Psychology (PSYC)

http://www.unh.edu/psychology

Degree Offered: Ph.D.

This program is offered in Durham.

Department of Psychology offers a four- or five-year program of study leading to the doctor of philosophy degree. The basic goal of the program is the development of behavioral scientists who have a broad knowledge of psychology, can teach and communicate effectively, and can carry out sound research in an area of specialization. Although some students seek employment outside academia, the program is oriented toward developing the skills required by the research psychologist who intends to become a college or university teacher.

Areas in which the student may specialize are brain, behavior, and cognition; developmental psychology; or social psychology/personality. The department does not offer training in clinical or counseling psychology.

Distinctive Features of the Program

All psychology graduate students in the Ph.D. program receive a stipend and a full tuition waiver for up to five years. A low graduate student/faculty ratio provides opportunities to work closely with one or more faculty mentors. Graduates typically acquire tenure-track academic or postdoctoral positions at colleges and universities across the U.S.

The Department of Psychology is a national model for preparing future faculty. All graduate students teach Introduction to Psychology while taking a year-long seminar in the teaching of psychology, as well as one or two undergraduate survey courses in statistics and/or the student's area of specialization.

There are active research laboratories in all areas represented in the graduate program. The department has strong partnerships with such nationally recognized programs as UNH's Child Study and Development Center and the Family Research Laboratory. UNH also has a Center for Teaching Excellence to help graduate students and faculty improve the quality of their teaching.

Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the requirements for admission to the Graduate School, applicants must intend to be full-time students working toward the doctoral degree (not just the master's degree), and they must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores, along with other standard application forms. The subject test in psychology is recommended. Scores must be current, within five years.

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 894 - Advanced Research

Credits: 4 or 8

Student designs and conducts original research that culminates in a paper of publishable quality. Completion of either this course or PSYC 899 satisfies the department's research requirement for the master's degree. May be taken for 4 credits per semester in each of two semesters or 8 credits in one semester. Maximum of 8 credits. Cr/F.

PSYC 899 - Master's Thesis

Credits: 4 or 8

four credits per semester in each of two semesters or 8 credits in one semester. Maximum of 8 credits. Cr/F.

PSYC 901 - Graduate Pro-seminar

Credits: 0

Students and graduate faculty in psychology meet periodically for a mutual exchange on current issues in psychology. Cr/F.

PSYC 902 - Graduate Pro-seminar

Credits: 0

Students and graduate faculty in psychology meet periodically for a mutual exchange on current issues in psychology. Cr/F.

PSYC 904 - First-year Graduate Seminar

Credits: 4

Coverage of fields of psychology represented in the department's graduate program and taught in the department's introductory psychology course that psychology graduate students teach during their third year in the program. Course is focused on providing common background among students when they enroll in advanced graduate seminars and on assuring they have certain foundational knowledge when they begin to teach the introductory psychology course. Course is required of all first-year psychology graduate students in fall semester. Taught in seminar format. PSYC majors only.

PSYC 905 - Research Methodology and Statistics I

Credits: 4

A consideration of research techniques and problems of methodology in psychology. The first semester stresses the principles of statistical inference, correlational approaches, and their interrelatedness in design. Topics considered include probability theory, linear regression, function-free prediction, the theory underlying statistical inference, parametric and nonparametric tests of significance, and principles of analysis of variance. The second semester extends correlational approach to the techniques and methodology of multiple regression and considers the appropriate use and theoretical bases of complex designs. Prereq: undergraduate statistics and experimental psychology.

PSYC 906 - Research Methodology and Statistics II

Credits: 4

A consideration of research techniques and problems of methodology in psychology. The first semester stresses the principles of statistical inference, correlational approaches, and their interrelatedness in design. Topics considered include probability theory, linear regression, function-free prediction, the theory underlying statistical inference, parametric and nonparametric tests of significance, and principles of analysis of variance. The second semester extends correlational approach to the techniques and methodology of multiple regression and considers the appropriate use and theoretical bases of complex designs. Prereq: undergraduate statistics and experimental psychology.

PSYC 907 - Research Methods and Statistics III

Credits: 4

The application of multivariate methods of data analysis in psychological research: multiple regression, analysis of covariance, Hotelling's T2 multivariate analysis of variance, path analysis, discriminant functions, canonical correlation, factor analysis.

PSYC 909 - Advanced Seminar in Quantitative and Analytic Methods

Credits: 4

Advanced treatment of methodological topics of current interest. Content varies: representative topics include field research, surveys, time series, causal analyses, log-linear models, formal and mathematical models, and computer simulation. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 914 - Advanced Seminar in Cognition

Credits: 4

An in-depth examination of one or more specific topics in cognition including issues in memory, attention, the use and development of language, and cognitive science. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 917 - Advanced Seminar in Sensory and Perceptual Processes

Credits: 4

Comprehensive examination of a specific topic in sensory and perceptual processes. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 933 - Advanced Seminar in Physiological Psychology

Credits: 4

In-depth examination of a specific topic in the neurosciences. Topics vary depending on interests of instructor and students. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 945 - Advanced Seminar in Behavioral Analysis

Credits: 4

Current empirical and theoretical issues in the analysis of behavior. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 954 - Advanced Seminar in Social Psychology

Credits: 4

Intensive coverage of the experimental and theoretical literature in a selected area of basic or applied social psychology. Students participate directly in the conduct of the seminar by means of individual topical discussions, development and/or execution of research designs, and critical assessment of the current state of the topic area under discussion. Illustrative topics: political behavior, para-linguistics and non-verbal communication, ethnic and racial prejudice, and environmental psychology. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 974 - Advanced Seminar in the History and Theory of Psychology

Credits: 4

In-depth examination of a specific topic in the history and/or theory of psychology. Topics vary each time the seminar is offered. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 982 - Advanced Seminar in Developmental Psychology

Credits: 4

In-depth analysis of one or several specific topics or issues in developmental psychology. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 991 - Practicum and Seminar in the Teaching of Psychology

Credits: 6

Practicum offers the student an opportunity to teach introductory psychology under close supervision from the staff. The seminar is coordinated with this experience and focuses on both practical and theoretical issues of significance in the teaching/learning process at the college level.

PSYC 992 - Practicum and Seminar in the Teaching of Psychology

Credits: 6

Practicum offers the student an opportunity to teach introductory psychology under close supervision from the staff. The seminar is coordinated with this experience and focuses on both practical and theoretical issues of significance in the teaching/learning process at the college level.

PSYC 995 - Reading and Research

Credits: 1-4

A) Cognition/Psycholinguistics; B) Developmental Psychology; C) History and Theory of Psychology; D) Learning and Behavior Analysis; E) Personality/Psychopathology; F) Physiological Psychology; G) Sensation/Perception; H) Social Psychology; I) Statistics/Methodology. As part of the development as an independent scholar, the student is encouraged to plan (1) broad reading in an area; (2) intensive investigation of a special problem; or (3) experimental testing of a particular question. Requires approval of both adviser and faculty member directing project. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 998 - Problems and Issues

Credits: 4

Seminar on a problem that has been the subject of specialized research and study by a member of the faculty. Topic and instructor vary. May be repeated for credit.

PSYC 999 - Doctoral Research

Credits: 0

Cr/F.