Classics (CLAS)

CLAS 400 - Exploring and Experiencing the Ancient World and its Legacy

Credits: 2

Covers aspects of the ancient world and its subsequent importance not found in the rest of the Classics curriculum or dealt with only briefly. Topics are chosen to be timely by connecting antiquity to current events, including pop culture, or to be enduring but under-appreciated. Emphasis on active and engaged learning and, where possible, experiential activities. May be repeated on different topics. Does not satisfy major requirements.

CLAS 401 - Classical Mythology

Credits: 4

Survey of myths and sagas of ancient Greece and Rome. No classical preparation necessary. Background course for majors in English, the arts, music, history, modern languages, classics. Special fee.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

CLAS 401H - Honors/Classical Mythology

Credits: 4

Survey of myths and sagas of ancient Greece and Rome. No classical preparation necessary. Background course for majors in English, the arts, music, history, modern languages, classics. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

CLAS #402 - Hellenic and Roman Institutions

Credits: 4

Lecture, discussion. Introduction to ancient Greek and Roman literature. Emphasis on the institutions from the earliest period to the end of the classical age. Open to all students.

CLAS 405 - Introduction to Greek Civilization

Credits: 4

A broad historical exploration of Greek civilization. Topics include: architecture, art, law, literature, philosophy, poetry, politics, religion, society, warfare, and the Greek's legacy to the modern world. Open to all students. No prior knowledge of the ancient world assumed; all readings are in English. Ideal background for students of English, philosophy, history, Latin, Greek, the arts, music, modern languages. Special fee.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

CLAS 406 - Introduction to Roman Civilization

Credits: 4

A broad historical exploration of Roman civilization. Topics include: architecture, art, law, literature, philosophy, poetry, politics, religion, society, warfare, and their legacy to the modern world. Open to all students. No prior knowledge of the ancient world assumed; all readings are in English. Ideal background for students of English, philosophy, history, Latin, Greek, the arts, music, modern languages. Special fee.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

CLAS 411 - Elementary Hittite I

Credits: 4

Elements of grammar, reading of simple prose. Special fee.

CLAS 412 - Elementary Hittite II

Credits: 4

Elements of grammar, reading of simple prose. Special fee.

CLAS #414 - Elementary Sanskrit II

Credits: 4

Elements of grammar, reading of simple prose. Special fee.

CLAS 421 - Major Greek Authors in English

Credits: 4

Major classical authors such as Homer, the Tragedians of Athens, Herodotus, Thucydides, and Plato in the context of their civilization, from which so much of our contemporary culture derives. For students unprepared to read Greek. Background for majors in English, history, Latin, Greek, the arts, music, philosophy, modern languages. Open to all students. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

CLAS 444 - Individual and Society in the Ancient World

Credits: 4

This class examines one of the major issues faced by people throughout history, whether and under what circumstances an individual should act against the wishes of society. The great philosophical and historical works of the ancient world shed light not only on how the Greeks and Romans approached the idea of personal responsibility but also on the assumptions we today make about human nature and the relationships on which society depends. No prior knowledge of the ancient world required. All readings are in English. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

CLAS #444C - Is Winning Everything? Competition in Ancient Sports

Credits: 4

An investigation of the competitive nature of Greek athletics and the Roman games. Focus is on how Greek and Roman views of the value of competition reflect the differences in their histories. Particular attention paid to the types of evidence and methods used by ancient historians. Open to all students. All readings in English.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

CLAS 444D - Athens, Rome, and the Birth of the United States

Credits: 4

What did Washington, Jefferson, Adams (John and Abigail), Madison and Paine have in common? They were all instrumental in shaping the US political system, but they were also educated in the classics. When building the framework of our democratic republic, they continually looked to Athens and Rome as models, inspirations and warnings. The course examines ancient political systems and how they helped fashion our founder's notion of the ideal government and continue to do so.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

CLAS 500 - Classical Mythology: Topics in World Literature

Credits: 4

Topics are chosen to introduce students to major themes and genres. (Also offered as FREN 500, GERM 500, ITAL 500, PORT 500, RUSS 500, SPAN 500.) May be repeated for credit. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CLAS #506 - Introduction to Comparative and Historical Linguistics

Credits: 4

Major language families (primarily Indo-European) and the relationships among the languages within a family. Diachronic studies, methods of writing, linguistic change, glottochronology, etymological studies. Some language training and LING 505 desirable. (Also offered as LING 506.)

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

CLAS 510 - Building Rome

Credits: 4

An introduction to the buildings and structures for which the Romans remain famous, such as the Pantheon, the Colosseum, and the aqueducts that allowed Rome to become a metropolis. A major focus is the connection between the changes in Roman society and the development of Roman architecture. Looks at both Rome and other important cities in the Roman Empire. All readings are in English. No prior knowledge of the ancient world required. Special fee.

Co-requisite: INCO 589

Attributes: FinePerformingArts(Discovery)

CLAS 511 - Special Studies in Greek History

Credits: 4

The course uses historical and literary sources in conjunction with the city of Athens itself and its archaeological remains to explore the history of a particular theme, cultural practice or institution in ancient Greek civilization. The topics changes with different instructors but always takes a fundamentally historical orientation to the material and the city, even if interdisciplinary approaches are incorporated into the coursework. CLAS 511 is offered only as part of a study abroad program.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery)

CLAS 520A - Classical Society, Politics and Ethics: Democracies and Republics

Credits: 4

We frequently use the terms "democracy" and "republic" to describe our own political system, but where did these words and ideas originally come from? This course examines the historical development of the original democracies in Greece (primarily Athens) and the Roman Republic, as well as the particular institutions and practices that were associated with each. Course will also cover the development of democratic and republican institutions in the modern world. No prerequisite. Open to all students.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

CLAS 520B - Classical Society, Politics and Ethics: Happiness and Ancient Views of the Good LIfe

Credits: 4

How did the Greeks and Romans define happiness and was happiness considered an essential component of the "good life"? How do ancient concepts of the "good life" influence later views of human flourishing and how do specific historical circumstances alter utopian visions of a life well lived? This course traces the concept of the "good life" from ancient Greece to today and challenges students to create their own vision of a "good life".

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

CLAS 520C - Classical Society, Politics and Ethics: Sports, Spectacle and Competition

Credits: 4

This course treats the details of athletic training and competition, but it's primary focus is on investigating the importance of athletics to society and how athletics reflected the broader cultural values of the Greeks and Romans. Open to all students. All readings in English. Special fee.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

CLAS 520D - Classical Society, Politics and Ethics: Greek and Roman Religion

Credits: 4

This course traces the historical development of ancient Greek and Roman religion from its antecedents in Near Eastern, Minoan, and Mycenaean culture to the rise of Christianity in Rome's early imperial period. This course also introduces students to the methods and materials of historians of religion. Topics covered in this course include: changing conceptions of divinity, animal sacrifice, santuaries, festivals, death and the afterlife, divination, magic, and mystery cults.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

CLAS 525 - Greek and Latin Origins of Medical Terms

Credits: 4

Study of medical terminology. Exercises in etymology and the development of vocabulary in a context at once scientific, historical, and cultural. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Useful to premedical, pre-dental, pre-veterinary, nursing, medical technology, and other students in the biological and physical sciences. Open to all students. Special fee.

CLAS 530A - Classical Literary Performance Genres: War and Adventure in Ancient Epic

Credits: 4

Storytelling has long been one of the primary means to perserve and transmit cultural ideas and tradtions. In this course students read and analyze the earliest epic tales from the Greek and Roman period with a view toward understanding the roots and nature of epic, the myths it told, and the influence it has had on subsequent literature. No credit earned if credit received for CLAS 444B. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

CLAS 530B - Classical Literary and Performance Genres: Tragedy and Comedy on the Ancient Stage

Credits: 4

Investigations into the dramatic works of the Greek and Romans, the power of performance, and the cultural importance of stage productions. Readings include the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the comedies of Aristophanes, Menander, and Plautus. Ideal background for students of all theatrical and performance traditions. Open to all students. All readings in English. Special fee.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

CLAS 540A - Environment, Technology and Ancient Society: Sustaining Ancient Rome Ecology and Empire

Credits: 4

This course examines the interplay between the ancient Roman environment, Roman technological innovations, and the values of Roman imperial society. Examining Roman innovations in water supply, building technology, mining, and more, this course explores the ethical questions that arise through the use of ancient Roman technology, evaluates the effects of these technologies on the enivornment and Roman society, and determines whether Roman values encouraged or discouraged a responsible approach to technology and the environment.

Attributes: Environment,TechSociety(Disc)

CLAS 540B - Environment, Technology and Ancient Society: Roman Houses, Domestic Space and Public Life

Credits: 4

The Romans used the house as a communication technology for defining and expressing their identities in society and in the natural world. In this course, we examine literary and visual sources for Roman houses, apartments, villas, and palaces, and we compare and contrast the role of the house in the ancient world and in American society. We pay special attention to how domestic space shapes and is shaped by environment, politics, and culture.

Attributes: Environment,TechSociety(Disc)

CLAS 540C - Environment, Technology and Ancient Society: Tech, Tools and Engineering in the Ancient World

Credits: 4

This course examines positive and negative impacts of ancient technological advances: engineering (fire, metallurgy), writing technology (scripts, including the alphabet, the emergence of papyrus and vellum), military technology (shipbuilding, defensive and offensive technologies, and navigation), artistic (invention of dyes, lost-wax methods of bronze casting), infrastructure (roads, bridges, and aqueducts), and monumentality (Stonehenge, Greek temples, and the Roman Colosseum). Focus on the ways in which societal and environmental factors influenced technological development and vice versa.

Attributes: Environment,TechSociety(Disc)

CLAS 550A - Identities and Difference in the Ancient World: Greek and Roman Women

Credits: 4

The impact of women on society in Greece and Rome throughout Antiquity. The role of women in public, religious, and private life as well as their legal status through law codes. Men's views of women in different literary texts. Especially concentrating on the few existing texts written by women. All readings are in English. No prerequisite. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

CLAS 550B - Identities and Difference in the Ancient World: Slaves and Masters

Credits: 4

Students explore the different ways slavery developed in the Greek and Roman worlds with an emphasis on the connections to other historical developments such as the practice of warfare, changes in political systems, and ancient views about human rights. To better understand the development of Greek and Roman slavery, we look at how the ancient systems compare to slavery in the American South and modern human trafficking.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

CLAS 550C - Identities and Difference in the Ancient World: Sex and Desire in Greece and Rome

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to ancient Greek and Roman conceptions of desire and sexaulity, to how these conceptions developed and changed over time, and how they differ from modern ways of understanding sex, desire, and sexuality. Topics discussed include "romantic" love, attitudes towards homosexual practices, man-boy love, lesbianism, ancient views of "cross-dressing," and attitudes towards prostitution, among others. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

CLAS 551 - Greeks and Barbarians: Culture, Identity and Difference in the Ancient World

Credits: 4

Exploration of how the ancient Greeks' conceptions of foreign ethnicities and cultures -- most notably a contrast between European Greeks and various peoples from Asia, especially the Persians--evolved and was expressed in ancient literary and historical sources. Course examines how the Greeks came to think of themselves as a distinct people witih shared attributes amidst non-Greeks, to all of whom they applied the generic term "barbaroi," or barbarians.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery)

CLAS 560 - Sports, Spectacle, and Competition in the Ancient World

Credits: 4

This course treats the details of athletic training and competition, but it's primary focus is on investigating the importance of athletics to society and how athletics reflected the broader cultural values of the Greeks and Romans. Open to all students. All readings in English. Students who have previously taken CLAS #402 cannot receive credit for CLAS 410A, although they may receive credit for CLAS 410B and CLAS 410C. Special fee.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

CLAS 595 - Topics

Credits: 4

Introduction and elementary study related to linguistic study of Latin and Greek or relevant to Greco-Roman culture and history. Primarily for students unprepared to read Latin and Greek. Topics: A) Byzantine Heritage; B) Grammar: Comparative Study of English and the Classical Languages; C) Greek and Latin Origins of Legal Terms; D) Greek and Latin Origins within the English Language; E) Classical Backgrounds of Modern Literature; F) Classical Archaeology.

CLAS 596 - Topics

Credits: 4

Introduction and elementary study related to linguistic study of Latin and Greek or relevant to Greco-Roman culture and history. Primarily for students unprepared to read Latin and Greek. Topics: A) Byzantine Heritage; B) Grammar: Comparative Study of English and the Classical Languages; C) Greek and Latin Origins of Legal Terms; D) Greek and Latin Origins within the English Language; E) Classical Backgrounds of Modern Literature; F) Classical Archaeology.

CLAS 601 - Classical Myth II: The Power and Persistence of Myth

Credits: 4

An in-depth look at the myths of the Greeks and Romans, at the power of myth as a cultural force, and at the importance of myth both in the ancient period as well as the modern era. The focal point is on the myths of the Greeks and Romans, but the myths of other cultures are addressed. All readings are in English. Special fee. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CLAS 604 - Golden Age of Rome

Credits: 4

A study of the early Roman Empire as created by Augustus and his immediate successors; glorified by Vergil, Horace, and the poets of the Golden Age; and described by Tacitus, Suetonius, and the prose writers of the Silver Age. Open to all students. Prereq: any CLAS course or permission of instructor. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

CLAS 686 - UNH in Greece Study Abroad

Credits: 6

Study abroad in Greece. Interested students should consult a Classics advisor. Prereq: must satisfy university requirements for studying abroad. Special fee. Cr/F. (IA grade will be assigned until official transcript is received from the foreign institution.) Contact james.parsons@unh.edu at the COLA Center for Study Abroad or visit www.cola.unh.edu/greece for more information.

Co-requisite: CLAS 511, INCO 589

CLAS 694 - Supervised Practicum

Credits: 2 or 4

Participants earn credit for suitable pre-professional activities, including high school outreach, assisting in undergraduate courses and work with professional organizations, museum work. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors who are Classics, Latin, or Greek majors or minors and have above-average G.P.A.s. Writing assignments are required. Prereq: permission of instructor and program coordinator. Course does not count toward Classics, Latin, or Greek major or minor requirements. May be repeated up to a maximum of 8 credits. Special fee. Cr/F.

CLAS 695 - Special Studies

Credits: 2 or 4

Advanced work in classics. Research paper. Not open to freshmen and sophomores.

CLAS 696 - Special Studies

Credits: 2 or 4

Advanced work in classics. Research paper. Not open to freshmen and sophomores. Special fee.