English (ENGL)

ENGL 400 - English for International Students

Credits: 1-4

Designed for international students to provide additional support in course work. Students continue to develop skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in English. No letter grades. Course graded. Prereq: permission from ESL Institute. Cr/F.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL #400A

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail

ENGL #400A - Academic English for ESL

Credits: 4

Preparation for the reading, writing, and speaking assignments that students encounter in academic courses. Students complete reading, writing, and speaking assignments every week, with close guidance from the instructor. In addition to the time they spend in class, students also have frequent individual conferences with the instructor. No more than 16 combined credits for ENGL 400 and ENGL #400A may be counted toward a UNH degree. Special fee.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 400

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 401 - First-Year Writing

Credits: 4

Training to write more skillfully and to read with more appreciation and discernment. Frequent individual conferences for every student.

Attributes: Writing Skills(Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 401A, ENGL 401H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 401A - First Year Writing for Multi-Lingual Students

Credits: 4

A special section of first-year writing for students whose native language is not English. Training to write more skillfully and to read with more appreciation and discernment, with special attention to the challenges of non-native speakers of English. Supplemental work on listening and speaking as necessary. Frequent individual conferences for every student. Students may not take both ENGL 401 and ENGL 401A for credit.

Attributes: Writing Skills(Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 401, ENGL 401H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 401H - Honors/First-Year Writing

Credits: 4

Training to write more skillfully and to read with more appreciation and discernment. Frequent individual conferences for every student.

Attributes: Honors course; Writing Skills(Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 401, ENGL 401A

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 401S - Literacy Studio

Credits: 2

Develops college-level literacy skills through scaffolded instruction, necessary for success in English 401.

Co-requisite: ENGL 401

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail

ENGL #402 - Introduction to Literature for International Students

Credits: 4

The art of thoughtfully enjoying major literary works. This course is intended for students who are participating in the ESL program. Permission required from ESL Institute.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 403W - Exploring Literature

Credits: 4

The art of thoughtfully enjoying major literary works. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 403

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 405 - Introduction to Linguistics

Credits: 4

Overview of the study of language: universal properties of human language, Chomsky's innateness of hypothesis, language acquisition in children, dialects and language variation, language change. Includes introduction to modern grammar (phonology, syntax, semantics) and to scientific linguistic methodology. (Also offered as LING 405.)

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery); Inquiry (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): ENGL 405H, ENGL 505, ENGL 505H, LING 405, LING 405H, LING 505, LING 505H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #415A - Literature and Law

Credits: 4

From the gritty mean streets to the marble columned courthouse, 'Literature and Law' addresses issues of interpretation and moral judgement. Students will examine the literary explorations of various facets of the legal system and criminality and address fundamental questions raised by the law. Writing intensive. Ideal for students interested in: Justice Studies, Sociology, Political Science, and Psychology. Prereq: ENGL 401 (B or better). Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL #415B, ENGL 415C, ENGL 415D, ENGL #415E, ENGL #415G, ENGL 415J

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #415B - Literature and Business

Credits: 4

Reading literature provides fresh ways to consider the purposes, benefits, strategies, ethics, and risks of business. Using a variety of literary forms (poetry, short fiction, novels, plays, and essays) this course serves as a reflective study of business practices and how they affect individuals and groups. This course asks students to consider how literature can help us think more broadly about the function business. Ideal for students interested in Business Administration, Marketing, and Economics. Prereq: ENGL 401 (with a B or better). Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL #415A, ENGL 415C, ENGL 415D, ENGL #415E, ENGL 415F, ENGL #415G, ENGL 415J

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 415C - Literature and Medicine

Credits: 4

Literary representations of medical practice are used to prompt discussion of broad issues concerning medical philosophy and medical ethics, the image of the medical professional in the media, differing conceptions of healing in various social contexts worldwide, and changes in biological science and medicine on the larger society. Ideal for students interested in: Health Care, Biomedical Sciences, Physical therapy, and Nutrition. Prereq: ENGL 401 (with a B or better). Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL #415A, ENGL #415B, ENGL #415E, ENGL 415F, ENGL #415G, ENGL 415J

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #415E - Literature and Cyberculture

Credits: 4

What is "cyberculture" and how has it been portrayed in various forms of literature? This course explores the very nature of what cyberculture is, and looks at various aspects of this culture - computers, coders and hackers, online communities, cyber-commerce, digitization, e-mail, and so on. Students study how essayists, novelists, and dramatists have raised fundamental questions about the nature and effects of digitization upon our society.Ideal for students interested in: Business, Communications, and Computer Science. Prereq: ENGL 401 (with a B or better). Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL #415A, ENGL #415B, ENGL 415C, ENGL 415D, ENGL 415F, ENGL #415G, ENGL 415J

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #415G - Literature and the Visual Arts

Credits: 4

This course considers how the sister arts communicate with each other, how writers -- sometimes sassy, sometimes ecstatic -- talk back to paintings, and how painters -- and artists in other mediums -- find inspiration in myth, poetry, and the written word. Students discuss a range of questions that result from such an investigation. Ideal for students interested in: Art, Humanities, Communications, and Theater and Dance. Prereq: ENGL 401 (with a B or better).

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL #415A, ENGL #415B, ENGL 415C, ENGL 415D, ENGL #415E, ENGL 415F, ENGL 415J

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 419 - How to Read Anything

Credits: 4

Whether epic or tweet, song lyric or script, English 419 prepares you for close, detailed, and critical readings and for writing with clarity and precision. You’ll discover selected prose, poetry, plays and films from across the English-speaking world throughout history. Whatever your major, this course develops skills in research, writing, and critical thinking. Prerequisite (with minimum grade of C) for declaring one of the four majors or two options offered in the English Department.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 419H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 440A - On Race in Culture and Society

Credits: 4

Of our special concern will be the claim that race is a culturally or socially, not biologically, constructed category. The reading list will include literary texts (Toni Morrison's "Recitatif"), works of African American comedians (Bill Cosby, Richard Pryor, Eddie Murphy, etc.), philosophical texts (Immanuel Kant, W.E.B. DuBois, K.A. Appiah, etc.) as well as some legal documents (recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions concerning affirmative action). We will also do two case studies, one on the name of Redskins and one the Whiteness Project. The general goal of the course is to improve the student's ability to speak and think critically about race and race relations in the U.S. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Honors course; Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 440B - Honors/Seeing is Believing: How the Copernican Revolution Changed the Way We See Ourselves

Credits: 4

This course explores the various ways that scientists, philosophers, poets, novelists, and literary theorists have tried to reconcile what we see (or think we see) with what we know (or think we know), from the ancient past to the 21st century. Our special focus will be on how the Copernican Revolution prompted a wholesale reevaluation of perception and knowledge. We will explore how writers, artists musicians, and philosophers embraced or lamented the enormous cultural and psychological changes that the Copernican evolution helped to introduce. We also will investigate how these changes continue to shape our worldview in the 21st-century.

Attributes: Honors course; Humanities(Disc)

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #441 - On Race and Culture in Society

Credits: 4

Of our special concern will be the claim that race is a culturally or socially, not biologically, constructed category. The reading list will include literary texts (Toni Morrison's "Recitatif"), works of African American comedians (Bill Cosby, Richard Pryor, Eddie Murphy, etc.), philosophical text (Immanuel Kant, W.E.B. DuBois, K.A. Applah, etc) as well as some legal documents (recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions concerning affirmative action). We will also do two case studies, one on the name of the Redskins and one on the Whiteness Project. The general goal of the course is to improve the student's ability to speak and think critically about race and race relations in the U.S.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 444D - Irish Identity

Credits: 4

Explores the historical causes and literary effects of emigration from Ireland to other regions in the North and South Atlantic. Considers the political and economic conditions of Ireland itself and asks how Irish identities are first formed dialectically through contact with indigenous others and then nostalgically constituted through the experience of migration. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #444G - Ethnic America: Readings in African American, Asian American, NativeAmerican and Latino/a Literature

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to literature by and about African Americans, Asian Americans, Natives, and Latino/as. It introduces approaches in American Studies that will guide students in understanding and appreciating what we call ethnic literature. Secondary sources might include readings in and about ideological criticism, historical analysis, race and ethnic studies, multicultural education, formal narrative, and genre analysis. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 444N - Monsters!!!

Credits: 4

This course will introduce students to a number of critical thinking processes by examining one of the most symbolically significant human archetypes, Monsters. By engaging works of historical significance and popular texts, students will explore a familiar subject from historical, political, psychological, and literary points of view. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 501 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

Credits: 4

A writing course that explores types of creative nonfiction such as nature writing, the profile, the memoir, and the personal essay. Extensive reading of contemporary authors to study the sources and techniques used in creative nonfiction. Regular papers, conferences, and workshops. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 501H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 502 - Professional and Technical Writing

Credits: 4

A writing course introducing students to the effective communication of technical information through various workplace documents including resumes, memos, business letters, reports, brochures, etc. Special emphasis on an introduction to professional conventions and genres and to the transferable skills of rhetorical and audience analysis, document design and collaborative work. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 502H, ET 625

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 503 - Persuasive Writing

Credits: 4

Writing of all types of persuasive nonfiction prose, including argumentative essays and position papers. Special attention to argumentative structures and analysis of audiences. Weekly papers of varying lengths and formats, frequent conferences. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 504 - Resume Writing

Credits: 2

Write your resume now! Readings from recruiters, scholars, and managers reveal what employers want in resumes and cover letters, and what they don't want. Topics include: understanding ATS (applicant tracking systems); analyzing purpose and audience; learning cutting-edge designs; writing detailed and efficient content; tailoring your resume to the job advertisement; writing persuasive cover letters; and formatting and editing tips. Students will identify two job advertisements and write a resume and letter for each. Cr/F.

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail

ENGL 510 - Introduction to the Digital Humanities

Credits: 4

Digital methods can greatly intensify our understanding of literary works, non-fiction writing, film and many other modes of expression in the humanities. This course introduces students to the methods of thought, research and argumentation that digital technology makes possible. These may include identifying quantifiable language patterns, working with archival documents, mapping locations in written works, illuminating historical works, creating digital visualizations of texts, or working with translation tools and concordances. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 511 - Major Writers in English

Credits: 4

In-depth study and discussion of a few American and/or British writers. Topics and approaches vary depending on instructors. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 512 - British Literature I Age of Heroes: Beowulf to Dr. Faustus

Credits: 4

An introduction to the earliest poetry, prose and drama in English, considered in chronological order and in historical context. Examine important literary works as the old English epic Beowulf, Chaucer's entertaining collection Canterbury Tales, the Arthurian romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the devotional autobiography The Book of Margery Kempe, the sermon in dramatic form Everyman, Edmund's Spenser's chivalric saga The Faerie Queen and the sonnets of Philip Sidney and William Shakespeare. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #513 - British Literature II Age of Revolutions: Shakespeare to Austen

Credits: 4

The English literary tradition from the Renaissance to the early Romantics spans a period of great social tumult. It includes civil war, new ideas in science, theology, and politics, and expanding British power abroad. Amidst such change flourished reinvented classical genres like the epic, satire, and stage comedy, as well as new forms like the novel, the pamphlet and the newspaper. This class provides a brisk survey of the revolutionary literature of this fascinating age.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Equivalent(s): ENGL 513H, ENGL 513W

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 513W - British Literature II Age of Revolutions: Shakespeare to Austen

Credits: 4

The English literary tradition from the Renaissance to the early Romantics spans a period of great social tumult. It includes civil war, new ideas in science, theology, and politics, and expanding British power abroad. Amidst such change flourished reinvented classical genres like the epic, satire, and stage comedy, as well as new forms like the novel, the pamphlet and the newspaper. This class provides a brisk survey of the revolutionary literature of this fascinating age.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENG 513H, ENGL #513

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 514 - British Literature III: Revolts, Renewals, Migrations

Credits: 4

Encounter the Romantic fantasies of John Keats's nature poetry and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the Victorian novels that brought us Jane Eyre, Ebenezer Scrooge and Mr. Hyde, the experiments of Modernists like Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, and Postmodern transformations by a shifting cast of contemporaries. We'll read these works in the context of imperial expansion and contraction, the crises of world wars, and the civil rights and independence struggles of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Equivalent(s): ENGL 514H, ENGL 514W

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 514W - British Literature III: Revolts, Renewals, Migrations

Credits: 4

Encounter the Romantic fantasies of John Keats's nature poetry and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the Victorian novels that brought us Jane Eyre, Ebenezer Scrooge and Mr. Hyde, the experiments of Modernists like Virginia Woolf and James Joyce, and Postmodern transformations by a shifting cast of contemporaries. We'll read these works in the context of imperial expansion and contraction, the crises of world wars, and the civil rights and independence struggles of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 514, ENGL 514H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 515W - American Literature I Conquest and Nation: First Contact to the Civil War

Credits: 4

Read texts from the English settlement of North America to the founding of the U.S. and to the national crisis of the Civil War. Encounter an astonishing range of voices in exploration accounts, sermons, captivity narratives, Native American writings, Revolutionary texts, autobiographies, fiction, nature writing, slave narratives, and poetry. The course offers students knowledge of the formative period of American literature and experience in textual analysis through reading and writing about multiple genres. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 516 - American Literature II Money, Migration, and Modernity: Huck Finn to Beloved

Credits: 4

Students will discuss novels, plays, poems, and essays that address the difficult issues of national rebuilding, the temptations of a new consumer culture, the devastations of numerous ward fought overseas, and encounters with European, Jewish, Latin American, and Asian immigrants. Whether comparing nineteenth-century Huckleberry Finn with twentieth-century Beloved or making sense of modern and postmodern literary playfulness, students will become thoughtful readers and writers.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Equivalent(s): ENGL 516H, ENGL 516W

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 516W - American Literature II Money, Migration, and Modernity: Huck Finn to Beloved

Credits: 4

Students will discuss novels, plays, poems, and essays that address the difficult issues of national rebuilding, the temptations of a new consumer culture, the devastations of numerous wars fought overseas, and encounters with European, Jewish, Latin American, and Asian immigrants. Whether comparing nineteenth-century Huckleberry Finn with twentieth-century Beloved or making sense of modern and postmodern literary playfulness, students will become thoughtful readers and writers. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 516, ENGL 516H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 517 - Black Creative Expression

Credits: 4

What is African American culture? What defines it? This course surveys the diverse forms of African American creative expression, from literature and music to theatre and the visual arts Set against the historical backdrop of the slave trade, Civil War, and the black freedom movement, we will examine how writers, artists, and performers have engaged the African American experience of home and family; life and death; past and future.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): AMST 502, ENGL 517H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 518W - Bible as Literature

Credits: 4

Have you ever wanted to read the Bible to gain a better understanding of history, religion, and the arts? Do you want to be able to discuss current religious and political issues in a Biblically informed way? Or maybe you just want bragging rights. Approaching the Bible as a literary work, this course investigates the intense and complicated emotional relationship between God and humanity. For people of faith, some faith, or no faith.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 518, ENGL 518H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 520 - Dystopian and Post-Apocalyptic Fiction

Credits: 4

What’s behind the explosion of the dystopian and post-apocalyptic subgenres in the past decade? How do these seer-like representations of the future revisit older narrative traditions? We will discover why these prophetic forms--straddling the realms of science, politics, literature, and psychology--are at the forefront of the popular imagination. Assignments include blog posts, an op-ed, an imitative style exercise, and participation in online group chats from which you have a wide selection of times.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 521 - Nature Writers

Credits: 4

Literary non-fiction writings by naturalists on natural environments. The course explores questions about what is "nature" or "natural" and why are they valued? What is sought, exploited, abused, known in "nature"? What does nature writing achieve or relieve? What might it teach us as writers and planetary citizens? Is nature or nature writing raced? Gendered? Gilbert White, Henry David Thoreau, Emerson, Muir, Carson, and a diversity of others.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 521H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 526 - Introduction to Fiction Writing

Credits: 4

Writing fiction asks us to say: who am I? What's happening in the world around me? Awakening to the story in your life, and thus to your own imagination, will change your life. Repeatedly, we see fiction writers find their power as creative people. You might become the head of a major corporation! You might just write a great novel or short story. Or just be happier. Join us: write stories, change your life. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 527 - Introduction to Poetry Writing

Credits: 4

Writing poetry is training for life - its practice deepens both the liveliness and rigor of the mind. This course is run in a workshop/discussion format - it uses innovative exercises, guided prompts, language games, and readings that teach the basics of craft, while showing you how to think like a writer, opening up to the pleasures and surprises of the creative process. No prior experience necessary. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 533 - Introduction to Film Studies

Credits: 4

A survey of the international development of the motion picture from the silent period to the present, emphasizing film's narrative practices. Introduces students to the study of the art, history, technology, economics, and theory of cinema. Films and film makers of various nations, periods, movements, and genres examined. Mandatory weekly screenings in addition to class. Students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 533 and CMN 550.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Equivalent(s): CMN 550, ENGL 533H, ENGL 533W

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 534 - 21st Century Journalism: How the News Works

Credits: 4

This class explores ways new technology, including social media, has affected the practice of journalism, and examines journalism past and present. Students discuss libel law, ethics and how to define plagiarism in the digital age. This survey is meant not only to lay a foundation for prospective journalists, but also to provide a broad understanding of the news media for those interested in how the news works.

Attributes: Environment,TechSociety(Disc)

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 549 - In the Groove: African American Music as Literature

Credits: 4

This is a music appreciation course that focuses on getting students into, behind, and under "the groove" of African American music and its intellectual traditions of black pride, power, and cultural expressivity. This course will contain a broad introduction to African American music origins but it will also consider the impact of cultural contexts such as slavery and Euro-American musical influences on African American culture. Students will gain new appreciation for the multi-faceted and wide-ranging ways in which African American music is performed how this music has helped unite one nation under its soulful groove.

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery)

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 550 - Introduction to the Literature and Culture of Race

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to readings across the field of ethnic literature and culture in order to form their capacity to speak and think critically about race relations in America. Readings will include those in race theory, racial construction and authenticity, histories of raced subjects in America, the rise of ethnic studies, white ignorance and whiteness studies, the intersectionality of race with gender, sexual orientation, economic class, religion, and faith. Includes Asian American, African American, Native, and Latino/a literature.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 555 - Science Fiction

Credits: 4

This course examines stories, novels, and film from the popular genre of science fiction. A variety of literary critical approaches are deployed to discuss a number of key authors and texts from the nineteenth century to the present.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Equivalent(s): ENGL 555H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #557 - Crime and Espionage

Credits: 4

This course examines stories, novels, and film from the popular genre of Crime Fiction and Espionage. A variety of literary critical approaches are deployed to discuss a number of key authors and texts from the nineteenth century to the present.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 560 - Introduction to Latinx Literature and Culture

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the field of Latinx literature and culture in order to develop the ability to speak and think critically about race relations in the USA. Course readings will be drawn from texts produced primarily in English by individuals of Latin American descent. Readings may include immigration and borderlands discourse, art, music, television and film, histories of Latinx subjects in America, and the intersectionality of race with gender, sexual orientation, economic class and religion. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 565 - Literary Dublin: Short-Term Study Abroad

Credits: 4

This short-term study abroad experience begins in the states by Zoom meetings, then moves overseas to Dublin. Through writing, reading, on-site visits, and a host of lectures by guest speakers from English, History, anthropology, and migrant studies, students will gain an appreciation of Ireland's many challenges of self-and other identity related to its location, colonization, religions, and global immigration. The predominantly twenty-and twenty-first-century course selections are brought to life on site. Prereq: 3.25 GPA and 32 credits. Special Fee.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 575 - Sex and Sensibility: The Rise of Chick Lit

Credits: 4

This course examines the courtship novel, with an emphasis on female protagonists. How have various writers addressed the institution of marriage and long-term commitment, and the role finances play in partner choice? We'll start with the novels of Jane Austen and move to contemporary "chick lit", the latest incarnation of the romantic quest narrative, in order to understand this genre's continuing popularity. Assignments include blogs, online chats, research essays, and creative writing opportunities.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 581 - Reading the Postcolonial Experience

Credits: 4

Modern South Asia and Africa have been shaped by their history of colonization. What is it like to live in places once dominated by foreigners, then reshaped by nationalisms and various injustices intensified by globalization? In this course, we’ll read literary depictions that illuminate the lives, dreams, joys, hates, and failures of individuals and groups in these places, exploring both ordinary life and extraordinary experiences created by dispossession, political tyranny, civil war, and environmental trauma.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 581H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 585 - Introduction to Women in Literature

Credits: 4

The goal of this course is to examine women's roles in literary traditions, including women as authors and women as characters. We interrogate categories of sex, gender, and sexuality as they intersect with other categories of identity including race, class, and nation. Specific topics differ each semester according to the individual instructor. Recent semesters have included "Jewish Women Writers" and "Female Authors of the Mystery Novel". May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 585H, ENGL 585R

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 585R - Introduction to Women in Literature

Credits: 4

The goal of this course is to examine women's roles in literary traditions, including women as authors and women as characters. We interrogate categories of sex, gender, and sexuality as they intersect with other categories of identity including race, class, and nation. Specific topics differ each semester according to the individual instructor. Recent semesters have included "Jewish Women Writers" and "Female Authors of the Mystery Novel". May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 585

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 595 - Literary Topics

Credits: 4

Investigate in depth a literary topic of particular interest, in a course specially designed for both majors and non-majors. Themes vary from semester to semester--recent topics include the contemporary short story, Irish literature, animals in literature, and the literature of the Vietnam War. See the English Department for details of current offerings. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 595H, ENGL 595W

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 600 - English for International Students

Credits: 1-4

Designed for international students to provide additional support in course work. Students continue to develop skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in English. No letter grades. Prereq: permission from ESL Institute. Cr/F. Writing intensive. Credits received for this course can help satisfy the requirements for student visa, but they will normally not count towards a graduate degree. Students are encouraged to check with their individual academic advisors.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits.

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail

ENGL 602 - Advanced Professional and Technical Writing

Credits: 4

An advanced writing course focusing on writing in a global and technological workplace. In addition to fluency in the documents of the workplace, students focus on visual rhetoric in a technological environment through web design and usability while studying the issues of globalism, ethics, and the environment that affect all professional writing today.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 605 - Intermediate Linguistic Analysis

Credits: 4

Introduces analysis methods and problem solving in phonology, morphology, and syntax using data from many languages. Emphasis will be both practical (learning how to describe the grammar and sound system of a language) and theoretical (understanding languages' behavior). Prereq: ENGL 405/LING 405, or permission. (Also offered as LING 605.)

Equivalent(s): LING 605

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 606 - Languages of the World

Credits: 4

A survey of the languages of the world from genetic, areal, and typological perspectives. Students learn about the geographic and demographic distribution of language families and language isolates, as well as about structural characteristics of languages, language families and language areas. Additional topics include language endangerment and the question of linguistic universals. Students work collaboratively on a project investigating a particular language family, giving in class presentations and writing up a final project report. Some prior knowledge of phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax is necessary. Prereq: ENGL 605/LING 605 or ENGL 405/LING 405 and permission of the instructor.

Equivalent(s): LING 606

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 609 - Ethnicity in America: The African American Experience in the 20th Century

Credits: 4

Investigation of the music, literature, and social history of African American America in the period of the Harlem Renaissance, in the Great Depression, World War II, and in the 1960s. Special attention to the theme of accommodation with and rejection of dominant white culture.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): AMST 609, HUMA 609

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 616A - Studies in Film/Genre

Credits: 4

Advanced, focused study of the narrative, dramatic, and poetic practices of cinema, within one of four possible subject areas: A) Genre; B) Authorship; C) Culture and Ideology; D) Narrative and Style. Precise issues and methods may vary, ranging from general and specific considerations of how a given subject area involves film theory, criticism, and history, to its use in diverse analyses of selected national cinemas, periods, movements, and filmmakers. May be repeated for credit barring duplication of topic. Barring duplication of material taken for credit in CMN 650, course may be repeated for credit. Detailed course descriptions available in the English department office.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): AMST 605, ENGL 616

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 616B - Studies in Film/Authorship

Credits: 4

Advanced, focused study of the narrative, dramatic, and poetic practices of cinema, within one of four possible subject areas: A) Genre; B) Authorship; C) Culture and Ideology; D) Narrative and Style. Precise issues and methods may vary, ranging from general and specific considerations of how a given subject area involves film theory, criticism, and history, to its use in diverse analyses of selected national cinemas, periods, movements, and filmmakers. May be repeated for credit barring duplication of topic. Barring duplication of material taken for credit in CMN 650, course may be repeated for credit. Detailed course descriptions available in the English department office.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): AMST 605, ENGL 616

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 616C - Studies in Film/Culture and Ideology

Credits: 4

Advanced, focused study of the narrative, dramatic, and poetic practices of cinema, within one of four possible subject areas: A) Genre; B) Authorship; C) Culture and Ideology; D) Narrative and Style. Precise issues and methods may vary, ranging from general and specific considerations of how a given subject area involves film theory, criticism, and history, to its use in diverse analyses of selected national cinemas, periods, movements, and filmmakers. May be repeated for credit barring duplication of topic. Barring duplication of material taken for credit in CMN 650, course may be repeated for credit. Detailed course descriptions available in the English department office.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): AMST 605, ENGL 616

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 616D - Studies in Film/Narrative and Style

Credits: 4

Advanced, focused study of the narrative, dramatic, and poetic practices of cinema, within one of four possible subject areas: A) Genre; B) Authorship; C) Culture and Ideology; D) Narrative and Style. Precise issues and methods may vary, ranging from general and specific considerations of how a given subject area involves film theory, criticism, and history, to its use in diverse analyses of selected national cinemas, periods, movements, and filmmakers. May be repeated for credit barring duplication of topic. Barring duplication of material taken for credit in CMN 650, course may be repeated for credit. Detailed course descriptions available in the English department office.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): AMST 605, ENGL 616

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 618 - Film Theory

Credits: 4

Examines basic theories of film and their relationship to the practice of close analysis of film. Theories are meant to provide students with a vocabulary for critical analysis and stress the many ways of seeing film.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 620 - English Major Internship

Credits: 1-4

Open to all English majors. Internships allow students to use skills learned in the major in a supervised work setting. In addition to the job experience, the English major internship requires research and writing assignments overseen by a faculty sponsor. These supplementary assignments must be outlined in a written proposal describing the work involved in the internship and how it relates to the student's academic training. Registration requires permission from the employer, faculty sponsor, major advisor, and department chairperson. The employer must be an established organization approved by Career Services. This course does not count toward the English major or substitute for English 720, the Journalism Internship. Cr/F.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail

ENGL 621 - Newswriting

Credits: 4

Students get a strong journalistic foundation with hands-on experience reporting and writing compelling news stories for print and digital platforms. Skills taught include finding news stories and tracking down sources; conducting interviews and verifying facts; and drafting and revising stories. Prereq: ENGL 401, ENGL 534 and permission of the instructor. ENGL 621 may be taken more than once for credit with the approval of the Journalism Program Director, up to a maximum of 8.00 credits. Students must fill out a Permission to Repeat an English Course For Credit form, available in the department office.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 623 - Creative Nonfiction

Credits: 4

Intensive writing course emphasizing the blend of basic elements that constitute creative nonfiction: research, observation, and personal experience. Also readings and discussion of some of the best published creative nonfiction. Prereq: ENGL 501, 526, 527 or permission of the instructor. May be taken more than once for credit, recommended with two different instructors.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 625 - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop

Credits: 4

Students continue to explore the aspects of fiction writing. Through short exercises students learn to create visual scenes, integrate exposition with dramatic scene, and construct convincing characters in believable situations. We'll continue to explore the basic elements of what makes a short story, such as point of view, dialogue, dramatization, voice, meaning, language. Students write short stories and significantly revise them. Through discussion of student writing in a workshop format, as well as reading and responding to short stories by published authors, we'll address the questions: What is a short story? How do we create a world in which the reader is fully involved? Where does the story evoke emotion or meaning? Prereq: ENGL 501, 526, 527 or permission of the instructor. ENGL 625 may be taken more than once for credit, recommended with two different instructors.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 625A - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop: Screenwriting

Credits: 4

In this course, intermediate creative writers will learn the craft of writing scripts for film and television. Students will continue to explore the elements of effective storytelling by writing and significantly revising loglines, outlines, and complete short screenplays. The course will combine in-depth analysis of classic and contemporary screenplays (including shorts, teleplays, and feature-length films) with lectures, writing exercises, and peer workshops. Topics will include dramatic structure, professional formatting and planning, and how to develop vividly compelling characters, scenes, conflict and dialogue. The aim of the course will not be to simply reinforce existing narrative principles but rather to test the validity of existing conventions. Throughout we will address the questions: What makes a story relevant, moving, thrilling, or meaningful? Why does this story need to be told visually? What makes a great script great? Prereq: ENGL 501, ENGL 526 or ENGL 527 or Permission of the Instructor. Course may be repeated up to a maximum of 8 credits.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 627 - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop

Credits: 4

Workshop discussion of poems written by students, with focus on more complex techniques and forms. Individual conferences with instructor. Prereq: ENGL 501, 526, 527 or permission of the instructor. ENGL 627 may be taken more than once for credit, recommended with two different instructors.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 631 - Digital Reporting

Credits: 4

This course immerses students in the digital news landscape and teaches them to report across multiple platforms. Students learn reporting tools and strategies for producing dynamic digital journalism. Prereq: ENGL 534, ENGL 621 with a 'B' or better and written permission of the instructor. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 531

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 636 - Literature and the Environment

Credits: 4

How do writers represent the environment? What’s at stake in those depictions? Includes both literary and critical readings.Topics may vary and engage different historical periods: women and environmental justice, the urban environment, postcolonial environmental writers. Interdisciplinary perspectives (drawn from history, geography, visual arts, media studies, etc.) may inform the discussion of the readings. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 650 - I Hear America Singing: Studying American Literature and Culture

Credits: 4

Examine unique themes, theories, and works of art in American Studies that are not offered on a regular basis. This course explores the intersection of literature and medicine; as well as comics and graphic narrative; music and social protest, photography and nonfiction; the literature of Stonewall. Learn how to approach the proposed subject, its specialized vocabulary, history and politics in its pages, and its value for the contemporary moment. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): AMST 603, ENGL 650R

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 650R - I Hear America Singing: Studying American Literature and Culture

Credits: 4

Examine unique themes, theories, and works of art in American Studies that are not offered on a regular basis. This course explores the intersection of literature and medicine; as well as comics and graphic narrative; music and social protest, photography and nonfiction; the literature of Stonewall. Learn how to approach the proposed subject, its specialized vocabulary, history and politics in its pages, and its value for the contemporary moment. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): AMST 603, ENGL 650

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 655 - Reading in all Directions: Comics and Graphic Narrative

Credits: 4

"Reading happens in all directions," says Hilary Chute about the study of comics and graphic narrative. In this course, students will learn to read images and texts from all directions: up, down, horizontally, vertically, across panels and jacket flaps, in seriality and on the internet. Comics' ability to represent both trauma and the trivial takes students from newspaper funnies to the Holocaust, from superheroes in mid-century floppies to Underground comix and current autobiographical comics, comics journalism, comics history, and fiction.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 657 - Shakespeare

Credits: 4

An introduction to the main periods of Shakespeare's playwriting career, addressing representative works from each of the genres in which he wrote (tragedy, comedy, history, romance). We will discuss such matters as a Renaissance theater architecture and performance conventions, Shakespeare's poetic language, the representation of women, commoners and minorities on stage, royal power and court politics, love, sex, religion, and revenge. Live and filmed performances will be included as available. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 657H

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 681 - Contemporary African Literature

Credits: 4

What was the first African novel in English? Should African writers write in the language of erstwhile colonizers? What is literature's function in corrupt autocracies? What was theatre like under aparthied? Who are the New South Africa’s major writers? We’ll explore answers to these and many other questions. Marked by colonial history and cultural exchanges between Africans, Arabs, Europeans and Asians, postcolonial African literature will challenge your understanding of Africa and of literature itself.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 690 - African American Literature

Credits: 4

Whether in poetry and prose, or fiction and nonfiction, what issues have occupied African American writers and readers? What joy do these writers and readers derive from the written word and oral tradition? Motivated by these questions, this class traces the origins of an African American literary tradition in British North American; charts the circulation of ideas about democracy and citizenship in the nineteenth-century United States; and maps ongoing debates about race and representation today.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 693 - Special Topics in Literature

Credits: 4

A) Old English Literature, B) Medieval Literature, C) 16th Century, D) 17th Century, E) 18th Century, F) English Romantic Period, G) Victorian Period, H) 20th Century, I) Drama, J) Novel, K) Poetry, L) Nonfiction, M) American Literature, N) A Literary Problem, O) Literature of the Renaissance, R) Race and Racial Theories. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details, see course descriptions available in the English department. (Not offered every year.) Special fee on some topics. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 2 times.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 693R - Special Topics in Literature

Credits: 4

A) Old English Literature, B) Medieval Literature, C) 16th Century, D) 17th Century, E) 18th Century, F) English Romantic Period, G) Victorian Period, H) 20th Century, I) Drama, J) Novel, K) Poetry, L) Nonfiction, M) American Literature, N) A Literary Problem, O) Literature of the Renaissance, R) Race and Racial Theories. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details, see course descriptions available in the English department. (Not offered every year). Special fee on some topics.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 693

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 694 - Special Topics in Creative Writing

Credits: 4

Courses offered under this number feature a variety of topics having to do with creative writing. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English Department.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 701 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop

Credits: 4

Students come to this course with a firm grasp of all the elements of fiction, ready to write short stories that construct convincing characters in believable situations. In a workshop format, students give and receive critiques on classmates' work. Significant revisions of short stories and thorough discussions of work by published authors will round out the course as students continue to explore the art of writing the short story. Students are responsible for leading discussion of published stories. Prereq: ENGL 625 with a grade of B or better. ENGL 701 may be taken more than once for credit, recommended with two different instructors.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 703T - Travel Writing

Credits: 4

A workshop devoted to reading and writing and writing narratives of place. Travel writing requires the author to research and reflect, exploring both the external--the place--and the internal--the author's experience. Students write multiple travel pieces and read widely essays of place by writers such as John Steinbeck, Joan Didion, Pico Iyer and Eliza Griswold. Permission of instructor required. Prereq: ENGL 501, ENGL 621 or ENGL 623.

Co-requisite: INCO 589

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 703

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 710 - Teaching Writing

Credits: 4

This course will introduce you both to the theories and practices of teaching writing in middle and high school at a time of increased accountability. The course is designed for students who are interested in exploring teaching as a possible career. In the course we will try out varied literacy activities and study teaching writing using a process approach. We discuss different approaches to planning instruction and various forms of writing assessment, including state-wide tests. Open to juniors and seniors only. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 711 - Editing

Credits: 4

Survey of newspaper and news website editing, covering topics ranging from grammar and style to headline writing to ethics. Prereq: ENGL 621 with a minimum grade of B and written permission of instructor.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 712 - Multimedia Storytelling

Credits: 4

In this course, students explore the theory and practice of visual storytelling -- including composition, lighting, editing and more -- to produce short yet vibrant journalistic video documentaries. Students learn to shoot and edit audio and video. They explore narrative techniques and structure. They broaden their reportorial range, bringing visual sensitivity to storytelling. Prereq: ENGL 621 and ENGL 631 and permission of the instructor.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 714 - Critical Skills

Credits: 4

This course provides training in critical analysis of various texts (literature, film, and media). Criticism is often applied to the hot-button issues of the day. We ask questions like: How does gender shape the way we read? How to interpret texts in a globalized world? Does the truth matter? This course satisfies a post-1800 literature requirement for English Department majors; may be taken for elective credit by English Teaching Majors. Prereq: ENGL 419 or equivalent.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 617

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 715 - Teaching English as a Second Language: Theory and Methods

Credits: 4

A course on the linguistic, psychological, and sociological theories that inform our understanding of language acquisition and current best practices in the teaching of ESOL. Provides an overview of first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, learner individual differences (e.g., age, motivation, aptitude, learning strategies), and sociocultural contexts of ESL teaching and learning.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 716 - Curriculum, Materials and Assessment in English as a Second Language

Credits: 4

A hands-on approach to developing curriculum and course material for teaching English as a Second Language. Students work on lesson plan development (needs analysis, objective writing, task sequencing, assessment of proficiency and objective), conduct ESL classroom observations, and engage in teaching demonstrations.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 717 - Languages in Contact

Credits: 4

This course will explore topics related to languages in contact, including borrowing, code-switching, second language acquisition, bilingual mixed languages, language shift and maintenance, pidgins and creoles, and the linguistic and social factors which play a role in language contact. Prereq: ENGL 405 or LING 405 or permission of instructor.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): LING 717

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 718 - Morphology

Credits: 4

Morphology is the study of word formation and the mental lexicon. This course explores processes of derivation, compounding and inflection that allow us to form new words. Students will become proficient in analyzing word formation processes in English and other languages, including deploying terminology used by morphologists. Students will learn and practice the conversations of "writing like a linguist". Prereq: ENGL 405 or LING 405.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): LING 718

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 719 - Sociolinguistics Survey

Credits: 4

How language varies according to the characteristics of its speakers: age, sex, ethnicity, attitude, time, and class. Quantitative analysis methods; relationship to theoretical linguistics. Focus is on English, but some other languages are examined. Prereq: ENGL or LING 405 (previously numbered 505) or permission.

Equivalent(s): LING 719

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 720 - Journalism Internship

Credits: 1-16

Students intending to pursue careers in journalism spend a semester working full or part time, reporting and writing, editing or producing content for a news organization. Pre-req: ENGL 621 with a B or better, ENGL 631 and permission of the ENGL 631 instructor.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 721 - Advanced Reporting

Credits: 4

While the theme of this course is teaching students advanced techniques of writing and reporting, each semester the course is offered it focuses on different areas of journalism. One semester, students may learn multimedia reporting - storytelling across multiple platforms, including video and audio - and in other semesters the course may focus on sportswriting. Yet in others, students will develop their news reporting skills. The course may be taken multiple times for credit with the approval of the Journalism Program Director. Prereq: 'B' or better in ENGL 621 and written permission of instructor.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 722 - Feature Writing

Credits: 4

An intermediate workshop that asks students to report in greater depth and experiment with different storytelling methods. Prereq: B or better in ENGL 621 and permission of the instructor.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 723 - Issues in Journalism

Credits: 4

This upper-level seminar focuses on the shifts in technology and public perception that are changing the definition of excellence in journalism. Special attention to legal and ethical issues reshaping journalism's public service role. Prereq: Grade of B in ENGL 621 and written permission. May be repeated once for credit with permission of the journalism director.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #724 - Sports Writing

Credits: 4

This class immerses students in all aspects of professional sports writing. Using in-class and real-world assignments, the class exposes students to such practical applications as covering live events; feature writing; covering breaking news; column writing/blogging; and writing a running game story on a real-time deadline. Prereq: ENGL 621 Newswriting with a 'B' or better.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 725 - Seminar in English Teaching

Credits: 4

In this seminar on teaching English at the middle- and secondary-school levels, students meet the requirements for both English 710, Teaching Writing and English 792, Teaching Secondary School English. The two-semester course integrates the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, and listening, addressing both theoretical and practical issues. Through the study of different approaches, students develop their own philosophies of instruction. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 725L - Seminar in English Teaching: Lab

Credits: 2

Classroom and research lab experiences give English Teaching majors enrolled in the Seminar in English Teaching opportunities to put their pedagogical and theoretical readings into practice and grow as teachers. This Lab should be taken simultaneously with ENGL 725. Students must have JR or SR status at the start of the course. Permission of instructor required.

Co-requisite: ENGL 725

Equivalent(s): ENGL 810S

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail

ENGL 726 - Seminar in English Teaching

Credits: 4

In this seminar on teaching English at the middle- and secondary-school levels, students meet the requirements for both English 710, Teaching Writing and English 792, Teaching Secondary School English. The two-semester course integrates the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, and listening, addressing both theoretical and practical issues. Through the study of different approaches, students develop their own philosophies of instruction. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 726L - Sem in English Teaching: Lab

Credits: 2

Classroom and research lab experiences give English Teaching majors enrolled in the Seminar in English Teaching opportunities to put their pedagogical and theoretical readings into practice and grow as teachers. This lab should be taken simultaneously with ENGL 726. Students must have JR or SR status at the start of the course. Permission of instructor required.

Co-requisite: ENGL 726

Equivalent(s): ENGL 892S

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail

ENGL 727 - Issues in Second Language Writing

Credits: 4

Study of various issues in second language writing theory, research, instruction and administration. Topics include the characteristics and needs of second language writers, second language writing processes, contrastive rhetoric, grammar instruction, teacher and peer feedback, assessment, course design and placement. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 729 - Special Topics in Composition Studies

Credits: 4

Advanced course on a topic chosen by the instructor. Precise topics and methods of each section vary. Possible topics include alternative discourses and rhetorics, contrastive rhetoric, electronic discourse and digital rhetoric, women's rhetorics and feminist pedagogies, Montaigne and the essay tradition, theories of literacy, theories of persuasive writing, theories of transactional writing, and written discourse analysis. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details see descriptions available in the English Department. Writing intensive when topic is studies in rhetoric and composition.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 730 - Practicum in Teaching English and the Language Arts

Credits: 1-6

A site-based course for practicing teachers that features in-class observations and demonstrations, individual consultation, and group meetings in the schools. Prereq: permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 921

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 735 - Entrepreneurial Journalism

Credits: 4

This course teaches journalism students to think like business people so they can compete in the exploding world of online publishing. Students work on ways to monetize good journalism practices by studying opportunities available and applying what they learn to a publishing project. Those who prefer print will find the course valuable as they learn to balance business objectives with quality journalism. Prereq: ENGL 621 with a B or better and written permission of the instructor. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 736 - Environmental Theory

Credits: 4

Theoretical approaches to nature writing. Topics vary but may include eco-memoirs, environmental rhetoric, native peoples and the land, land and national identity, animals in literature, and environmental activist non-fiction. May be repeated for credit if topic differs.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #738 - Asian American Studies

Credits: 4

Are you captivated by the stories, histories and experiences of Asian Americans? Do you want to learn about their cultures, struggles, and accomplishments? This course examines the variety and complexity of Asian Americans through literature, poetry, film, essays, photography, music, and web-based presences. Specific course topics, as arranged by the instructor, include the Japanese American internment, the literature of popular culture of the Vietnam War, Asian American graphic narratives, transnational adoption, and food and culture.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): AMST 615

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 739 - American Indian Literature

Credits: 4

Close study of traditional and/or contemporary American Indian literature and folklore with historical and cultural background. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #741 - Early American Literature: Colonialism, Revolution, Nation

Credits: 4

English writings from settlement through the early U.S. (up to 1800): the literature of exploration, conquest, and cross-cultural contact; Puritan sermons, poetry, and a trial; captivity narratives; Native American writings; Enlightenment-era autobiographies, slave narratives, political writing, and fiction. These texts raise crucial issues: religion and violence; settler colonialism; New World race and gender constructions; and the social/textual constructions of nationhood. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 743R - American Literature, 1865-1915: The Birth of the American Empire

Credits: 4

The term millionaire; battles over citizenship; advocating for anarchism; mail order stores; yellow journalism; scientific revolutions; radical new art forms; war abroad and protests at home--and the invention of both the ice-cream cone and intercollegiate athletics: how did writers respond to and shape this tumultuous period in American history? Fiction, nonfiction, poetry; both individual works and historical and critical background. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 743

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #745 - Contemporary American Literature

Credits: 4

Mark Twain supposedly said, “reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated.” So too, American literature. In an era of globalization, what is American? In a digital era, what is literature? Nonetheless, American literature thrives, and American writers continue to produce work that inspires and challenges, exposes and explores, both the most pervasive aspects of modern life and its most isolated corners. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry; individual works and historical and critical background. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #747 - Studies in American Poetry

Credits: 4

Topics vary from year to year. Examples: poets of the open road, Pound and his followers, major American poets, contemporary American poetry. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic. (Not offered every year.)

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 749R - Major American Authors

Credits: 4

How does a writer come to embody a particular moment? This course answers the question by focusing on an individual or community of writers: their work to be sure, but also their biographies; the historical context for the work; the cultural moment in which they participated; and the innovations they brought to their craft. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 749

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #751 - Medieval Romance

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of one of the most unique genres of medieval literature: the romantic epic. From brave knights and marvelous wizards to cunning queens and hungry dragons, the literature of this class gives a fascinating introduction to the imaginative potential of the medieval world. This course also emphasizes how entertainment overlapped with ethical crisis, as romance reinforces social norms of gender and sex, race and religion. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 752 - History of the English Language

Credits: 4

Evolution of English from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. Relations between linguistic change and literary style. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 753 - Old English

Credits: 4

Introduction to Old English language and literature through the reading of selected poetry and prose. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 756 - Chaucer

Credits: 4

Geoffrey Chaucer is one of the most famous poets in the English language - but why? This course offers students and overview of Chaucer's poetry, spending particular time on his masterpiece, "The Canterbury Tales". Sometimes tragic, sometimes bawdy, and almost always humorous, Chaucer’s poetry offers a glimpse of a world long-lost, while simultaneously forcing us to ask hard questions about justice, love, and the nature of human creation. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 758 - Advanced Shakespeare

Credits: 4

This course offers an in-depth look at a few Shakespeare plays, which you’ll study intensively through the lens of a single topic. Topics vary from semester to semester. Recent examples include Shakespeare on Screen, Shakespeare and Race, Shakespeare’s History Plays, Unknown Shakespeare, and Shakespearean Tragedy. Live and filmed performances will be included as available. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 758R - Advanced Shakespeare

Credits: 4

This course offers an in-depth look at a few Shakespeare plays, which you'll study intensively through the lens of a single topic. Topics vary from semester to semester. Recent examples include Shakespeare on Screen, Shakespeare and Race, Shakespeare's History Plays, Unknown Shakespeare, and Shakespearean Tragedy. Live and filmed performances will be included as available. Prereq: ENG 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 758

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 759 - Milton

Credits: 4

Readings include a wide selection of Milton's poetry and prose with a special focus on "Paradise Lost". Milton’s writings contain arguments regarding free will, tyranny, and slavery that inform modern conceptions of civil liberty, republican government, and free speech. In the US Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and other early framers credit "Paradise Lost" as having shaped their ideas of religious and civil liberty in a democratic republic. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 767 - Literature of the Restoration and Early 18th Century

Credits: 4

The English "Restoration" (roughly 1660-1688) was a comparatively free-spirited time following a decade of dogmatic and intolerant evangelical Christian rule. This course studies a variety of literary genres and academic disciplines, the opening of theaters and women performing on stage for the first time, the beginnings of the media, and the rise of scientific Enlightenment. Works by John Dryden, Aphra Behn, Jonathan Swift, and others. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #768 - Literature of the Later 18th Century

Credits: 4

Examines the economic, religious, and political preconditions necessary for the development of imperial Britain while analyzing how the material conditions of slavery and colonialism effectively underwrote the new British identity and literary world of the period. Explores the tension between reason and emotion characteristic of the Enlightenment. Works by Jane Austen, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Wollestonecraft, William Blake, Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and others. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #771 - Victorian Love Poetry

Credits: 4

In this course we discuss beauty, spirituality, objectification, through the emotional power dynamics of love poetry. Looking at 400 years of sonnets, but focusing on 19th century England, we analyze how the ideas about love and relationships this poetic tradition establishes appear in contemporary music, film, art, and social media. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 773 - Literary Modernisms: Return, Revolt, Recycle

Credits: 4

This course focuses on modernist writers such as T.S. Eliot, who sought to revitalize modern culture by looking backward to the past; Virginia Woolf, who experimented with the form of the novel; and performance artist Kabe Wilson, who recycles texts of high modernism. We explore modernist literature in its geopolitical contexts with special attention to imperial expansion and contraction, the rise of fascism, world wars, and struggles for suffrage, and national belonging. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 774R - Modern & Contemporary British Literature: New Departures

Credits: 4

This course celebrates the growing diversity of British literature over the past half century. These years witnessed the final breakup of the British empire, a civil war in Northern Ireland, the rise of Scottish nationalism, and an influx of immigrants from former colonies worldwide. Beginning with the "little Englander" attitudes of the postwar era, we will explore the emergence of postmodern and postcolonial Britain in fiction, graphic narrative, poetry, drama, film and performance. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ENGL 774

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 775 - Modern Irish Literature: A Changing Landscape

Credits: 4

In this course we will explore Irish literature and culture from the Celtic Renaissance in the early twentieth century to the Celtic Tiger of the early twenty-first. Readings will trace Ireland's transformation from and inward-looking agricultural nation to one of the most globalized countries in the world. Recurring themes will include the status of the Church, changing gender roles, sectarian conflict, and Ireland's relation to the world. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 777 - The English Novel in the World

Credits: 4

Novels written in English from Asia and Africa during the mid-twentieth century to the present day. We will discuss shifts from realism to magical realism and back; domestic, historical and speculative fiction; narratives of the rise of new nations and nationalism; experiences of exile and migration; the 'global' city; transnational cultural exchanges and networks that dismantle assumed civilizational boundaries. Newer novels offer opportunities to understand how literary narratives grasp ecological destruction, animal extinction, and human responsibility.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 778 - Race and Gender in Film and Popular Culture

Credits: 4

This course explores representations of race and gender in American cinema and popular culture and features weekly readings in contemporary race and gender theories. Topics include the black women's gaze; woman as object; the action hero and hyper-masculinity; hybridity; race/ethnicity and hypersexuality; the crisis of white masculinity; white privilege; sexual orientation; transsexual and transgender performance. This course is reading and Canvas intensive, requiring weekly writing assignments and papers. It is NOT writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 779 - Linguistic Field Methods

Credits: 4

Study of a non-Indo-European language by eliciting examples from an informant, rather than from written descriptions of the language. Students learn how to figure out the grammar of a language from raw data. Prereq: ENGL 405/LING 405. (Also offered as LING 779). (Not offered every semester).

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): LING 779

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 780 - Drama of Shakespeare's Contemporaries: Will and Company

Credits: 4

Who were Shakespeare's contemporaries in the London theater, his models and mentors, his competitors, compatriots and rivals? Read the plays of those who inspired, fought with, befriended, and followed Shakespeare in one of the great eras of English literature. We'll discuss the development of revenge tragedy, histories and comedy, new styles of acting and theater buildings, presentations of court intrigue, the representation of women and "others", and the changing mores of early London. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 782 - Modern and Contemporary Drama

Credits: 4

An overview of the best writing for the modern stage. We'll survey developments in theater in the past 100 years, sampling such genres as absurdist drama, psychological gothic, "in yer face" theatre, theater that incorporates new media, and work by women, African-American, Latinx, gay and immigrant writers. We'll discuss the changing role of theater in society, identity politics onstage and off, and shock, sex and violence as dramatic techniques. Live and filmed performances as available. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 783 - English Novel of the Eighteenth Century

Credits: 4

The eighteenth-century was the period in which the English made the novel, a hitherto European genre, into their own. Finance, slavery, colonialism, war, and the development of the printing press created the media environment in which this genre could thrive, and women authors quickly came to dominate it. Themes include money and marriage, abolition of slavery, and human sympathy. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 784 - English Novel of the 19th Century

Credits: 4

The highly popular novels of nineteenth-century Britain produced such memorable characters as Sherlock Holmes, Count Dracula, Alice in Wonderland, Frankenstein's monster, and Dr. Jekyll. The novel’s literary engagements with science, love, and the city are entangled with cultural discourses on animals, monstrosity, supernaturalism, degeneration, empire, race, and crime. In this course, students will sample a set of novels that exemplify the distinct generic and thematic innovations of the period. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL #785 - Feminist Literary Traditions

Credits: 4

In this course, we explore writing in English by women from across centuries, continents, and traditions, as well as traditions of feminist literary scholarship. Primary areas of focus will be individuals’ concepts of self and community, women’s involvement in the intellectual and political issues of their times and places, and the role of literature in the processes of social transformation and reform. Prereq: ENGL 401.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 787 - English Major Seminar

Credits: 4

This Capstone course offers you an opportunity to study a specialized topic in depth in a seminar format. Enrollment is limited to 15 so that you can take active part in discussion and work closely with the instructor on a research project. Topics vary from semester to semester. Recent topics include Tragedy, Comedy, American Women Poets, Medicine in Literature, and Feminist Print Culture. Pre-req: ENGL 419 with a grade of B or better. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details see semester specific course descriptions available in the English Department.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 787R

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 787R - English Major Seminar

Credits: 4

This Capstone course offers you an opportunity to study a specialized topic in depth in a seminar format. Enrollment is limited to 15 so that you can take active part in discussion and work closely with the instructor on a research project. Topics vary from semester to semester. Recent topics include Tragedy, Comedy, American Women Poets, Medicine in Literature, and Feminist Print Culture. Pre-req: ENGL 419 with a grade of B or better. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic. For details see semester specific course descriptions available in the English Department.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 787

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 788 - Senior Honors

Credits: 4

Open to senior English majors who, in the opinion of the department, have demonstrated the capacity to do superior work; permission required. An honors project consists of supervised research leading to a substantial thesis or writing of poetry or fiction portfolio. Required of students in the honors in major program. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

Attributes: Honors course; Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 789 - Special Topics in English Teaching

Credits: 4

Advanced theories and practices course on English Teaching. Topics such as A) Teaching Young Adult Literature, C) Teaching English in Diverse Contexts, D) Teaching Drama, N) Teaching Nonfiction, R) English Teachers as Researchers, and T) Alternate Literacies and Teaching Technologies. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details see course descriptions available in the English department.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 790 - Special Topics in Linguistics

Credits: 4

Advanced course on a topic chosen by the instructor. Inquire at the English department office for a full course description each time the course is offered. Topics such as word formation, dialectology, linguistic theory and language acquisition, history of linguistics, language and culture, cross-disciplinary studies relating to linguistics. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. (Also offered as LING 790.) Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): LING 790

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 791 - English Grammar

Credits: 4

An introduction to the terminology and major concepts in English grammar. Covers descriptive vs. prescriptive grammar, parts of speech, phrase structure, clause types, and basic sentence patterns. Useful for pre-service teachers seeking to acquire the background knowledge needed to make informed decisions about teaching of English grammar.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 792 - Teaching Literature and Literacy

Credits: 4

This course introduces theories and practices of teaching literature and literacy, including teaching reading and writing as well as teaching literary analysis at the secondary level. Students also learn to plan lessons, choose texts, and create learning activities for speaking, listening, and viewing in grade five through twelve. The course is designed for students who are interested in teaching as a possible career.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 793 - Phonetics and Phonology

Credits: 4

The sound system of English and other languages as viewed from the standpoint of modern linguistic theory, including the following topics: the acoustic and articulatory properties of speech sounds, the phonemic repertories of particular languages, phonological derivations, and prosodic phenomena such as stress and intonation. (Also offered as LING 793.) Prereq: a basic linguistics course or permission.

Equivalent(s): LING 793

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 794 - Syntax

Credits: 4

Relationship of grammar and meaning as viewed from the standpoint of modern linguistic theory. Emphasizes the syntax and semantics of English, with special attention to the construction of arguments for or against particular analyses. (Also offered as LING 794.) Prereq: a basic linguistics course or permission of the instructor. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 795 - Independent Study

Credits: 1-4

Open to highly qualified juniors and seniors. To be elected only with permission of the department chairperson and of the supervising faculty member or members. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 796 - The Internship Experience

Credits: 4

Students work with their peers to establish a personal definition of professionalism in their respective fields; they will read, critically analyze, and discuss articles covering a wide variety of topics, including writing at work, intended audiences, navigating a difficult work environment or situation, and strategies for professional development. Class sessions in a discussion format, intended to be flexible and to directly support the changing needs of writing in the workplace. Students, along with their supervisors, will create their own learning objectives and evaluation tools. Students will write about their experiences at the end of term. Prereqs: ENGL 419 and ENGL 502 or ENGL 602. Minimum GPA 3.0 required for registration. FR/SO status students excluded. Not open to ENGL/Journalism or ENGL Teaching majors.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 695

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 797 - Special Studies in Literature

Credits: 4

A) Old English Literature, B) Medieval Literature, C) 16th Century, D) 17th Century, E) 18th Century, f) English Romantic Period, G) Victorian Period, H) 20th Century, I) Drama, J) Novel, K) Poetry, L) Non-fiction, M) American Literature, N) A Literary Problem, O) Literature of the Renaissance, R) Race and Racial Theories. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 797R - Special Studies in Literature (Race & Racial Theories)

Credits: 4

A) Old English Literature, B) Medieval Literature, C) 16th Century, D) 17th Century, E) 18th Century, F) English Romantic Period, G) Victorian Period, H) 20th Century, I) Drama, J) Novel, K) Poetry, L) Non-fiction, M) American Literature, N) A Literary Problem, O) Literature of the Renaissance, R) Race and Racial Theories. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 797

Grade Mode: Letter Grade

ENGL 799 - Study Abroad in Cambridge England

Credits: 0

UNH Cambridge Summer Program at Gonville & Caius College of Cambridge University in Cambridge, England. This course number is a place-holder. Students register for both this administrative course number and two of the courses being offered through the program. These courses will vary from year to year. To view the courses offered visit http://www.unh.edu/cambridge. Permission required. Special fee. Cr/F.

Co-requisite: INCO 589

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery)

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail

ENGL #799A - Study Abroad in Cambridge England Bonus Weekend

Credits: 0

UNH Cambridge Summer Program Bonus Weekend excursion. This course is a place-holder. Location may change from year to year. To view Bonus Weekend description and location visit http://www.unh.edu/cambridge. Permission required. Special fee.

Co-requisite: ENGL 799

Grade Mode: