Education (EDUC)

EDUC 800 - Educational Structure and Change

Credits: 4

To assume leadership roles, beginning teachers need to develop an informed understanding of how they can operate effectively as decision-makers and agents of change within educational institutions. Such understanding entails knowledge of the politics, history, organization, and function of schools from a variety of viewpoints: historical, political, and cross-cultural. This course focuses on the structure of public education, on the nature of educational change, and the teacher's role in the change process.

EDUC 801 - Human Development & Learning: Cultural Perspectives

Credits: 4

Learning in formal and informal contexts and cultural aspects of learning and development with an emphasis on childhood and adolescence. Theories of learning including behaviorism, constructivism, sociocultural, and design perspectives. Topics include research and varied cultural perspectives on intelligence, motivation, identity and the self, concept learning and knowledge, noncognitive aspects of learning, social and emotional learning, deficit thinking and social justice perspectives, design-based perspectives on educational innovation, and assessment. Special fee.

EDUC 803C - Classroom Management: Creating Positive Learning Environments

Credits: 4

This course is designed to help prospective and current teachers create and maintain caring, respectful classroom communities in which learners feel safe, valued, cared for, valued, and empowered. The course includes a strong emphasis on developing knowledge about the culture and backgrounds of children and families in order to establish positive interactions within the classroom community. The course addresses the challenges and opportunities in creating community in the increasingly diverse student populations in US schools. We will consider what it means to be culturally responsive in order to establish a classroom in which all students can succeed academically and socially.

EDUC 803D - Social Studies Methods for Middle and High School Teachers

Credits: 4

The social studies theory and methods course begins with an overview of the varied and, at times, competing goals and visions of the profession. Students examine these goals and their underlying rationales, and then develop their own philosophy of social studies teaching and learning. Students also examine state and national scope and sequence frameworks for the social studies, as well as the language arts Common Core standards. A variety of classroom strategies and methods are explored during the remainder of the course, including unit design, leading class discussions, how to approach controversial issues, teaching concepts and generalizations, increasing student engagement and empathy with the past, incorporating technology and the arts, management and discipline, and formats for assessment and grading.

EDUC 803F - Teaching Elementary School Science

Credits: 4

This course is designed to increase pre-service teachers' pedagogical content knowledge and enthusiasm with respect to teaching science at the elementary level. Throughout this course, students will familiarize themselves with reform-based approaches to elementary science instruction through inquiry, readings, and class discussions. Science will be explored not only as an important element of elementary education, but also as a means by which to support a diverse class of elementary students in literacy and mathematics learning.

EDUC 803M - Teaching Elementary Social Studies

Credits: 4

Social Studies Methods explores practical teaching models, techniques of implementation, and relationships to curricula in elementary classroom instruction. The New Hampshire Social Studies Frameworks and Common Core Curriculum Standards for instruction are identified and implemented in creating lesson plans for a mini unit. Special Fee.

EDUC 805 - Contemporary Educational Perspectives

Credits: 4

Students formulate, develop, and evaluate their own educational principles, standards, and priorities.

EDUC 806 - Introduction to Reading in the Elementary School

Credits: 4

Methods in reading and writing instruction; current procedures and materials; diagnostic techniques. Course satisfies reading/language arts requirement for prospective elementary teachers in the five year teacher education program. Special fee.

EDUC 807 - Teaching Reading through the Content Areas

Credits: 2

Approaches and methods for teaching reading through content materials; coursework includes practical applications through development of instructional strategies and materials. Required for candidates seeking licensure in art, biology, chemistry, earth science, general science, home economics, physical education, physics, or social studies.

EDUC 808 - Literacy Assessment for Elementary Classroom Teachers

Credits: 4

This is the first of a 2 course sequence for students earning an M.Ed. in Elementary Education, and is taken during the internship year. The course aims to prepare teachers to better understand individual readers in elementary classrooms in order to provide effective supports. The course integrates research and practical applications for elementary literacy assessments. Interns have the opportunity to apply their learning with students in their internship classrooms. Prereq: EDUC 806.

Co-requisite: EDUC 900

EDUC 809 - Supporting Readers in Elementary Classrooms

Credits: 4

This course is the second of a 2-course sequence for students earning an M.Ed. in Elementary Education, and is taken during the internship year. The course prepares teachers to better understand individual readers in elementary classrooms in order to provide effective supports. The course integrates research and practical applications for elementary literacy intervention strategies. Interns have the opportunity to apply their learning through one-on-one tutoring with students in their internship site. Prereq: EDUC 806; EDUC 808.

Co-requisite: EDUC 901

EDUC 810F - Investigations

Credits: 1-4

Topics may include informal learning, public pedagogies, secondary education, post-secondary education, adult education, extension education, cooperative education, or teaching experiences. Student-selected in one of the areas listed. Electives after consultation with instructor.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

EDUC 810G - Seminar in Adult and Occupational Education

Credits: 1-2

Discussion of current issues, problems, and research and development in vocational/technical and adult education. Students, faculty, and other personnel serve as discussion leaders. Required of departmental graduate students. (Fall semester only.)

Equivalent(s): AOE 998

EDUC 812 - Teaching Multilingual Learners

Credits: 4

This course is for people interested in teaching in schools and/or community agencies serving multilingual populations. Topics include: theories of first and second language acquisition, translanguaging, language policies and laws, strategies for teaching academic content to emerging bilinguals in mainstream classroom, creating classroom/school cultures that invite all students into learning, and the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in linguistically diverse public schools. In addition to designing and exploring a variety of teaching activities and techniques, students conduct a rich collection of field assignments including interviewing bi-/multilingual adults; visiting community agencies; and collaboratively designing community engagement activities.

EDUC #817 - Growing up Male in America

Credits: 4

An integrative view of growing up male in the American culture from birth through adulthood. Analysis of major perspectives on male development and the implications in parenting with specific emphasis on male education. Participants are expected to develop awareness of their own development as a male or alongside males, using current male development perspectives as a guide. They will also create an awareness of how this will affect their behavior toward boys in their classrooms.

EDUC 818 - Critical Social Justice in and Beyond Education

Credits: 4

Students will become familiar with key concepts and principles of critical theory, critical pedagogy, and social justice education so that they may use this body of work to inform their teaching, leadership, and scholarship. We will examine the role of a) schools in providing equity of educational access and outcomes, b) teacher agency to change unjust conditions, and c) micro experiences within schools and the macro layers of context (i.e., history, politics economics, culture).

EDUC 820 - Educational Technology

Credits: 4

Educators with any experience level will develop the skills and mindset to find and use technology tools that can enhance student learning. Assignments and online discussions focus on foundational educational technology topics, including ethical and social justice considerations, best practices, and national technology standards. Assignments are completed using each week's tech tool category, such as presentations, image/video editing, and website creation. Participants will curate educational technology tools that fit their preferences and needs. This class will include the focus on facilitating remote learning.

EDUC 833 - Teaching Writing in the 21st Century

Credits: 4

An examination of the challenges to teaching writing in the present age of high stakes testing and audit culture. The course addresses theories and methods for teaching writing in a complex society that values a range of expressive forms, including digital technologies, social media, film and video. Special emphasis on multi-model literacies in K-12 classrooms. Exploration of language diversity, the relationship among reading, writing, and literacy development in content-specific areas, and student-centered assessments.

EDUC 834 - Children's Literature

Credits: 4

Interpretive and critical study of literature for children in elementary and middle school settings. Applications of children's literature in educational settings.

EDUC 841 - Exploring Mathematics with Young Children

Credits: 4

A laboratory course offering those who teach young children mathematics, and who are interested in children's discovery learning and creative thinking; offers chance to experience exploratory activities with concrete materials, as well as mathematical investigations, on an adult level, that develop the ability to provide children a mathematically rich environment, to ask problem-posing questions, and to establish a rationale for doing so. Prereq: MATH 601 or MATH 801.

EDUC 845 - Math with Technology in Early Education

Credits: 2

The primary goal of this course is that students gain knowledge of learning standards and teaching methods for the instruction of mathematics in early education settings with infants through 3rd grade. In addition, participants gain experience in applying their newfound knowledge in the areas of mathematics with technology through a combination of teaching and digital experiences. On-line course; no campus visits required. Please note the minimal technical requirements for a UNH e-course.

EDUC 850 - Introduction to Exceptionality

Credits: 4

A life span perspective of the social, psychological, and physical characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities including intellectual, sensory, motor, health, and communication impairments. Includes implications for educational and human service delivery.

EDUC 851A - Educating Exceptional Learners: Elementary

Credits: 4

Foundations of special education and an introduction to a variety of service delivery models with an emphasis on educating all learners in heterogeneous classrooms. Instructional strategies and supports for all students, particularly those with mild and moderate disabilities, will be the primary focus. Special Fee.

EDUC 851B - Educating Exceptional Learners: Secondary

Credits: 4

Foundations of special education and an introduction to a variety of service delivery models with an emphasis on educating all learners in heterogeneous classrooms. Instructional strategies and supports for all students, particularly those with mild and moderate disabilities, will be the primary focus. Preparation for students' transitions to post-secondary life will be included. Special Fee.

EDUC #851C - Educating Exceptional Learners: Related Services

Credits: 4

An overview of special education and related services in an educational setting. Focus on support services provided to general education and special education teachers, including laws relating to special populations, how related services interact with classroom and special educators, IEPs, and other topics that impact services provided to students with special needs.

EDUC #852 - Contemporary Issues in Learning Disabilities

Credits: 4

Critical analysis of current and historical conceptions of learning disability in the areas of definition, supporting theories, assessment practice, and teaching methodologies. Focus will be on contemporary issues in the field that relate to working with students labeled as learning disabled at both elementary and secondary levels.

EDUC 856 - Supporting Families of Individuals with Exceptionalities

Credits: 4

An introduction to family system theory and the implications for families having members with exceptionalities. Issues addressed include diagnosis and prognosis, coping strategies, communication and team collaboration, cross-cultural competence, and agency and school delivery of services. Emphasis is on proactive collaboration with family members.

Equivalent(s): EDUC 949

EDUC #857 - Contemporary Issues in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Credits: 4

The goal of this course is to enhance students understanding of contemporary issues related to educating students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The course is grounded in a theoretical foundation that values the perspectives of individuals with ASD in academic, research, policy, and clinical endeavors. Learning outcomes focus on strategies for identifying opportunities for learning, communication, literacy, and social relationships in a variety of inclusive environments.

EDUC 860 - Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs

Credits: 4

The needs of children (birth to eight years) with developmental problems or who are at risk for disabilities. Strengths and special needs of such children; causes, identification, and treatment; current legislation; parent and family concerns; program models.

EDUC 861 - Inclusive Curriculum for Young Children with Special Needs

Credits: 4

Classroom applications for constructivist theory. Curriculum planning and implementation; overview of research and theory related to teaching and learning of specific content areas, with emphasis on integrated approach to early childhood curriculum. Stresses the reciprocal nature of student-teacher relationship.

EDUC 862 - Curriculum for Young Children with Special Needs: Evaluation and Program Design

Credits: 4

Overview of evaluation and intervention issues relevant to early childhood special education, focusing on ages three through eight. Norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment tools. Judgment-based evaluation and observation skills. Translation of evaluation information into goals and objectives for individual education programs. Developing appropriate programs in inclusive settings.

Equivalent(s): EDUC 947

EDUC 867 - Students, Teachers, and the Law

Credits: 4

Our public schools play a vital role in our society. What shall be taught and who shall teach our children are perennial questions. This course explores how the law impacts the educational lives of students and teachers, including issues of church-state relations, free speech, dress codes, and search and seizure. (Also offered as JUST 867.)

Equivalent(s): JUST 867

EDUC 868 - Students and Higher Education Law

Credits: 2

Higher education plays an important role in American society. It is a lever for developing human capital, a drier or economic growth, and the center for knowledge production. It influences policy agendas at the regional, state, and national levels. Because of its central role in society, achieving an understanding of the legal forces that structure higher education is important. This course explores the legal parameters that impact students. It is a companion to EDUC 869 Faculty and Higher Education Law.

EDUC 869 - Faculty and Higher Education Law

Credits: 2

The US system of higher education has tremendous impact on the social, political, and knowledge issues of our society. Knowledge of how, why, and what parameters impact the work of US colleges and universities is critical to understanding the institutions of higher education. the role of law is important and pervasive in society and is also of importance in higher education. This course focuses on the law of US higher education and how it structures and impacts the professoriate. It will explore such topics as academic freedom, employment, intellectual property, and discrimination.

EDUC 881 - Introduction to Statistics: Inquiry, Analysis, and Decision Making

Credits: 4

An applied statistics course that covers introductory level approaches to examining quantitative information. Students spend about half of class time in the computer lab analyzing real data from the behavioral and social sciences. An emphasis is placed on the role of statistics in making empirically-based policy decisions.

EDUC 882 - Introduction to Research Methods

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to research methods in education and the social sciences. Issues from a wide variety of perspectives on research are covered, including the formal procedures employed by experimental psychologists, qualitative perspectives, and techniques used by researchers involved in exploratory investigations in schools and other real-life settings. The design and implementation of research studies is contextualized in current educational and social science issues.

EDUC 884 - Educators as Researchers

Credits: 4

With the guidance and support of the instructor, program participants will select an issue in education to explore in detail. They will articulate question (s) for inquiry, conduct a literature review related to their question (s), design and undertake their research study, and report their findings. Program participants will present their work within the context of the course. This course should be taken towards the end of your studies.

Equivalent(s): EDUC 984

EDUC 885 - Introduction to Assessment

Credits: 4

In this course, we examine educational assessment within three different paradigms. First we study the bases for assessment. Next we learn how one designs and administers assessment tasks within the classroom setting. Finally, we examine how one should interpret and utilize the results from standardized tests. We work to become intelligent readers, critics, and consumers of educational assessments. The topics covered in this course are relevant to several other fields including (but not limited to) psychology, social work, family studies, and nonprofit management.

EDUC 886 - Issues in Assessment: Historical Contexts, Perennial Dilemmas, Current Trends

Credits: 4

This course examines educational assessment, broadly defined, from historical, practical, and critical perspectives and explores definitions, theories, and current issues in assessment. Through this course, students will look at assessment not only as a continual process for the teacher and administrator, but also a discrete process for measurement professionals. Students will analyze current research on and practices of classroom assessment, and will critique current educational assessment programs, policies, and issues that arise from No Child Left Behind, Race to the Top, Common Core State Standards, the achievement gap, competency-based assessment, and the assessment of teacher quality. Students will also explore alternative approaches to these policies with implications for evaluation and assessment, and generate ways to discuss with their communities the financial and human costs and benefits of these programs and policies.

EDUC #891 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Science

Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide experiences and resources that will support individuals who are planning to teach middle or high school science. Through interactive activities, readings, and class discussions, the class explores key elements and challenges of secondary science teaching and provide a foundation for continued growth and reflection throughout the students' teaching careers. Some of the main topics discussed in this course are national and state science standards, reform-based approaches to instruction, the use of technology in science teaching, laboratory safety, curriculum evaluation, and assessment.

EDUC 894 - Pro-seminar in Teacher Leadership

Credits: 2

This course will help experienced teachers to establish a framework for collaboration and inquiry focused on questions about teaching, learning, and school reform. Students will develop an academic and research agenda tied to their professional development as educators. Coursework will emphasize approaches to action research and the teacher-as-researcher.

EDUC 897 - Special Topics in Education

Credits: 1-4

An experimental course for the purpose of introducing a new course or teaching a special topic for a semester in an area of specialization in Education.

EDUC #899 - Master's Thesis

Credits: 1-10

Prereq: permission of the department. Cr/F.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.

EDUC 900A - Internship and Seminar in Teaching

Credits: 2-6

A two semester, full-time, supervised internship consisting of less-than-full-time teaching responsibility in selected educational settings and programs. Weekly seminars and occasional workshops held concurrently with internship. Special fee. Permission required. Cr/F.

EDUC 900B - Internship and Seminar in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 3 or 4

A two semester, supervised internship with a bi-weekly seminar. Admission by Application. Special fee. Permission required. Cr/F.

EDUC 900C - Internship and Seminar in Special Education

Credits: 3 or 6

A two semester, supervised internship with a weekly seminar. Admission by application. Special fee. Cr/F.

EDUC 901A - Internship and Seminar in Teaching

Credits: 2-6

A two semester, full-time, supervised internship consisting of less-than-full-time teaching responsibility in selected educational settings and programs. Weekly seminars and occasional workshops held concurrently with internship. Special fee. Permission required. Cr/F.

EDUC 901B - Internship and Seminar in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 3 or 4

A two semester, supervised internship with a bi-weekly seminar. Admission by Application. Special fee. Permission required. Cr/F.

EDUC 901C - Internship and Seminar in Special Education

Credits: 3 or 6

A two semester, supervised internship with a weekly seminar. Admission by application. Special fee. Cr/F.

EDUC 902 - Doctoral Pro-seminar

Credits: 4

Introduces students to the range of scholarly inquiry undertaken in doctoral programs. Students develop a broad understanding of educational studies and analyze various research paradigms in terms of assumptions, methods, and outcomes. Coursework includes developing a proposal. Matriculated doctoral students only.

EDUC 904 - Qualitative Inquiry in Research

Credits: 4

Course will offer a theoretical background for conducting qualitative inquiry in social science research and practical experience in the design of research studies. Efforts focus on understanding how the type or tradition of qualitative inquiry shapes study design across conceptualization and research question formation phases as well as preliminary considerations about evidence. Critical perspectives in qualitative inquiry also explored. Through comparative analysis of different qualitative traditions, students will be prepared to make informed decisions about what approaches to use in their studies and why they are using them. Prereq: premission.

EDUC 905 - Critical Inquiry in Education

Credits: 4

Designed for advanced students to study philosophical methods needed for critical inquiry in education. Primary emphasis on practical mastery of: the construction and assessment of cogent argumentation; identification of common fallacies in reasoning; conceptual analysis; the appraisal of definitions, slogans, and metaphors in educational thought; and the disentangling of conceptual, factual, and normative claims associated with practical educational issues. Investigation of the difference between critique and criticism. Prereq: permission.

EDUC 906 - The Literature Review in Educational Research: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Credits: 4

This course introduces graduate students to the rhetorical and analytic skills necessary for writing a well-structured, soundly presented literature review. This course covers systematic topics selection, research analysis, how to limit your research topic and focus your literature search, how to appraise your sources, negotiate the range of books, periodicals and reports you collect about your study, and writing, revising and editing strategies. Upon completing the course, students will have produced a literature review using a minimum of 30 self-selected research articles, books and digital resources. The course is appropriate for master's and doctoral students who are writing course papers, dissertations or theses.

EDUC 918A - Seminar on Research in Literacy Instruction

Credits: 2

The purpose of this seminar is to study the disciplinary traditions that inform contemporary conceptions of literacy instruction both in and out of school. It will draw on research from social and cognitive psychology, literary theory, cultural studies, and feminist epistemology. An emphasis will be placed on preparing doctoral students to meet the needs of students in an increasing pluralistic population.

EDUC #923 - Group Counseling

Credits: 4

Reviews theoretical and applied processes of group counseling. Class includes a laboratory experience to examine interactive behavior as a group member and facilitator. Pre- or Coreq: EDUC 919 or EDUC 920.

EDUC #925 - Counseling Internship I

Credits: 4

Seminar accompanies supervised field experience at approved field site. Orientation to the diverse roles and functions of counselors in school and agency settings. Discussion and educational supervision of students' counseling and consultation activities at field site. Pre- or Coreq: EDUC 919, EDUC 920, EDUC #923, EDUC 924. Special fee.

EDUC #926 - Counseling Internship II

Credits: 4

Seminar accompanies supervised field experience at approved internship site. Small group format uses audio-taped samples of counseling sessions, providing critiques and educational supervision of counseling and consulting activities. Prereq: EDUC #925. Special fee.

EDUC #933 - Developmental Models of Comprehensive School Guidance

Credits: 4

Course includes a supervised field experience. Provides a review of child and adolescent psychosocial development as a foundation for learning and high level functioning. Students are expected to develop awareness of their own psychosocial adaptations. State and national guidelines provide a framework for teaching pro-social skills models. Prereq: EDUC 919, EDUC 920, EDUC #925.

EDUC 935A - Seminar and Practicum in Teaching

Credits: 4

For new graduate students admitted to the M.Ed. or M.A.T. program in the Department of Education. In-school experiences to develop introductory skills in observation and teaching. On-site seminars for analysis and evaluation. Assessment and advising related to teaching as a career. Prerequisite for further work toward a teacher licensure. Minimum of 7 hours a week, plus travel time, required. Prereq: permission. Special fee. Cr/F.

EDUC 939 - Assessment and Teaching of Children with Learning Difficulties

Credits: 4

A two-semester course to develop teacher competency to analyze learners and learning environments; specify learner characteristics; and design, implement, and evaluate appropriate educational interventions in the areas of language, mathematics, reading, behavior, and social skills. Focus on children with mild and moderate learning difficulties in regular classrooms. Prereq: EDUC 850; 851 and permission.

EDUC 940 - Assessment and Teaching of Children with Learning Difficulties

Credits: 4

A two-semester course to develop teacher competency to analyze learners and learning environments; specify learner characteristics; and design, implement, and evaluate appropriate educational interventions in the areas of language, mathematics, reading, behavior, and social skills. Focus on children with mild and moderate learning difficulties in regular classrooms. Prereq: EDUC 850; 851 and permission.

EDUC 941 - Diversity and Child Development

Credits: 4

Focus on typical child development from birth to age eight. Considers theories of child development and assessment from historical and contemporary perspectives, with emphasis on observation during naturally occurring activities as a means of learning about child development. Includes child study.

EDUC 942 - Socio-cultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning

Credits: 4

Considers the growing body of knowledge on the role of play in children's development; includes examination of contemporary constructive theory. Organized around theme of teacher researcher. Assignments include research review and student-designed study of child development issue.

EDUC 948 - Leadership and Advocacy in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 4

Examination of roles and responsibilities of early childhood professionals, with emphasis on action research skills, analysis of contemporary problems, strategies for advocacy, and program leadership skills.

EDUC 950 - Understanding Culture in Research on Learning and Development

Credits: 4

Examines contemporary debates in the social sciences and educational interventions where notions of "culture" are particularly consequential. Four paradigmatic and pan-disciplinary orientations to understanding and researching cultural or contextual phenomena are examined - culture as: factor, practice, oppression, and liberation. Cultural psychology, anthropology, history, critical sociology, sociolinguistics, and cross-cultural research examined as challenge to contemporary theories of child development. Implications for educational theory and practice. Prereq: permission.

EDUC 951 - Laws and Regulations Affecting the Education of Students with Disabilities

Credits: 4

Analysis of current federal and state policies affecting students with disabilities. Focus on Section 504 and IDEA. The role of policy making and constitutional and ethical issues discussed.

EDUC 956 - Learning to Listen: Developing Positive Behavior Supports for Students with Challenging Behaviors

Credits: 4

One of a sequence of courses that leads to New Hampshire certification in Mental Retardation. Meets some of the requirements for certification of the Council for Exceptional Children. Behavioral challenges are the most frequent reason students with significant disabilities are excluded from inclusive settings in schools and communities. Course provides knowledge and skills in behavior as communication, utilization of functional assessments, and development of strategies to support students who experience challenging behaviors.

EDUC 957 - Collaborative Models of Teaching, Learning, and Leading

Credits: 4

Building professional communities that nurture and support learning across the career span is a complex process that includes building productive relationships with co-workers who hold a variety of positions in schools: teachers, administrators, counselors, specialist, interns and paraprofessionals. This course examines a range of collaborative practices in schools including mentoring, co-teaching, and collaborative supervision. The central question is, "How do collaborative versus noncollaborative environments affect teaching and learning for students, teachers and administrators?"

EDUC 958 - Analysis of Teaching and Learning

Credits: 4

Examination of and reflection on the nature of teaching will serve as the basis for analysis. A variety of strategies for analysis of teaching will be explored and implemented. Student-initiated inquiry into specific aspects of teaching will provide practical application of course material. Prereq: teaching experience.

EDUC 959 - Issues in Education

Credits: 4

Emphasizes the development of understandings, dispositions, and skills necessary to effectively participate in P-12 reform discussion and decision-making. The course focuses on foundational issues related to a) the legitimacy of public education, b) accountability-based national reform efforts, and c) the goals and content of school curricula. This on-line course is required for the M.Ed. in Educational Studies or elective for other degrees.

EDUC #960 - Curriculum Development

Credits: 4

Students learn how to develop the curriculum for schools and school districts. The course builds skills and infuses an understanding of the role that curriculum development plays. It explores how current curricular issues influence the development of curriculum.

EDUC 962 - Educational Finance and Business Management

Credits: 4

Principles of financing education, budgetary procedures, computer simulations, and business management. Analysis of N.H. school funding system. Handling practical school finance problems is part of the project work.

EDUC 964 - Human Resources in Education

Credits: 4

Problems arising from the communications process. Implications of group problem-solving processes. Interpersonal relations and group dynamics among students, faculty, staff, administration, and the community. Application of theories.

EDUC 965 - Educational Supervision and Evaluation

Credits: 4

Theoretical foundations and practical applications of supervisory and instructional practices and procedures; consideration of observation instruments and techniques. Teacher evaluation and supervision reviewed. Each student conducts a field supervision project. Prereq: teaching experience or permission.

EDUC 967 - School Law

Credits: 4

Relationship of law to public education. Emphasis on federal constitution, New Hampshire statutes, and case law related to public interests served by elementary and secondary education. Special topics: church-state relationship, due process, desegregation, teacher employment, discrimination, negotiations, student rights, tort liability.

EDUC 968 - Collective Bargaining in Public Education

Credits: 4

An examination of collective bargaining as practiced by school boards, administrators, and teacher organizations. Consideration is given to collective bargaining statutes, case law, employee relations boards, unit determinations, exclusive representation, union security provisions, scope of bargaining, good faith, grievance procedures, bargaining strategies, strikes, public interest, mediation, fact finding, arbitration, and the administration of the negotiated contract.

EDUC 970 - Foundations for Leadership in Higher Education

Credits: 4

Seminar for master's and doctoral level students in education and related fields. Focus on the organization, structure, function, and dynamics of institutions of higher education, and the corollary roles and responsibilities of leaders in academic and student affairs. Intended for those currently in or planning to enter into leadership roles in a college or university.

EDUC 972 - Introduction to Educational Evaluation

Credits: 4

This is a graduate level course that provides a broad overview of evaluation methods that influence K-12 education, as well as the nonprofit sector. While educational assessments include a full range of procedures used to gain information about student learning (e.g., observations and paper-and-pencil tests), educational evaluation is the process of determining something about the merit, worth, or significance of that information. Therefore, the goal of this course is to provide students with an introduction to educational evaluation from both a practitioner and a programmatic perspective. To meet this goal students explore the importance of evaluation across educational contexts; evaluate student achievement; develop a program logic model; and conduct an evaluability assessment.

EDUC 973 - Policy, Politics, and Planning in Education

Credits: 4

Policy systems and fundamental values shaping the development and enactment of education policy at the federal, state, and local levels.

EDUC 974 - Educational Administrative Internship

Credits: 4

This course is a field-based internship for students enrolled in a variety of graduate programs including masters, education specialist, doctorate, and educational credential programs. Students can intern in educational settings including schools, school/districts, educational agencies, centers, and in a higher education. Supervision is provided by university faculty and a cooperating administrator or other appropriate official from the internship site.

EDUC 975 - Advanced Education Field Project

Credits: 4

This course is field based. The student will work with an educational institution (e.g., school, school district, higher education) or agency (e.g., Department of Education, educational center, higher education) with a cooperating administrator/appropriate educator and a university supervisor. The field project will address a problem of practice of an educational institution, serve as a pilot study, or consist of an action research project.

EDUC 976 - Policy and Governance in Higher Education

Credits: 4

Seminar for master's and doctoral level students in Education and related fields. Examination of federal and state policies and regulations affecting two-year and four-year colleges and universities, and governance practices necessary to achieve institutional mission. Consideration of rationales for public oversight and financing of higher education, controversial topics (e.g., affirmative action, accreditation, proprietary institutions, distance learning), and strategies for effective shared governance are included.

EDUC 977 - Leadership: The District Level Administrator

Credits: 4

Examines the school superintendency and other district level positions of leadership that comprise the administrative team, focusing on the complexity of the current role and relationships, the critical issues facing school leaders, and the skills necessary for success as an educational leader in today's climate. Students analyze contemporary issues of school governance and examine problems of practice to understand the role of school superintendent and other district level administrators from a theoretical, political, and contemporary perspective.

EDUC 978 - Applied Regression Analysis in Educational Research

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to simple and multiple regression analysis, specifically as the methods are applied to research questions in educational research. Students learn about the linear regression model and its assumptions, how to use SPSS to fit the model to data, and how to interpret results. Students will also learn how to: evaluate the tenability of the model's assumptions; conduct thoughtful model building; model the effects of categorical predictors and statistical interactions; and handle multi-collinearity. The use of statistical techniques are modeled in class and then students apply these new techniques to datasets of educational relevance from a variety of sources, including educational surveys, observational studies, and randomized experiments. Students learn how to interpret the outcomes of their analyses thoughtfully and meaningfully and are asked to communicate these interpretations clearly and concisely in writing. Prereq: EDUC 881 or equivalent.

EDUC 979 - Applied Multilevel Modeling

Credits: 4

This applied course in multilevel modeling is designed for graduate students in education and the social sciences who are interested in conducting statistical analysis to answer questions about (1) contextual effects on individual outcomes, and (2) individual change over time. Topics addressed include exploratory analyses of multilevel data, conditional and unconditional models, fixed and random effects, model assumptions, model fit, non-linear change, discontinuous change, time-varying predictors, unequally spaced measurement occasions, and three-level multilevel models. Prereq: EDUC 978 or the equivalent.

EDUC 981 - Quantitative Inquiry: Methods and Techniques of Educational Research

Credits: 4

Conceptual aspects and practical realities of the research process applied to problems in education and human service disciplines. Develops skills necessary to use, as well as conduct, research.

EDUC 982 - Qualitative Fieldwork & Data Analysis

Credits: 4

This course provides guidance and fieldwork opportunities for students to apply principles and strategies for qualitative fieldwork and data analysis. It focuses on how qualitative researchers generate, use, and represent data to generate ideas and build theory. Prereq: EDUC 904 or course equivalent.

EDUC #983 - Advanced Psychology of Human Learning

Credits: 4

Review and integration of learning theory, teacher effectiveness, motivation theory, and development through adolescence; application of these to teaching generally and to the areas of specialization of the participants. Prereq: EDUC 801 or equivalent.

EDUC #985 - Contemporary Issues and Theories in Human Learning and Development

Credits: 4

This course explores the human drive to know one's world. Although the primary focus is on traditional school-aged learners, views of the learner both in and out of school and across the life-span are considered as well. Theoretical positions will include: cognitive developmental theory; an analysis of positions implicit in traditional and innovative schooling practices; and theories about the social organization of knowledge. Attention will be given to educational applications of recent advances in contemporary theories of learning and development, as well as changes in pedagogy and assessment. Prereq: EDUC 801, or equivalent introduction to human development and/or educational psychology;/ or permission.

EDUC 986 - Philosophy of Education

Credits: 4

Seminar in comparative analysis of educational theories and the philosophical foundations upon which they are based. Application of theoretical criteria for evaluating educational practices and for developing one's own philosophy of education. Prereq: permission.

EDUC 991 - Curriculum Theory I

Credits: 4

This course focuses on the historical, cultural, and political dimensions of curriculum theory in the United States and Canada. An emphasis is placed on the underlying philosophical perspectives that inform the field of curriculum theory, including, but not limited to feminist theory, critical race theory, queer, and post-colonial theory.

EDUC 992 - Curriculum Theory II

Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is (a.) to critically examine the various methodological approaches for conducting educational research within the broader field of transnational curriculum studies and (b.) to appraise the tension between a range of disciplinary frameworks that inform curriculum theory, government policy, and its respective implementation both inside and outside the classroom. Studies include analysis of alternative curricular arrangements within global, national, and local contexts. Curriculum Theory I is recommended, but not required.

EDUC 995 - Independent Study

Credits: 1-4

Opportunity for intensive investigation of a special problem or issue in the field of education. Prereq: permission.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

EDUC 998 - Special Topics

Credits: 1-4

Study of a particular theoretical, methodological, or policy issue. May be offered off campus as professional development.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

EDUC 999 - Doctoral Research

Credits: 0

Cr/F.