Education (EDUC)

EDUC 400 - Careers in Education: Exploring Professional Contexts

Credits: 1

Designed for students interested in learning about careers in education, this survey course explores professional opportunities in both formal and informal education settings within P-12 teaching and beyond (i.e., research, museum director, counseling, social work, educational software developer, etc.). Faculty from multiple disciplines and local professionals will present seminars and lead discussions about their role in addressing contemporary issues in education. Students will consider pathways that can be taken to pursue professional goals. Cr/F.

EDUC #401 - Current Issues in Education

Credits: 2

This survey course explores current issues in education through multiple professional lenses. Students will consider the relationship between their career pathways and key issues impacting educational settings including social media, poverty, curriculum, assessment and evaluation. Cr/F.

EDUC 402 - Introduction to Educational Studies: Social Change and Education in Local and Global Contexts

Credits: 4

This course introduces students in the Dual Major in Educational Studies to the social, cultural, and political factors that influence education outside of conventional school settings. We examine the relationship between education and social change in local and global contexts. Guiding questions include: How does schooling produce certain kinds of citizens? How do grassroots movements use education to resist colonial/colonizing agendas? What role does education play in promoting democracy, and social and economic equality? Prereq: Permission required for non-majors.

EDUC 444B - Public Issues, Democratic Schooling & Active Citizenship in a Global Context

Credits: 4

This is a first-year inquiry course intended primarily for students participating in the Common Purposes residential living program. The course offers multidisciplinary content focused on active citizenship in a pluralistic democracy. The primary organizing concept of the course is community; assignments focus on deliberative dialogue, public reasoning , collective action, and social justice. The course is taught as a seminar and includes on-campus and off-campus applied projects.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery); Inquiry (Discovery)

EDUC 500 - Exploring Teaching

Credits: 4

For students considering a teaching career. In-school experiences to develop introductory skills in teaching. On-site seminars for analysis and evaluation. Assessment and advising related to teaching as a career. Prerequisite for further work toward teacher licensure. Minimum of 7 hours a week, plus travel time, required. Prereq: permission. Special fee. Cr/F.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

EDUC 506 - Literacy Tutoring at the Elementary School Level

Credits: 2

Supports students volunteering as reading and writing tutors in local elementary schools. Explores student-tutor relationships, student engagement, mentoring, literacy best-practices, and lesson-planning. Includes a weekly tutoring commitment through Seacoast Reads.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

EDUC 520 - Education, Poverty, and Development

Credits: 4

An examination of the human and institutional relationships among education, poverty, and social development. This course will emphasize the ways in which access to universal, effective education is correlated with the incidence of childhood poverty and its reduction in the US and selected countries in the developing world. Interactive, discussion-based classes. Prior coursework in social or political sciences, economics, international affairs, health sciences, or related fields suggested. A minimum of 15 hours of fieldwork beyond classroom time is required. Students can fulfill this requirement through a variety of experiences on and off campus.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

EDUC 525 - Teaching Race

Credits: 4

This course examines the idea of race from the perspective of science, history, and lived experience to help the student properly evaluate inequalities of treatment (on the basis of race or any other marker) in various sectors of life in the United States. The course aims at helping the student a) perceive what is taught about race and what is communicated in our schools and colleges about the meaning of racial ascription, of color, and whiteness and b) to figure out how the power of educational institutions can best be used to promote equality and racial justice in society.

EDUC 550 - Language and Linguistic Diversity in Schools

Credits: 4

The course offers a broad examination of language and linguistic diversity and identities, drawing from education, sociolinguistics, anthropology, child development, and related fields. Content includes a critical examination of the evolution of the laws and policies affecting linguistic minorities in the U.S. and how they inform the educational rights of emerging and developing bilingual learners. A minimum of 20hrs of fieldwork beyond classroom time is required. Students have the opportunity to identify age group preference for field placement.

EDUC #556 - Mentoring Adolescents with Disabilities in the Transition to Work

Credits: 2

Open to undergraduate with an interest in mentoring and diversity expansion at UNH. The primary goal is to introduce undergraduates with and without disabilities to a mentoring experience. Students will develop an understanding of the importance of expanding the diversity on campus. Each mentor/mentee relationship will be individualized based on the needs of the students enrolled and mentoring relationships will be a personalized matched.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

EDUC 605 - Educational Perspectives in Critical Times

Credits: 4

In this course students inquire, reflect on and teach ethical dilemmas in the practice of education. Students will establish a foundation of knowledge on which to build philosophies of education in preparation for a career in which they face policies influenced by political agendas, fads, and economic interests. Through readings, discussions and field experiences, students will become more practiced and comfortable in having difficult discussions related to pressing issues of education and equity. Special Fee.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

EDUC 610H - Field Experience in Educational Studies

Credits: 1-4

Work with an agency, institution, or organization to gain technical and/or professional competence not otherwise available. Student plans experience with departmental adviser. Credit approval subject to recommendation of faculty members and performance of student. Prereq: permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

EDUC #625 - Anthropological Thinking on Education

Credits: 4

Education is about, by, and for human beings. It takes place in a sociocultural context. It involves learning and, in many societies of the world, schooling. Education should, therefore, be understood from the viewpoint of what is known about human beings, i.e., from the viewpoint of anthropology. This course introduces the student to five key ideas in anthropology that help us think about education. The ideas are: Evolution, Culture, Structure, Function, and Relativism. The course is organized that the introduction of each idea is followed by select readings that illustrate how the idea bears on education. It is hoped that the course will provide the student with conceptual framework for analyzing educational policies and practices.

EDUC 694 - Courses in Supervised Teaching

Credits: 8

Supervised Teaching of Music. Cr/F. Supervised Teaching of Adult and Occupational Education. Cr/F. Supervised Teaching of Mathematics. Cr/F.

EDUC 694A - Supervised Teaching/Music

Credits: 8

Supervised Teaching of Music. Special fee. Cr/F.

EDUC 694C - Supervised Teaching/Mathematics

Credits: 8

Supervised Teaching of Mathematics. Cr/F.

EDUC 694D - Supervised Teaching/Kinesiology

Credits: 4

Supervised Teaching of Kinesiology. Cr/F.

EDUC 700 - Educational Structure and Change

Credits: 4

To assume leadership roles, beginning teachers need to develop an informed understanding of how they can operate effectively as decision-makers and agents of change within educational institutions. Such understanding entails knowledge of the politics, history, organization, and function of schools from a variety of viewpoints: historical, sociological, political, and cross-cultural. This course focuses on the structure of public education, on the nature of educational change, and the teacher's role in the change process.

EDUC 701 - Human Development & Learning: Cultural Perspectives

Credits: 4

Learning in formal and informal contexts and cultural aspects of learning and development with an emphasis on childhood and adolescence. Theories of learning including behaviorism, constructivism, sociocultural, and design perspectives. Topics include research and varied cultural perspectives on intelligence, motivation, identity and the self, concept learning and knowledge, noncognitive aspects of learning, social and emotional learning, deficit thinking and social justice perspectives, design-based perspectives on educational innovation, and assessment. Junior and Senior status. Special fee.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

EDUC 703C - Classroom Management: Creating Positive Learning Environments

Credits: 4

This course is designed to help prospective and current teachers create and maintain caring, respectful classroom communities in which learners feel safe, valued, cared for, valued, and empowered. The course includes a strong emphasis on developing knowledge about the culture and backgrounds of children and families in order to establish positive interactions within the classroom community. The course addresses the challenges and opportunities in creating community in the increasingly diverse student populations in US schools. We will consider what it means to be culturally responsive in order to establish a classroom in which all students can succeed academically and socially.

EDUC 703D - Social Studies Methods for Middle and High School Teachers

Credits: 4

The social studies theory and methods course begins with an overview of the varied and, at times, competing goals and visions of the profession. Students examine these goals and their underlying rationales, and then develop their own philosophy of social studies teaching and learning. Students also examine state and national scope and sequence frameworks for the social studies, as well as the language arts Common Core standards. A variety of classroom strategies and methods are explored during the remainder of the course, including unit design, leading class discussions, how to approach controversial issues, teaching concepts and generalizations, increasing student engagement and empathy with the past, incorporating technology and the arts, management and discipline, and formats for assessment and grading.

EDUC 703F - Teaching Elementary School Science

Credits: 4

This course is designed to increase pre-service teachers' pedagogical content knowledge and enthusiasm with respect to teaching science at the elementary level. Throughout this course, students will familiarize themselves with reform-based approaches to elementary science instruction through inquiry, readings, and class discussions. Science will be explored not only as an important element of elementary education, but also as a means by which to support a diverse class of elementary students in literacy and mathematics learning.

EDUC 703M - Teaching Elementary Social Studies

Credits: 4

Social Studies Methods explores practical teaching models, techniques of implementation, and relationships to curricula in elementary classroom instruction. The New Hampshire Social Studies Frameworks and Common Core Curriculum Standards for instruction are identified and implemented in creating lesson plans for a mini unit.

EDUC 705 - Contemporary Educational Perspectives

Credits: 4

Students formulate, develop, and evaluate their own educational principles, standards, and priorities. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

EDUC 706 - Introduction to Reading in the Elementary School

Credits: 4

Methods in reading and writing instruction; current procedures and materials; diagnostic techniques. Course satisfies reading/language arts requirement for prospective elementary teachers in the five-year teacher education program. Special fee.

EDUC 707 - Teaching Reading through the Content Areas

Credits: 2

Approaches and methods for teaching reading through content materials; coursework includes practical applications through development of instructional strategies and materials. Required for candidates seeking certification in art, biology, chemistry, earth science, general science, physical science, physics, or social science.

EDUC 710E - Workshop in Adult and Occupational Education

Credits: 1-4

Modularized instruction of in-service education. Focus varies with the needs of the student. May be repeated for up to 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): AOE 700

EDUC 710F - Investigations

Credits: 1-4

Topics may include informal learning, public pedagogies, secondary education, post-secondary education, adult education, extension education, cooperative education, or teaching experiences. Student-selected in one of the areas listed. Electives after consultation with instructor.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

EDUC 712 - Teaching Multilingual Learners

Credits: 4

This course is for people interested in teaching in schools and/or community agencies serving multilingual populations. Topics include: theories of first and second language acquisition, translanguaging, language policies and laws, strategies for teaching academic content to emerging bilinguals in mainstream classroom, creating classroom/school cultures that invite all students into learning, and the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in linguistically diverse public schools. In addition to designing and exploring a variety of teaching activities and techniques, students conduct a rich collection of field assignments including interviewing bi-/multilingual adults; visiting community agencies; and collaboratively designing community engagement activities.

EDUC #717 - Growing up Male in America

Credits: 4

An integrative view of growing up male in the American culture from birth through adulthood. Analysis of major perspectives on male development and the implications in parenting with specific emphasis on male education. Participants are expected to develop awareness of their own development as a male or alongside males, using current male development perspectives as a guide. They also create an awareness of how this will affect their behavior toward boys in their classrooms.

EDUC 718 - Critical Social Justice in and Beyond Education

Credits: 4

Students will become familiar with key concepts and principles of critical theory, critical pedagogy, and social justice education so that they may use this body of work to inform their teaching, leadership, and scholarship. We will examine the role of a) schools in providing equity of educational access and outcomes, b) teacher agency to change unjust conditions, and c) micro experiences within schools and the macro layer of context (i.e., history, politics, economics, culture).

EDUC 720 - Educational Technology

Credits: 4

Educators with any experience level will develop the skills and mindset to find and use technology tools that can enhance student learning. Assignments and online discussions focus on foundational educational technology topics, including ethical and social justice considerations, best practices, and national technology standards. Assignments are completed using each week's tech tool category, such as presentations, image/video editing, and website creation. Participants will curate educational technology tools that fit their preferences and needs. This class will include the focus on facilitating remote learning.

EDUC 733 - Teaching Writing in the 21st Century

Credits: 4

An examination of the challenges to teaching writing in the present age of high stakes testing and audit culture. The course addresses theories and methods for teaching writing in a complex society that values a range of expressive forms, including digital technologies, social media, film and video. Special emphasis on multi-model literacies in K-12 classrooms. Exploration of language diversity, the relationship among reading, writing, and literacy development in content-specific areas, and student-centered assessments.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

EDUC 734 - Children's Literature

Credits: 4

Interpretive and critical study of literature in elementary and middle school settings. Applications of children's literature in educational settings.

EDUC 741 - Exploring Mathematics with Young Children

Credits: 4

A laboratory course offering those who teach young children mathematics, and who are interested in children's discovery learning and creative thinking, offers a chance to experience exploratory activities with concrete materials, as well as mathematical investigations, on an adult level, that develop the ability to provide children a mathematically rich environment, to ask problem-posing questions, and to establish a rationale for doing so. Prereq: MATH 601.

EDUC 745 - Math with Technology in Early Education

Credits: 2

The primary goal of this course is that students gain knowledge of learning standards and teaching methods for the instruction of mathematics in early education settings with infants through 3rd grade. In addition, participants gain experience in applying their newfound knowledge in the areas of mathematics with technology through a combination of teaching and digital experiences. On-line course; no campus visits required. Please note the minimal technical requirements for a UNH e-course.

EDUC 750 - Introduction to Exceptionality

Credits: 4

A life span perspective of the social, psychological, and physical characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities including intellectual, sensory, motor, health, and communication impairments. Includes implications for educational and human service delivery.

EDUC 751A - Educating Exceptional Learners: Elementary

Credits: 4

Foundations of special education and an introduction to a variety of service delivery models with an emphasis on educating all learners in heterogeneous classrooms. Instructional strategies and supports for all students, particularly those with mild and moderate disabilities, will be the primary focus. Special fee.

EDUC 751B - Educating Exceptional Learners: Secondary

Credits: 4

Foundations of special education and an introduction to a variety of service delivery models with an emphasis on educating all learners in heterogeneous classrooms. Instructional strategies and supports for all students, particularly those with mild and moderate disabilities, will be the primary focus. Preparation for students' transitions to post-secondary life will be included. Special fee.

EDUC #751C - Educating Exceptional Learners: Related Services

Credits: 4

An overview of special education and related services in an educational setting. Focus on support services provided to general education and special education teachers, including laws relating to special populations, how related services interact with classroom and special educators, IEPs, and other topics that impact services provided to students with special needs.

EDUC #752 - Contemporary Issues in Learning Disabilities

Credits: 4

Critical analysis of current and historical conceptions of learning disability in the areas of definition, supporting theories, assessment practice, and teaching methodologies. Focus on contemporary issues in the field that relate to working with students labeled as learning disabled at both elementary and secondary levels.

EDUC 756 - Supporting Families of Individuals with Exceptionalities

Credits: 4

An introduction to family system theory and the implications for families having members with exceptionalities. Issues addressed include diagnosis and prognosis, coping strategies, communication and team collaboration, cross-cultural competence, and agency and school delivery of services. Emphasis is on proactive collaboration with family members.

Equivalent(s): EDUC 949

EDUC #757 - Contemporary Issues in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Credits: 4

The goal of this course is to enhance students' understanding of contemporary issues related to educating students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The course is grounded in a theoretical foundation that values the perspectives of individuals with ASD in academic, research, policy, and clinical endeavors. Learning outcomes focus on strategies for identifying opportunities for learning, communication, literacy, and social relationships in a variety of inclusive environments.

EDUC 760 - Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs

Credits: 4

Needs of children (birth to eight years) with developmental delays or who are at risk for disabilities. Strengths and special needs of such children; causes, identification, and treatment; current legislation; parent and family concerns; program models.

EDUC 761 - Inclusive Curriculum for Young Children with Special Needs

Credits: 4

Classroom applications of constructivist theory. Curriculum planning and implementation; overview of research and theory related to teaching and learning of specific content areas, with emphasis on integrated approach to early childhood curriculum. Stresses the reciprocal nature of student-teacher relationship.

EDUC 762 - Curriculum for Young Children with Special Needs: Evaluation and Program Design

Credits: 4

Overview of evaluation and intervention issues relevant to early childhood special education, focusing on ages three through eight. Norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment tools. Judgment-based evaluation and observation skills. Translation of evaluation information into goals and objectives for individual education programs. Developing appropriate programs in inclusive settings.

Equivalent(s): EDUC 947

EDUC 767 - Students, Teachers, and the Law

Credits: 4

Our public schools play a vital role in our society. What shall be taught and who shall teach our children are perennial questions. This course explores how the law impacts the educational lives of students and teachers, including issues of church-state relations, free speech, dress codes, and search and seizure. (Also offered as JUST 767.)

Equivalent(s): JUST 767

EDUC 784 - Educators as Community-Engaged Researchers

Credits: 4

With the guidance and support of the instructor, students work in collaborative teams to conduct a systematic inquiry into a current educational studies issue and present their findings and interpretations at a professional or community forum open to the public. Students are encouraged to conduct their research in non-formal education settings including but not limited to community agencies, museums, and after-school programs. Note: EDUC 784 is the principal option for the DMES capstone. Permission required.

EDUC #791 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Science

Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide experiences and resources that will support individuals who are planning to teach middle or high school science. Through interactive activities, readings, and class discussions, the class explores key elements and challenges of secondary science teaching and provide a foundation for continued growth and reflection throughout the students' teaching careers. Some of the main topics discussed in this course are national and state science standards, reform-based approaches to instruction, the use of technology in science teaching, laboratory safety, curriculum evaluation, and assessment.

EDUC 795 - Independent Study

Credits: 2 or 4

Juniors and seniors only, with approval by appropriate faculty member. Neither course may be repeated.

EDUC 797 - Special Topics in Education

Credits: 1-4

An experimental course for the purpose of introducing a new course or teaching a special topics for a semester in an area of specialization in Education.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 2 times.