Human Development & Family Studies (HDFS)

HDFS 444 - History of the Family

Credits: 4

This course provides an interdisciplinary examination of the family from multiple disciplines and lenses including history, anthropology, economics, state and national legislation and regulations, art, media, and literature. The course will use film, essays, newspaper articles, and television to shed light on the shifting meaning of family in North America and across the world.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 444

HDFS 444A - Children at Risk

Credits: 4

This course focuses on childhood risks such as poverty, family stress and dysfunction, social and emotional problems, and bullying, as well as how children cope with risk and demonstrate resilience. Students will learn about and visit a number of community programs in New Hampshire that support children and their families in times of stress. Site-visits will include introduction to a range of providers such as child advocates, counselors, social workers, juvenile detention workers, and teachers.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 444A

HDFS 525 - Human Development

Credits: 0 or 4

This course provides an overview of human development from conception through death with an emphasis on the contexts in which development occurs, and a focus on thinking about ways to enhance the lives of individuals and families across the lifespan. The knowledge gained in this course will allow students to understand the needs of individuals across all life stages, and critically reflect on their own development.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): FS 525, FS 525H, HDFS 525H

HDFS 525H - Honors/Human Development

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of human development from conception through death with an emphasis on the contexts in which development occurs, and a focus on thinking about ways to enhance the lives of individuals and families across the lifespan. The knowledge gained in this course will allow students to understand the needs of individuals across all life stages, and critically reflect on their own development.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): FS 525, FS 525H, HDFS 525

HDFS 545 - Intimate Relationships and Families

Credits: 4

This course provides students with an overview of contemporary research and theory on intimate and family relationships. An historical overview of marriage, intimate partnering, and the family will be covered while also exploring diverse experiences. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural, societal, and political norms and tensions surrounding intimate and family relationships and related public policy. Students will also have an opportunity to reflect on their own attitudes, thoughts, and values.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): FS 545, FS 645, HDFS 645

HDFS 553 - Personal and Family Finance for Family Life Professionals

Credits: 4

This course focuses on applied financial management emphasizing teaching financial issues to a variety of audiences. Topics include savings, credit, insurance and retirement, and programs and resources available to facilitate financial education.

Equivalent(s): FS 553

HDFS 565 - Introduction to Child Life

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of the child life profession and family centered care. Child life professionals work with children and adolescents facing acute, chronic, or life-threatening illness and traumatic injuries, and their families. Topics include children's emotional reactions to hospitalization, use of play, preparation for medical procedures, family support, and designing healing environments.

Equivalent(s): FS 565, RMP 565

HDFS 586 - Families at Risk

Credits: 4

This course is designed to look at the challenging biological, cultural and situational factors that affect the contemporary family. Concerns such as immigration, terrorism, disease, and media influences will be discussed, along with global problems of climate change, war, violence, alcohol and drug abuse, and economic change. This class is about how families cope with the stress associated with these challenges, but also how they adapt, how to promote resilience, and how families can thrive in the face of adversity. Students will explore remedies, solutions and support networks that help families in crisis. Prereq: HDFS 545 or permission.

Equivalent(s): FS 586

HDFS 605 - Child Study and Development Center Field Experience

Credits: 2 or 6

This course involves supervised experience in the UNH Child Study and Development Center working with children infancy through kindergarten. Prereq: permission. Materials fee. May be repeated up to a total of 8 credits. Cr/F.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): FS 605

HDFS 623 - Developmental Perspectives on Infancy and Early Childhood

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the physical, cognitive, language, and social-emotional development of children from the prenatal period through early and middle childhood. Theories of development are discussed as well as research methodologies used in the study of child development. Special attention is given to landmark and current research findings regarding development during this period of the lifespan. Prereq: HDFS 525.

Equivalent(s): FS 623

HDFS 624 - Developmental Perspectives on Adolescence and Early Adulthood

Credits: 4

This course examines the normative changes adolescents experience in biological, social, emotional, and cognitive domains. Emphasis is on the contexts of adolescent development including family and peer relationships, school, work, leisure, and broader cultural influences. Students will learn about problematic and risky behaviors as well as the positive development outcomes associated with this period of the lifespan.

Equivalent(s): FS 624

HDFS 625 - Adult Development and Aging

Credits: 4

This course covers the general biological, psychological, and cultural theories and issues related to adult development and aging from emerging adulthood to the oldest old. The course emphasizes diversity in the process of aging and the influence of various contexts on that process. Designed for students who want to become more knowledgeable about successful aging as well as those who plan to work in adult and gerontological research or social services settings.

Equivalent(s): FS 625

HDFS 635 - Teaching and Learning in Early Childhood Settings

Credits: 4

This course covers the theoretical and developmentally-appropriate approaches to supporting young children's physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development in early childhood settings. Weekly four-hour practicum experience working with preschool children at the UNH Child Study and Development Center is required. Prereq: HDFS 525, HDFS 623, or permission.

Equivalent(s): FS 635

HDFS 641 - Parenting Across the Life Span

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of theory and current research on parenting in contemporary society. The course explores the challenges and changing nature of parenting across development, current parenting issues, and parenting in diverse family types. Students will also have an opportunity to reflect on their own attitudes, thoughts, and values in regards to parenting. Prereq: HDFS 525, HDFS 545, or permission.

Equivalent(s): FS 641

HDFS 695 - Independent Study

Credits: 1-6

Supervised in-depth scholarly experience relevant to any of the HDFS specializations: Child Development, Family Support, and Lifespan Development. Student must work directly with a supervising faculty member to develop and complete the project. Prereq: permission.

Equivalent(s): FS 695

HDFS 697 - Special Topics

Credits: 1-6

Focused examination of a particular theoretical, methodological, or policy issue. Prereq: permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): FS 697, FS 697W, HDFS 697W

HDFS 697W - Special Topics

Credits: 1-6

Focused examination of a particular theoretical, methodological, or policy issue. Prereq: permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): FS 697, FS 697W, HDFS 697

HDFS 707 - Practicum

Credits: 1-6

Supervised in-depth experience in professional setting designed to increase the student's understanding of and experience working with children, adolescents, or families. Students must work with a supervising faculty member to identify a practicum site. 01) Child, 02) Family, 03) Adolescent. Prereq: permission. Cr/F.

Equivalent(s): FS 707

HDFS 709 - Child Development Internship

Credits: 4

Supervised teaching internship at the UNH Child Study and Development Center with children 6 wks-6 years old age for 9 hours each week. Internship experiences include teaching, documentation, and assessment. In addition students attend a weekly one-hour seminar for an in-depth reflection and analysis of the internship experience. Prereq: HDFS 525; HDFS 623; HDFS 635; and permission. Materials fees. May be repeated up to a total of 8 credits. Special fee.

Equivalent(s): FS 709, FS 790A, FS 790B

HDFS 710 - Child Life Internship

Credits: 1-12

Supervised in-depth experience designed to increase the student's understanding of and experience working with children and adolescents in clinical or hospital setting. Prereq: permission. Special Fee. Cr/F.

Equivalent(s): FS 710

HDFS 712 - Child Advocacy and Family Policy Internship

Credits: 4-8

Supervised experience working in state, federal, international, or state-wide advocacy organization or agency that advocates for children and/or families. Students spend a required number of hours per week in their selected program, based on the number of credit hours. (Spring semester, possibly Summer). Prereq: HDFS major; senior status; HDFS 525; HDFS 545; 28 credit hours of human development and family studies coursework; permission. May be taken for 4 to 8 credits. Cr/F.

Co-requisite: HDFS 714

Equivalent(s): FS 712

HDFS 714 - Seminar for Child Advocacy and Family Policy Interns

Credits: 2

This biweekly seminar focuses on issues of concern to child advocacy and family policy internship students, and develops students' professional skills. Prereq: HDFS major, senior status; permission. (Spring semester, possibly Summer).

Co-requisite: HDFS 712

Equivalent(s): FS 714

HDFS 733 - Supervising Programs for Young Children

Credits: 4

This course is designed for students interested in exploring the role of program directors or administrators in early childhood education settings. Program resources, supervision, finances, and regulations will be covered using philosophical bases, theoretical rationales, and real world examples. Prereq: permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 733

HDFS 734 - Curriculum for Young Children

Credits: 4

This course focuses on the design, implementation, and evaluation of developmentally-appropriate activities in a classroom of young children. This course takes the stance that curriculum is not simply activities or plans, but a product of societal, school, and classroom culture as influenced by particular views of development. Special Fee. Prereq: HDFS 525; HDFS 623; HDFS 635. Only open to HDFS majors.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 734

HDFS 743 - Families, Schools, and Community

Credits: 4

This course takes an ecological approach to emphasize the critical value of effective family-school-community partnerships in enhancing the education of young children. Models of family-school-community partnerships are explored. Practical knowledge regarding the experiences of those from diverse backgrounds to best prepare students to interact with, and support, all children and families is highlighted. Students actively engage within the community to build bridges between families, schools, and the greater community.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): HS 743

HDFS 746 - Human Sexuality

Credits: 4

This course addresses the biological, psychological, and cultural aspects of human sexuality and gender across the lifespan. Opinions, attitudes, and values affecting societal responses to sexual issues are explored in relation to scientific research and theory. Students will be better prepared to deal with sexual issues in their personal and professional lives.

Equivalent(s): FS 746

HDFS 757 - Race, Class, Gender, and Families

Credits: 4

This course explores the intersection of race, class, and gender in family life in the US. Theory, research, and other relevant literature is used to examine the variety of family configurations in our society today and the diverse experiences that individuals and families have as a result of existing social, political, and economic institutions.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 757

HDFS 760 - Family Programs and Policies

Credits: 4

This course explores the relationship between family policy and legislation with programs, services, and family experiences at the local, state and national level. Course content includes concepts associated with planning for, implementing, and evaluating family policies and programs; as well as exploring the complexities of family policy and the policy-making process. Course assignments will challenge students to understand and evaluate family policies and programs that are compatible with their professional interests. Prereq: HDFS 545 or permission.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 760, HDFS 760W

HDFS 771 - Observation and Assessment of Young Children

Credits: 4

Comprehensive view of various observation techniques for determining children's strengths and emerging skills. Exploration of issues regarding the use of formal assessments and testing with young children, retention and transitional placements, and the parent's role in testing. Prereq: HDFS 525; HDFS 623; HDFS 635. (Fall semester only.)

Equivalent(s): FS 771

HDFS 772 - Child and Family Advocacy

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to the roles of types of child and family advocacy. The course will enable students to develop strategies for analyzing and impacting existing policies, practices, and perceptions in relation to issues impacting children, youth, and families. Students will learn techniques for influencing decision makers, government and legislative leaders, and the media.

Equivalent(s): FS 772

HDFS 773 - International Perspectives on Children and Families

Credits: 4

An investigation of historical and modern conceptions of children and families in selected African, Asian, European, and Latin countries. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of these populations to the changing ethnic portrait of America. Prereq: seniors only.

Equivalent(s): FS 773, FS 773W, HDFS #773W

HDFS #773W - International Perspectives on Children and Families

Credits: 4

An investigation of historical and modern conceptions of children and families in selected African, Asian, European, and Latin countries. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of these populations to the changing ethnic portrait of America. Prereq: seniors only. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 773, HDFS 773

HDFS 776 - Children, Adolescents and the Law

Credits: 4

This course is designed to familiarize students with the specialized laws and legal systems that govern children and adolescents. Discussion will focus on society's efforts to balance competing interests and goals. The course provides the chance to explore laws and processes that affect children and adolescents as they interact with the court system, their caregivers, families and society at large.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 776

HDFS 782 - Family Internship

Credits: 6

Supervised experience working in human services agencies. Students spend a minimum of 16 hours per week in a selected community program. Admission by application only. A senior-level course with 6 credits being taken both fall and spring of the senior year. Prereq: HDFS major; senior status; HDFS 525; HDFS 545; 20 credit hours of HDFS course work; permission. Pre- or Coreq: HDFS 760. IA (continuous grading). Cr/F.

Co-requisite: HDFS 792

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 2 times.

Equivalent(s): FS 782

HDFS 785 - Seminar for Student Teachers

Credits: 2

This seminar supplements the student teaching experience and provides a transition to the profession of teaching for those students admitted to the early childhood certification option. Students must apply during the spring semester of their junior year to be considered for the early childhood certification option. Prereq: HDFS major; senior status; HDFS 525; HDFS 545; HDFS 623; HDFS 635; permission. (Fall semester only).

Equivalent(s): FS 786

HDFS 786 - Seminar for Student Teachers

Credits: 2

This seminar supplements the student teaching experience and provides a transition to the profession of teaching for those students admitted to the early childhood certification option. Students must apply during the spring semester of their junior year to be considered for the early childhood certification option. Prereq: HDFS major; senior status: HDFS 525; HDFS 545; HDFS 623; HDFS 635; permission. Coreq: HDFS 788. (Spring semester only).

Co-requisite: HDFS 788

Equivalent(s): FS 786

HDFS 788 - Student Teaching Young Children

Credits: 8

Supervised teaching experience. Students spend a minimum of 20 hours per week in a selected program for young children working with a cooperating teacher. Students must apply during the spring semester of their junior year to be considered for the early childhood certification option. Prereq: HDFS major; senior status; HDFS 525: HDFS 545; HDFS 623; HDFS 635; HDFS 785; permission. Coreq: HDFS 786. (Spring semester only). Special fee. Cr/F.

Co-requisite: HDFS 786

Equivalent(s): FS 788

HDFS 792 - Family Internship Seminar

Credits: 2

This biweekly seminar focuses on issues of concern to family internship students, provides advanced training in educational strategies for working with families, and develops students' professional skills. This is a two-semester course with 2 credits being taken each semester. Prereq: HDFS major; admission to family internship program; permission. (Fall and spring semester.) IA (continuous grading).

Co-requisite: HDFS 782

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 2 times.

Equivalent(s): FS 792, FS 792W

HDFS 794 - Families and the Law

Credits: 4

This course explores statutory law, case law and the judicial processes that affect families as members interact with each other and with society. Students will become familiarized with the family court system and its role in regulating the family.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): FS 794

HDFS 795 - Advanced Independent Study

Credits: 1-6

Students in the major may undertake advanced study in child development, lifespan development or family support in consultation with a HDFS faculty member. The result of the study is to be a significant written product of a quality comparable to a 700 level course. A learner/sponsor contract will be required. Prereq: permission.

HDFS 797 - Advanced Special Topics

Credits: 1-6

Focused examination of a particular theoretical, methodological, or policy issue. Prereq: permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): FS 797

HDFS 799 - Families and the Law

Credits: 2-4

Under direction of a faculty sponsor, students plan and carry out an independent investigative effort in an area of family, child, and/or consumer studies, resulting in a written thesis and an oral presentation before students and faculty. Prereq: majors only; senior standing; permission. Two-semester sequence as continuing course.

Equivalent(s): FS 799