Animal Sciences (ANSC)

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Course numbers with the # symbol included (e.g. #400) have not been taught in the last 3 years.

ANSC 401 - Animals and Society

Credits: 4

Through an interdisciplinary and historical lens, students delve into the interaction and interdependence of animals and people, the changes and patterns over time, and the resulting implications for the animal industry and the quality of life for animals, people, and the planet. Topics covered include agricultural production, organic farming, sustainability, global agriculture, Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs), research, nutrition, food safety, genetics, animal health, aquaculture, animal welfare, breeding, recreation, companionship, and the reproduction of domestic animals. What are the major changes in meat consumption by humans? What is the effect of these changes on the environment and large and small farm operations? What are the effects of biotechnological research performed on animals for human benefits? What is the difference between animal welfare and animal rights? Why should we care? In what whys does this affect us?.

Attributes: Biological Science(Discovery); Discovery Lab Course; Biological Science GP 3B

ANSC 402 - Horsemanship

Credits: 3

For beginning, intermediate, and advanced riders. Lecture and lab (lesson) format. All levels will work on correct position for dressage and combined training with the integration of appropriate theory. All students are required to perform the following tasks independently: properly groom, tack and cool out their horses. Students should allow time before and after lab to do so. For the safety of horse and rider, there is a rider weight limit of 200 pounds for all mounted activities in the UNH Equine Program, including ANSC 402. There are other courses that provide students with opportunities for hands-on experience with horses. Students who exceed the weight limit for ANSC 402 are encouraged to contact Sarah Rigg at sarah.rigg@unh.edu to discuss other alternative courses. Special fee. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Lab. Prereq: permission.

ANSC 403 - Summer Horsemanship

Credits: 1

For beginning and intermediate riders. Basics of balance seat, specializing in basic dressage and combined training. There is no lecture with this summer course. Limited number of students may stable their horses at the University. Special fee. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credits. Prereq: permission.

ANSC 405 - Theory of Horsemanship

Credits: 2

Principles and theory of horsemanship, dressage and jumping, including biomechanics of the horse and rider, rider position and aids, cross-country jumping and conditioning, and the horse's instincts, senses, behavior and training as they relate to riding. Online only.

ANSC 406 - Careers in Animal Science

Credits: 1

Survey of various areas of animal and veterinary science and opportunities available. Cr/F.

ANSC 411 - Freshman Seminar in Equine Science

Credits: 1

Seminar format class. This introductory level class provides students with an overview of the equine industry, its economic impact and pressures and the job opportunities available. Class also includes investigation of the requirements and options within the UNH Equine Program and exploration of the opportunities and resources available for students. Cr/F.

ANSC 419 - Horse Power

Credits: 4

Students explore the enduring bond between the horse and man and the effect of that bond on civilization by considering: How has the horse and man's use of the horse shaped civilization and contributed to societal change? How has the progress of civilization and societal change affected the horse and its role in society? What does our use of the horse say about us as individuals and as a society? Cannot receive credit if credit received for ANSC #444B.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Literature, Phil, Ideas GP 8

ANSC 421 - Animal Agriculture Today

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the scope and diversity of animal agriculture at the global, national and local levels. It also provides an introduction to the animal sciences through which students 1) learn basic animal science terminology 2) acquire an appreciation of the objectives of various animal enterprises and 3) gain understanding of contemporary trends, challenges and opportunities within animal agriculture. Special fee.

ANSC #444A - Animal Ethics: Your Child or Your Pet

Credits: 4

Human attitudes toward other animals are generally divided into five categories: animal exploitation, animal use, animal welfare, animal rights, and animal liberation. While all five categories are examined, this course concentrates on the differences between animal welfare and animal rights. These two categories differ fundamentally on the basis of the ethical or moral status they give animals. Past human societies have justified both the worship of animals and the torture and sacrifice of animals to the gods. Animal rights believers rely on a rights-based philosophy, while animal welfare advocates concentrate on a utilitarian based set of values. Course concentrates on the application of these two ethical philosophies to current uses of animals such as the use of animals in research, the use of animals as food (factory farming), the production and use of transgenic animals, and the use of animals as organ donors for humans (xenotransplantation). Since animal rights is, in itself, not a discipline, students depend on information from other disciplines ranging from moral philosophy and ethics to history to genetics, production agriculture, and ethology. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Environment,TechSociety(Disc); Social Science GP 7; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

ANSC #444B - Horse Power: Transforming and Reflecting Civilization

Credits: 4

Students explore the enduring bond between the horse and man and the effect of that bond on civilization by considering: How has the horse and man's use of the horse shaped civilization and contributed to societal change? How has the progress of civilization and societal change affected the horse and how its role in society? What does our use of the horse say about us as individuals and as a society? Writing intensive. Special fee.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Historical Perspectives GP 4; Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

ANSC 500 - Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies

Credits: 4

Comprehensive examination of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies including types of therapeutic riding and its physical, cognitive, and emotional benefits for clients with a variety of disabilities. Topics include hippotherapy, therapeutic riding, equine-facilitated mental health, youth at risk, therapeutic vaulting, carriage driving, equipment needs/modifications, special considerations for selecting and training the therapy horse, and the role of the volunteer therapist and instructor. Students have the opportunity to work with horses and riders in the UNH Therapeutic Riding Program during labs, as well as view other programs on mandatory field trips. Special fee.

ANSC 504 - Equine Science

Credits: 4

A fundamental equine science course including anatomy, sports medicine, nutrition and preventative care. Students present oral and written journal reviews on equine science topics pertinent to lecture. Prereq: BIOL 412.

ANSC 507 - Survey of Equine Training Techniques

Credits: 3

Physiological development, control, and education; biting, lunging, driving, and equine gymnastics. Special fee. Lab.

ANSC 510 - Integration of Culture and Agriculture in Ireland: Past, Present, and Future

Credits: 2 or 4

What was the worst natural disaster in 19th century Europe? What characterizes Ireland's agriculture in the 21st century? In this interdisciplinary course, students examine the cultural, historical, political, economical, and religious influences on Ireland's agriculture, fisheries, and forestry. The crowning experience of the course, a 10-day study abroad in late May, provides students with a window to the world as they experience the culture, agriculture, and topography of Ireland. Students will immerse themselves in local history and culture as they tour working agricultural farms, university research facilities, and cultural landmarks. Permission required. Not open to freshmen. Special fee. Writing intensive. 2 or 4 credits.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Foreign Culture GP 5; Writing Intensive Course

ANSC 511 - Anatomy and Physiology

Credits: 4

Discussion/comparison of the principles of mammalian form and function. Includes molecular and cellular mechanisms of major processes (such as muscle contraction, neural transmission, and signal transduction) and systematic aspects of the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and renal systems. Prereq: BIOL 411 and BIOL 412. Special fee. Lab. No credit if credit earned for BMS 507 and BMS 508; ZOOL 518. Not open to freshmen.

ANSC 512 - Anatomy and Physiology

Credits: 4

Discussion/comparison of the principles of mammalian form and function. Includes molecular and cellular mechanisms of major processes (such as muscle contraction, neural transmission, and signal transduction) and systematic aspects of the nervous, endocrine, cardiovasular, respiratory, gastronintestinal, and renal systems. Prereq: BIOL 411 and 412 and ANSC 511. Special fee. Lab. No credit if credit earned for BMS 507 and BMS 508. Not open to freshmen.

ANSC 520 - Classical Dressage Experience in Portugal

Credits: 2

Concentrated study of the Portuguese method of classical dressage at L'Escola De Equitaco De Alcainca 'N Alcainca, Portugal. Affords students the opportunity to ride at a premiere center for equestrian art with a master of classical dressage and to experience the culture of Portugal. Offers full immersion in dressage riding, teaching, and training. Trip takes place over Spring Break. Weekly seminar held prior to departure. Special fee. Prereq: ANSC 402: Horsemanship at I-2 level or above. Permission required. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits.

ANSC 543 - Technical Writing in Animal Sciences

Credits: 2

Emphasis on writing scientific articles and articles for the end user on subjects pertaining to the animal science industry. Students are expected to make several oral presentations. Resume preparation is also included. Prereq: ENGL 401 or equivalent; permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANSC 600 - Field Experience

Credits: 1-4

A supervised experience providing the opportunity to apply academic experience in settings associated with future professional employment and/or related graduate opportunities. Must be approved by a faculty adviser selected by the student. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credit hours. Permission of supervising faculty member required. Cr/F.

ANSC 602 - Animal Rights and Societal Issues

Credits: 4

To explore all aspects of human-animal interaction and welfare, emphasizing social, ethical, biological, historical and economic aspects of animal care and use. (Juniors and seniors only.) Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANSC 609 - Principles of Animal Nutrition

Credits: 4

Applied animal nutrition and nutrient metabolism. Prereq: one year of chemistry; one semester of physiology.

ANSC 612 - Genetics of Domestic Animals

Credits: 4

Application of basic and molecular genetics to the diagnosis and control of inherited diseases of domestic animals and application of quantitative genetics for the improvement of economically important traits of farm animals. Prereq: BIOL 411 or permission.

ANSC 615 - Dairy Farm Internship

Credits: 14

An internship on a commercial dairy farm allowing the student day-to-day management of a herd of Holstein cows health and management (animal and financial) are studied. Homework and monthly exams. Dairy Management majors only. Permission required.

ANSC 620 - Equine Diseases

Credits: 4

Provides an understanding of the normal versus the abnormal equine including recognition of clinical signs of the abnormal equine., diagnosis and treatment options. Knowledge of when to call a veterinarian and how to administer follow up care. Emphasis on preventative health care. Prereq: ANSC 504. Special fee. (Juniors and seniors only.)

ANSC 625 - Diseases of Small Ruminants, Swine, Poultry, and Camelids

Credits: 4

This course focuses on concepts of health and disease as they relate to domestic small ruminants (goats and sheep), swine, poultry, and camelids (llamas and alpacas). Basic principles of disease diagnosis, transmission, treatment, and prevention are introduced and applied to specific disease conditions in these species. The course is divided into sections that focus on each group of animals and specific diseases are classified and taught based on the primary body system that is affected. Prereq: AAS 439, ANSC 511, ANSC 512.

ANSC 640 - Principles of Riding Instruction

Credits: 4

Introduction to the principles, theory and practice of Riding Instruction. Includes discussion of styles of learning and instruction as applied to a riding environment, student assessment, skill acquisition, lesson planning, horse selection and principles of group and private riding instruction. Students will use lab time to observe, assist and practice teaching in sections of ANSC 402, which will be matched according to their abilities and interests. Students will prepare for ARIA licensing examinations as part of class. Fall semester only. Lab. Prereq: ANSC 402 at Intermediate 1 or above, or permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANSC 641 - Principles of Dressage Instruction

Credits: 2

Advanced principles and theory of dressage and advanced concepts in teaching and coaching dressage. Students will use lab time to observe, assist and practice teaching in dressage-only sections of ANSC 402. Students will prepare for ARIA licensing examinations as part of class. Spring semester only. Lab. Prereq: ANSC 640.

ANSC 642 - Principles of Jumping Instruction

Credits: 2

Advanced principles and theory of jumping and advanced concepts in teaching and coaching over fences in the arena and cross-country. Students use lab time to observe, assist and practice teaching in intermediate I and II level sections of ANSC 402. Lab. Prereq: ANSC 640. Offered spring semester of every odd numbered year.

ANSC 643 - Principles of Therapeutic Riding Instruction

Credits: 4

Principles and theory of teaching therapeutic riding, including special considerations of teaching in a therapeutic environment and methods of instruction for individuals with a variety of disabilities. Lab consists of observing, assisting and practice-teaching in UNH Therapeutic Riding Program as preparation for PATH International instructor certification process which is done as part of this course. Spring semester only, biannually, odd numbered years. Prereq: ANSC 640 and ANSC 500.

ANSC 650 - Dairy Industry Travel Course

Credits: 1

Extended field trip to a variety of dairy farms and dairy related businesses in the Northeast with students and faculty from other New England land grants. Includes discussion sessions, case study, problem solving, and journal report. Prereq: permission. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 credits. Special fee.

ANSC 665 - Principles of Horse Trials Management

Credits: 2

Theory and hands-on involvement in the organizational process of managing an event competition. Topics will include budgeting, logistical needs, working with entries, sponsorship, awards, publicity, facilities management, course design and committee management. Students will actively participate in the management and preparation of the UNH Horse Trials, overseeing the committees working in the phases of the event and also performing other responsibilities. 1-credit, half semester course. (During the fall semester, the class will meet for the first half of the semester; during the spring semester, the class will meet for the second half of the semester)

ANSC 694 - Summer Cooperative for Real Education in Agricultural Management

Credits: 4

SCREAM (Summer Cooperative for Real Education in Agricultural Management) is a course in which students perform the work and make financial and management decisions associated with the CREAM dairy herd. Students assume complete responsibility for the management and care of the 25-cow herd for the entire summer. SCREAM provides students with a unique experiential learning model that will help them understand how to work together to manage and operate a small business, the decision-making skills required in production agriculture, and the application of science to the management of a dairy herd. Prereq: upper-class standing, permission.

ANSC 695 - Supervised Teaching Experience

Credits: 1-2

Participants are expected to perform such functions as leading discussion sections, directing and assisting in laboratories, and assisting students with their problems in courses that participants have completed successfully. Enrollment is limited to juniors and seniors who have a minimum 3.00 cumulative average. Prereq: permission of instructor and department chairperson. May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits. Cr/F.

ANSC 698 - Cooperative for Real Education in Agricultural Management (CREAM)

Credits: 4

CREAM (Cooperative for Real Education in Agricultural Management) is a 2-semester course in which students perform the work and make the financial management decisions associated with the CREAM dairy herd. Students assume complete responsibility for the management and care of the 25-cow herd for the entire academic year. CREAM provides students with a unique experiential learning model that will help them understand how to work together to manage and operate a small business, the decision-making skills required in production agriculture and the application of science to the management of a dairy herd. Two semesters of 4 cr. each are required. Prereq: AAS 425 or permission.

ANSC 701 - Physiology of Reproduction

Credits: 4

Comparative aspects of embryology, anatomy, endocrinology, and physiology of reproduction. Lab.

ANSC 708 - Ruminant Nutritional Physiology

Credits: 3

Anatomy of the ruminant gastrointestinal tract, physiological factors related to rumen function, and microbial and whole-body metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, and lipids. Prereq: BMS 503 and BMS 504 or equivalent.

ANSC 710 - Dairy Nutrition

Credits: 4

Feeding management of dairy cattle. Emphasis on feedstuffs, nutritional requirements, and diet formulation for efficient production and optimum health. Prereq: ANSC 609 or NUTR 750; permission.

ANSC 715 - Physiology of Lactation

Credits: 4

Examines the biological and biochemical influences of the lactation process. Emphasis on the physiological effects of environments, hormones, and nutrition on milk synthesis and secretion, mammary physiology, and maternal response. Prereq: ANSC 701, permission.

ANSC 724 - Reproductive Management and Artificial Insemination

Credits: 4

Focus on goals and fundamentals of reproductive management of horses, dairy and livestock animals, and through actual experience, development of competency in performing modern breeding techniques for equine and bovine reproduction. Permission required. Special fee. Lab.

ANSC 725 - Equine Sports Medicine

Credits: 4

Course focuses on equine anatomy and physiology in relation to athletic performance and injury. Students write an independent paper assessing the use of an equine heart rate monitor on either a UNH or private horse during the semester. (Juniors and seniors only.) Prereq: ANSC 504, 512, 620. Special fee.

ANSC 727 - Advanced Dairy Management I

Credits: 4

Advanced management evaluation of milking procedures, reproduction, genetics, herd health, feeding, housing, and milking systems. Prereq: junior or senior standing; permission.

ANSC 728 - Advanced Dairy Management II

Credits: 4

Advanced management evaluation of record keeping, financial and business management, personnel management, waste management, and marketing. Prereq: junior or senior standing; permission. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANSC 750 - Collaborative Farm Design and Development

Credits: 4

As a semester long group project, students will design an economically feasible, fully operational, diversified small farm. Students will need to consider site selection, infrastructure, equipment, labor, animal production and health, financing options, marketing and sales, etc. in their design. The final project will be presented in both an oral and a written format. Independent initiative and group collaboration are both integral to success in this project.

ANSC 795 - Investigations

Credits: 1-4

Investigations in genetics, nutrition, management, diseases, histology, equestrian management/agribusiness, physiology, cell biology, microbiology, dairy management, or teaching experience. May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits. Prereq: permission.

ANSC 795W - Investigations

Credits: 1-4

Investigations in genetics, nutrition, management, diseases, histology, equestrian management/agribusiness, physiology, cell biology, microbiology, dairy management, or teaching experience. May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits. Prereq: permission. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANSC 796 - Equine Senior Seminar

Credits: 2

This course is geared to prepare graduating seniors for professional work experience, including skills related to job seeking, resume preparation and interviewing for work in the equine field. In addition, students will engage in dialogue regarding current and relevant controversial topics within the equine industry. Through guided group discussion, selected readings and guest speakers, student are exposed to subjects which equine professionals must confront and address within the equine industry. This course serves as a preparation for and pre-requisite to the Equine Capstone Experience, ANSC 797.

ANSC 797 - Equine Capstone Experience

Credits: 4

This course allows students to review critical professional skills, concepts and theories necessary for success within the equine industry and then to demonstrate competence in these areas, to a panel of equine program faculty. Students also coordinate logistics and content of an outreach Equine Education Day. Successful completion allows students to showcase professional skills and abilities to the non-academic equestrian community. Prereq: ANSC 796.

ANSC 799 - Honors Senior Thesis

Credits: 1-4

Independent research culminating with a written honors thesis in A) Genetics; B) Nutrition; C) Management; D) Diseases; E) Histology; F) Light Horsemanship; G) Physiology; H) Cell Biology; I) Microbiology; J) Dairy Management. May be repeated up to a maximum of 8 credits. Prereq: permission. IA. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course