity and simulation, and public memory. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and two 500-level courses, or permission. CMN majors only.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 757 - Public Address and the American Experience

Credits: 4

Study of persuasive texts set firmly in their historical and social contexts. Discussion of the impact of popular discourse on historically significant political and social events. Analysis of how leading persuasive speakers and writers responded to the fundamental questions confronting their age and articulated ideas in a manner that provoked or motivated their community, state, or nation. Historical period studied will vary. May be repeated when topic varies. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-level CMN course or permission. CMN majors only. Special fee.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Equivalent(s): CMN 657

CMN 760 - Mediation

Credits: 4

This course will explore different theories and models of mediation as they inform the broader topic of conflict resolution. Emphasis will be on models that examine relational processes as opposed to models that provide a list of skills or techniques for mediation. To that end, the course will focus on transformative dialogue as a mode of mediation and conflict resolution rather than on compromise or consensus models. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, and two 500-level CMN courses, or permission. CMN majors only. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 762 - Organizational Communication and Society

Credits: 4

This course will demonstrate how communication is key to understanding how organizations work. Through such topics as culture, identity, structure, systems, globalization, and change, the course examines the ways individuals and society are shaped by interactions with the organizations. Through case studies, we examine the way people communicate in organizational contexts, and the social, ethical, and sometimes political implications. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 and two 500-levels, or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 770 - From Pokemon to K-Pop: East Asian Media and Popular Culture

Credits: 4

From K-pop to Pokemon, from TV drama to video games, this course introduces you to the media and popular cultural scene in one of the most dynamic regions of the world economy today. It gives you the theoretical tool to understand and analyze these media and cultural phenomena. While acknowledging some common defining characteristics of East Asian societies, we will pay attention to the internal diversities, differences and transcultural flows within the region as well as East Asian nations. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457 & two 500-level CMN courses.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 772 - Seminar in Media Theory

Credits: 4

Detailed analysis of major theories related to the interaction of communication technologies and society. Application to current examples in politics, advertising, and entertainment. May be repeated for a different topic. Prereq: CMN 455, 456, 457 and two 500 level courses, or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

CMN 788 - Opening Everyday Interaction

Credits: 4

Examination of how everyday human social interactions begin. Provides hands-on experience analyzing verbal and nonverbal social actions during naturally occurring interactions, including telephone conversations and especially face-to-face encounters between previously acquainted and unacquainted persons socializing and/or doing work. Explores how parties use the openings of interactions to (re)-create and maintain social relationships. Encourages students to develop intellectual curiosity about everyday social life. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, (2)-CMN 500 levels or permission. Open to CMN majors only.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CMN 795 - Independent Study

Credits: 1-4

Advanced individual study in rhetoric, media, or interpersonal communication. Project to be developed with supervising instructor. Prereq: permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): CMN 795W

CMN 795W - Independent Study

Credits: 1-4

Advanced individual study in rhetoric, media, or interpersonal communication. Project to be developed with supervising instructor. May be repeated up to a maximum of 8 credits. Prereq: permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): CMN 795

CMN 796 - Comm-Entary Journal

Credits: 1

Serve on the editorial board of student run communication journal. Elective credit which does not count toward the major. Prereq: CMN 455, CMN 456, CMN 457, or permission. CMN majors only. Cr/F.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits.

CMN 799H - Honors Thesis

Credits: 4

Written thesis based on substantial and original research under the direction of a full-time member of the communication faculty. Thesis must be in the form and style of a publishable, scholarly work. Restricted to seniors seeking honors in major.