Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 411 - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the core concepts, methods, and research of contemporary cultural anthropology, as well as to the ways in which the discipline is relevant to their daily lives. Students will learn how anthropology approaches the study of culture, language and communication, family and kinship, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, economic relationships, political systems, religion, social change and globalization. Ethnographic material from both the U.S. and cross-culturally, as well as a series of hands-on, experiential and interactive activities, will demonstrate anthropological concepts and questions.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery)

Equivalent(s): ANTH 411H, ANTH 411W

ANTH 411W - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the core concepts, methods, and research of contemporary cultural anthropology, as well as to the ways in which the discipline is relevant to their daily lives. Students will learn how anthropology approaches the study of culture, language and communication, family and kinship, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, economic relationships, political systems, religion, social change and globalization. Ethnographic material from both the U.S. and cross-culturally, as well as a series of hands-on, experiential and interactive activities, will demonstrate anthropological concepts and questions.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): ANTH 411, ANTH 411H

ANTH 412 - Broken Pots and Buried Cities: Introduction to World Archaeology

Credits: 4

Traces the history of archaeology's most spectacular finds and how those moments of adventure and glory developed into a scientific discipline. Provides an introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to recover, analyze, and interpret data in their ongoing effort to understand humanity through the analysis of those small things left behind.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

ANTH 415 - The Human Story: Evolution, Fossils and DNA

Credits: 4

This course uses an evolutionary approach to investigate human biological and bio-cultural variation in time and space. Through a study of the basics of population genetics, an evaluation of our closest living relatives, nonhuman primates, and an exploration of the biological and cultural pathways traversed by our ancestors to become modern Homo sapiens, students learn the depth and complexity of the human story. Laboratory exercises dealing with human genetics, hominin fossils, and evolution are integrated with lectures to give students hands-on learning experience. No credit earned if credit received for ANTH 413.

Attributes: Biological Science(Discovery)

Equivalent(s): ANTH 413

ANTH 440A - Honors/Medicine and Culture: Science, Technology and the Body

Credits: 4

This course takes a comparative, cross-cultural approach to global medicine. Through critical readings, multimedia presentations, class discussions, and expository writing, we consider how techno-scientific developments, transnational flows, environmental transformations, and historical inequities shape how we know and experience our bodies. Key course topics include controversies surrounding new medical technologies, the intersections between Western and non-Western medical systems, and innovative responses to chronic global diseases.

Attributes: Environment,TechSociety(Disc); Honors course

ANTH 440B - Honors/Saving Culture: Heritage Management

Credits: 4

Culture and heritage are increasingly important topics for scholars, art connoisseurs, politicians, and the public alike. The Taj Mahal in India is the UNESCO world heritage site, but is yoga that many around the world engage in? Who decides what heritage is and what counts as culture? How do these decisions impact peoples' daily lives? The course introduces students to the concept of cultural heritage and how it “works” in complex, non-universal ways.

Attributes: Honors course; World Cultures(Discovery)

ANTH 444 - The Lost Campus: The Archaeology of UNH

Credits: 4

In this course, students are active participants in the systematic documentation and examination of the University of New Hampshire's cultural heritage resources. Students are introduced to the practice and process of archaeology through lectures, readings, assignments and hands-on archival research and archaeological fieldwork. Students learn the foundational methods of archaeology including survey, mapping, documentation, excavation, artifact identification, artifact interpretation, and presenting results to the public.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery)

ANTH 450 - Introduction to Race, Culture, and Power

Credits: 4

Race, culture, and power intersect at a social space where those in that space experience differing opportunities and access to social and economic privileges, resources, and power. This course explains the way race functions today as a social and cultural category to justify systematic inequality and differences in power and to obscure the functioning of the global economy. The course draws on emerging literature on Blackness, Whiteness, and Minorities and on analyses of the differential implementation of social welfare policies in the United States. (Also listed as INCO 450.)

Equivalent(s): INCO 450

ANTH 500 - Peoples and Cultures of the World

Credits: 4

Explores cultures and peoples from specific geographic regions of the world. Broadly considers social, gendered, economic, and political changes in ecological and historical context, focusing on precolonial, colonial, and contemporary societies and globalization. May be repeated barring duplication of subject.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery)

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 500W

ANTH 501 - World Archaeological Cultures

Credits: 4

The development of prehistoric cultures worldwide offered in the following sections: A) North America; B) Mesoamerica; C) South America; D) Near East; E) Europe; F) Asia. North America: from earliest settlement to European contact, includes Eastern Woodlands, The Plains, and the Southwest. Mesoamerica: from earliest cultures through Spanish conquest, includes the Olmec, Maya, and Aztec civilizations. South America: Cultural development from earliest migrations to the Inca Empire. Near East: from earliest agricultural villages to the world's first civilizations.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery)

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

ANTH 510 - Animals, Identity, and Culture

Credits: 4

This course explores the roles of identity and culture in shaping the relationships humans form with other animals. A range of relationships are investigated, including those that figure animals as beings sharing in personhood, as prey, as technologies, as workers, as food, and as family. Inspired by the explosion of new research in multiple disciplines, this course emphasizes cross-cultural and transhistorical variations, while also exploring some of the biosocial features humans share with other animals.

ANTH 511 - Core Concepts in Anthropology

Credits: 4

This foundational course, required within the first year of declaring the major, provides students with a cross-field perspective on anthropology through a focus on writing in the discipline. Approaching humankind as cultural and biological beings with distinct as well as interconnected histories, the course exposes students to the varied research practices of cultural, biological, archaeological, and linguistic anthropologists. Students will build skills in reading and research and will practice writing within several disciplinary genres and conventions that reflect anthropology's public as well as scholarly sides. Featured topics provide entry points into key anthropological themes, including the holistic study of human thought, behavior, language, ideologies, and institutions; race, gender, and inequality; and adaptation and change within social and natural environments.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANTH 513 - Ethnographic Methods

Credits: 4

The course introduces students to social science research and differences between quantitative and qualitative research methods, and provides a hands-on experience to develop skills in interviewing, participant-observation, life-history, surveying, socio-linguistics, fieldnotes, and ethics of the research.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery)

ANTH 514 - Method and Theory in Archaeology

Credits: 0 or 4

Basic method and theory; techniques in recovering and interpreting data; laboratory exercises in ceramic and lithic analysis. Critical evaluation of archaeological literature.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery)

ANTH 525 - Anthropology of the Body: Fat, Fitness and Form

Credits: 4

This course surveys the way our human bodies are valued, transformed, experienced and made subject to control in different societies around the world. It explores cultural constructions of fatness and obesity, fitness and sports as sites of politics, economics and social change, and bodily modification and dis-integration in tattooing, injury, biomedical technology, disability, aging, and extreme environments of war and outerspace. Uses anthropological and feminist theories and introduces ethnographic methods.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

ANTH 550 - Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of forensic anthropology, a sub-field of biological anthropology that applies knowledge of skeletal anatomy to problems of medico-legal significance (i.e., identification of human skeletal remains and interpretation of the circumstances surrounding death). This course outlines concepts underlying the recovery and analysis of human remains, the determination of the biological profile (including age, sex, ancestry, and stature), and the interpretation of skeletal trauma and pathology.

ANTH #597 - Special Topics

Credits: 4

Occasional and experimental offerings on an entry level. May be repeated for different topics.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

ANTH 610 - Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing

Credits: 4

Intermediate-level introduction to medical anthropology through sociocultural and bioarchaeological approaches to describing health-related ideas and practices in cross-cultural, historical and ecological contexts. Focuses on human illness and religious experiences of disease and the end of life. Considers how suffering, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and care are shaped by: religion and ritual; symbolism and language; age, gender and sexuality; families, social movements, and governments; and the worldwide expansion of biomedical expertise and technologies.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 610W

ANTH 611 - History of Anthropological Theory

Credits: 4

Provides a grounding in the history of social thought in cultural anthropology and sister disciplines from 19th century evolutionism to the present. Course reading is based on primary sources - original essays written by theorists central to the discipline. Assessment is partly based on students' ability to apply theoretical concepts to novel contexts, as well as the ability to evaluate and compare theories on the basis of logic and evidence.

ANTH 612 - Applied Anthropology

Credits: 4

Introduces students to the ways anthropological questions, concepts, and methods are applied to real world problems. Students learn how anthropological knowledge and methods can be used in a wide range of disciplines and careers. The course includes experiential learning where students engage with professionals doing work within applied anthropology. Students gain perspective on the practical possibilities in their major and acquire skills to position themselves for future careers.

ANTH 616 - Religion, Culture, and Society

Credits: 4

Major anthropological theories of religion; analysis of religious beliefs as symbolic systems and their interrelations with ritual and other social institutions. Detailed study of specific religions. Operates on a seminar format. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANTH #620 - Ritual and Religion of Ancient Mesoamerica

Credits: 4

This course examines the religious beliefs and ritual practices of ancient Mesoamerican cultures, such as the Olmec, Maya, and Aztecs. Students learn about the meaning of ritual practices (like human sacrifice and burial rites) and the myths that underlie this mysterious ritual behavior from an archaeological perspective. This class is writing intensive and involves primarily in-class discussion. Students are evaluated based on their participation, oral presentations, and a number of writing assignments. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANTH 625 - Sexuality in Cross-Cultural Perspectives

Credits: 4

This course examines the ideologies and practices associated with sexuality from a broad perspective that incorporates diverse case studies from the ethnographic record. Working from the argument that much of human sexual behavior is culturally constructed rather than biologically determined, the course invites students to expand their notion of the "normal" and to consider the human condition from a cross-cultural perspective. Topics discussed include cross-cultural varieties of transgendered experience, same-sex sexualities, and heteronormative identities.

ANTH 640 - Anthropology of Islam: Muslims' Everyday Lives in Contemporary Communities

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to different ways of being Muslim in contemporary world, focusing on Muslim communities residing in Central Asia (post-Soviet independent countries, China, and Afghanistan); the United States and some parts of Europe; and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

ANTH 645 - Cultural Sustainability and the Role of Public Archaeology

Credits: 4

In archaeology, the sustainability movement has encouraged increased outreach and education in an effort to make archaeology relevant to the public and to sustain past lifeways, especially cultural traditions threatened of being erased in our increasingly homogenized and globalized world. Students will be introduced to this field and experience for themselves how to translate academic archaeology to the masses through public programming, from designing museum exhibits to participating in "open archaeology" education for the public.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

ANTH 650 - Anthropology of Migration and Movement

Credits: 4

This course uses an anthropological framework to gain a more nuanced understanding of the complexities of global migration and human movement. It will examine the theoretical underpinnings of an anthropological perspective on migration and movement, and will explore a variety of ethnographic case studies to explore the significant political, economic, environmental, legal, and social issues that influence global migration.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANTH 655 - Bioarchaeology of the Human Past

Credits: 4

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains from ancient and historical sites. Past populations can be examined by utilizing principles of skeletal and dental biology, as well as archaeological context and ethnohistory, to address anthropological questions. This course will encompass a global survey of bioarchaeological sites and research, with a focus on women and children in the past. Students will explore ethical issues, controversies, excavation methods, and inclusion of indigenous communities.

ANTH 660 - Human Osteology

Credits: 4

This course will cover the study of the human skeleton (osteology) and the ethical handling and treatment of human remains. The lecture format will be followed for the first 2/3 of the course while students will participate in hands-on skeletal analysis for the last third of the class. Students will learn about the major bones of the body, common pathologies, trauma analysis and interpretation, and age, sex, stature, and ancestry estimation.

ANTH 674 - Archaeological Survey and Mapping in Belize

Credits: 4

Involves hands-on training in field reconnaissance, survey and mapping of archaeological sites, and the use of ARCGIS mapping software. This field course takes place in Belize (Central America) and will be of interest to students studying anthropology, geography and geospatial technologies, among others. Special fee.

Co-requisite: INCO 589

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

ANTH 685 - Gender, Sexuality and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa

Credits: 4

HIV/AIDS has been defined as one of the exceptional global pandemics of the Millennium. This course traces the rise and global spread of HIV and AIDS and the introduction of antiretroviral therapies and preventions in sub-Saharan African and its Diasporas with a focus on sex and gender. Includes findings on heterosexual and LGBTIQA individuals, couples, and communities and perspectives on: kinship, marriage, love, transactional sex, reproduction, contraception, gender-based violence, and activist movements. Uses ethnographies and health sciences databases.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANTH 695 - Globalization and Global Population Health

Credits: 4

This course traces how political economies drive global movements of people, diseases, and health interventions. It takes a multidisciplinary approach through medical anthropology and humanities, public health, and sustainability, looking at: histories of health intervention and biomedical technologies; under-development; shifting public-private sector governance; humanitarianism, cultural knowledge, expertise, and translation; and health-related social justice approaches and liberation theologies. Topics may include: epidemics, non-communicable diseases, metabolic disorders, substance abuse, violence, injury, and aging.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANTH 697 - Special Topics

Credits: 4

Occasional or experimental offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Prereq: ANTH 411 or permission. Operates on a seminar format.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 697W

ANTH 699 - Senior Thesis

Credits: 4 or 8

Independent work in the library or field; recommended for, but not confined to, majors intending to pursue graduate studies. Contact staff to obtain approval and arrange supervision prior to senior year. 4 or 8 credit 2 semesters; an IA grade (continuous course) given at end of first semester. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 699H

ANTH 699H - Honors Senior Thesis

Credits: 4 or 8

Independent work in the library or field; recommended for, but not confined to, majors intending to pursue graduate studies; required for honors candidates. Contact staff to obtain approval and arrange supervision prior to senior year. 4 or 8 credit 2 semesters, 8 credits required for honors; an IA grade (continuous course) given at end of first semester. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Honors course; Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 699

ANTH 700 - Internship

Credits: 1-4

Provides student with supervised practical experience in anthropology in one of the following areas: A) professional or community support work within an academic or applied anthropology setting; B) teaching; C) museum work; D) archaeological laboratory or fieldwork; E) research on a faculty research project; F) editorial work on a journal or faculty book project. Prereq: permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

ANTH 750 - Islam and Gender: Gendered Lives of Muslims

Credits: 4

This seminar focuses on the lives of Muslims. While critically questioning some existing ideas about and representations of Muslims, it introduces students to practical and historical aspects of gender politics in different Muslim communities.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANTH 785 - The Anthropology of Dreams and Dreaming

Credits: 4

This course emphasizes the "dream theories" of indigenous societies and how beliefs and practices associated with dreaming are integrated into cultural, ontological, political, economic, and religious systems. Western theories are also examined from within a comparative perspective--from basic Freudian models to contemporary scientific debates about the neurological origin and significance of dreaming. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

ANTH 795 - Reading and Research

Credits: 1-8

A) Cultural/Social Anthropology; B) Anthropological Linguistics; C) Archaeology; D) Physical Anthropology. Prereq: 12 credits of anthropology; permission.

ANTH 796 - Reading and Research

Credits: 1-8

A) Cultural/Social Anthropology; B) Anthropological Linguistics; C) Archaeology; D) Physical Anthropology. Prereq: 12 credits of anthropology; permission.

ANTH 797 - Advanced Topics

Credits: 4

Advanced or specialized courses presenting material not normally covered in regular course offerings. May be repeated, but not in duplicate areas. Course descriptions on file in the department office during registration. A) Social Organization; B) Economic Anthropology; C) Anthropology of Religion; D) Political Anthropology; E) Social Impact Analysis; F) Cultural Ecology; G) Prehistoric Archaeology; H) Historic Archaeology; I) Cultural Resources Conservation; J) Lithic Analysis; K) Ceramic Analysis; L) Faunal Analysis; M) Human Evolution; N) Human Variations; O) Anthropological Theory. Prereq: ANTH 411 or ANTH 412 (as appropriate)/ or permission. Operates on a seminar format, open only to juniors and seniors.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.