English (ENGL)

http://www.unh.edu/english

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.A., M.F.A., M.S.T.

This program is offered in Durham.

The Department of English offers four advanced degrees: master of arts with options in literature or English language and linguistics; master of science for teachers; master of fine arts in writing; and doctor of philosophy.

Admission Requirements

All applicants must submit writing samples in accordance with guidelines available from the English department graduate office. All applicants (except those for the M.F.A. and M.S.T.) must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the GRE. Applicants for the doctor of philosophy degree program in literature must also submit scores for the subject test of literature in English. Applicants for the degree of master of science for teachers (M.S.T.) must have completed education courses sufficient for certification, or have three years teaching experience, or currently hold a full­-time teaching position. A student admitted to the Ph.D. program must hold an M.A. degree or be in the final stage of completing requirements for the degree.

All applicants who wish to be considered for teaching assistantships or tuition scholarships must complete an application form, available from the English department graduate office or from the website listed above, or from the graduate school forms page (see the Graduate Aid section).

English (ENGL)

ENGL 800 - Studies in Literature

Credits: 4

Students in the MAT, MEd, and MST programs, as well as non-degree students, can register for graduate course work in English under this number. The precise topics and focus of each section vary. Topics include Old English Literature, Medieval Literature, 16th century, 17th century, 18th century, English Romantic Period, Victorian Period, 20th and 21st Century, Drama, Novel, Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, A Literary Problem, Literature of the Renaissance, Postcolonial Literature, 20th to 21st Century American Literature. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. Note: Students in the MA and PhD programs in English may not take English 800 for credit toward their degrees. English 800 will only be offered on the Manchester campus.

ENGL 803 - Travel Writing

Credits: 4

A graduate workshop devoted to reading and writing narratives of place. Travel writing requires the author to research and reflect, exploring both the external--the place--and the internal--the author's experience. Students write multiple travel pieces and read widley essays of place by writers such as Tom Bissell, John Steinbeck, Pico Iyer, Stephanie Grist, and Eliza Griswold. Course may be repeated for credit with permission.

ENGL 803T - Travel Writing

Credits: 4

A graduate workshop devoted to reading and writing narratives of place. Travel writing requires the author to research and reflect, exploring both the external--the place--and the internal--the author's experience. Students write multiple travel pieces and read widley essays of place by writers such as Tom Bissell, John Steinbeck, Pico Iyer, Stephanie Grist, and Eliza Griswold. Course may be repeated for credit with permission.

ENGL 804 - Advanced Nonfiction Writing

Credits: 4

This workshop embraces all forms of narrative nonfiction, including essays, memoir, literary journalism, and travel writing. Students write multiple pieces that serve as the heart of class discussion. In addition, the class discusses elements of craft and a myriad of selected readings that reflect the genre's range. May be repeated for credit with approval of the MFA director.

ENGL 805 - Advanced Poetry Workshop

Credits: 4

Workshop discussion of advanced writing problems and submitted poems. Individual conferences with instructor. Prereq: writing poetry or equivalent. Written permission of instructor required for registration. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department chairperson.

ENGL 806 - The Art of Research for Creative Writers

Credits: 4

Many writers think that the heart of creative nonfiction is style, but in truth, the genre's soul is in its content. This course covers tools such as intimate reporting, periodicals, the Internet, and first-hand observation to research people, places, issues, and history. The skills learned will serve graduate students of all kinds of writing, from fiction to academic. Permission of instructor required. Special fee.

ENGL 807 - Fiction: Form and Technique

Credits: 4

A writer's view of the forms, techniques, and theories of fiction. The novels, short stories, and works of criticism studied vary, depending on the instructor.

ENGL 808 - Nonfiction: Form and Technique

Credits: 4

A writer's view of contemporary nonfiction, emphasizing the choices the writer faces in the process of research and writing.

ENGL 809 - Poetry: Form and Technique

Credits: 4

A writer's view of the problems, traditions, and structures of poetry.

ENGL 810 - Teaching Writing

Credits: 1-6

An introduction to various methods of teaching writing. Combines a review of theories, methods, and texts with direct observation of teaching practice.

ENGL 812 - Writing the Creative Nonfiction Book

Credits: 4

In this course, students learn to flesh out an idea for a book of creative nonfiction, which could either be literary journalism - a tale based on reportage - or memoir. Students focus on pulling multiple themes together in a strong narrative. By semester's end, students have written a book proposal and a first chapter. Students are asked to arrive at the first class with a topic researched enough to begin the book process. Permission of instructor required. May be repeated for credit up to 8 credits.

ENGL 814 - Literary Theory

Credits: 4

Major theoretical approaches to literature and its contexts; a range of works from ancient Greece to the present. Questions addressed include: What is literature? What methods might one use to analyze literary texts? What role might cultural and social conditions play in our understanding of literature? How have traditional answers to these and other questions about literature been contested? Lecture-discussion format.

ENGL 815 - Teaching English as a Second Language: Theory and Methods

Credits: 4

A study of how linguistic, psychological, sociological, and neurological theory influences or determines the choice of methods of language teaching. Research on second language acquisition and bilingualism, language aptitude, and the cultural context of language acquisition. Includes an introduction to standard and exotic methods of language teaching.

ENGL 816 - Curriculum, Materials and Assessment in English as a Second Language

Credits: 4

A study of the problems in designing an effective teaching program for various types of ESL students. An introduction to competence and aptitude testing and to the choosing and adapting of materials for ESL classes.

ENGL 819 - Sociolinguistics Survey

Credits: 4

How language varies according to the characteristics of its speakers: age, sex, ethnicity, attitude, time, and class. Quantitative analysis methods; relationship to theoretical linguistics. Focus is on English, but some other languages are examined. Prereq: introduction to linguistics or permission.

ENGL 827 - Issues in Second Language Writing

Credits: 4

Study of various issues in second language writing theory, research, instruction and administration. Topics include the characteristics and needs of second language writers, second language writing processes, contrastive rhetoric, grammar instruction, teacher and peer feedback, assessment, course design and placement.

ENGL 829 - Spec Top/Composition Studies

Credits: 4

Advanced course on a topic chosen by the instructor. Precise topics and methods of each section vary. Possible topics include: alternative discourses and rhetorics; contrastive rhetoric; electronic discourse and digital rhetoric; women's rhetorics and feminist pedagogies; Montaigne and the essay tradition; theories of literacy; theories of persuasive writing; theories of transactional writing; and written discourse analysis. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details see the course descriptions available in the English Department.

ENGL 830 - Practicum in Teaching English and the Language Arts

Credits: 1-6

A site-based course for practicing teachers that features in-class observations and demonstrations, individual consultation, and group meetings in the schools. Prereq: permission. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits.

ENGL 838 - Topics in Asian American Studies

Credits: 4

Study of literature, history, scholarship, and current thought by and about Asian America. Representative works from among Japanese Americans, Chinese Americans, Korean Americans, Southeast Asian Americans, South Asian Americans.

ENGL 846 - Studies in American Drama

Credits: 4

Topics vary from year to year. Examples: 20th-century American drama; contemporary playwrights; theatricality in American life. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL 847 - Studies in American Poetry

Credits: 4

Topics vary from year to year. Examples: poets of the road; Pound and his followers; major American poets; contemporary American poetry. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL 848 - Studies in American Fiction

Credits: 4

Topics vary from year to year. Examples: the romance in America; the short story; realism and naturalism; the city novel; fiction of the thirties. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL 850 - Special Studies in American Literature

Credits: 4

Topics vary from year to year. Examples: the Puritan heritage; ethnic literatures in America; landscapes in American literature; five American lives; pragmatism; American humor; transcendentalism; women regionalists. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

ENGL #851 - Medieval Epic and Romance

Credits: 4

Two major types of medieval narrative; comparative study of works from England, France, Germany, and Iceland, including "Beowulf", "Song of Roland", "Nibelungenlied", Gottfried's "Tristan", Njal's "Saga", and Malory's "Morte d'Arthur". All works read in modern English translations. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL 852 - History of the English Language

Credits: 4

Evolution of English from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day. Relations between linguistic change and literary style.

ENGL #853 - Old English

Credits: 4

Introduction to Old English language and literature through readings of selected poetry and prose.

ENGL 858 - Shakespeare

Credits: 4

A few plays studied intensively. Live and filmed performances included as available.

ENGL #873 - British Literature of the 20th Century

Credits: 4

Poets and novelists of the modernist and postmodernist periods. W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, D.H. Lawrence, and other modernists. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL 879 - Linguistic Field Methods

Credits: 4

Devoted to the study, with use of an informant, of some non-Indo-European language that is unfamiliar to both the students and the instructor at the beginning of the class. The primary aim of the course is to give students a practical introduction to linguistic analysis without the support of a text. Theoretical concepts are introduced as needed. Special fee.

ENGL #880 - English Drama to 1640

Credits: 4

Development of the drama through the Renaissance, emphasizing the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL #881 - English Drama from 1660 to 1800

Credits: 4

Study of selected plays, their performance and their publication. Works by such figures as William Wycherley, Thomas Otway, Mary Pix, George Lillo, Susanna Centlivre, Richard Sheridan, and Elizabeth Inchbald. Special attention to the new prominence of women in the drama of this period, changes in theater architecture, forms of non-dramatic spectacle, and the political and social significance of drama. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL #883 - English Novel of the 18th Century

Credits: 4

Study of the rise and development of the novel in the eighteenth century. Works by such figures as Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Charlotte Lennox, Laurence Sterne, Frances Burney, and Jane Austen. Focus on writers who published their work in England but with examples from the colonial world and the continent (in translation) when appropriate. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL 885 - Major Women Writers

Credits: 4

Intensive study of one or more women writers. Selections vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

ENGL 889 - Special Topics in English Teaching

Credits: 4

Advanced theories and practices course on English Teaching. Topics such as A) Teaching Young Adult Literature, C) Teaching English in Diverse Contexts, D) Teaching Drama, N) Teaching Nonfiction, R) Engish Teachers as Researchers, and T) Alternate Literacies and Teaching Technologies. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details see course descriptions available in the English department.

ENGL 890 - Special Topics in Linguistics

Credits: 4

An advanced course on a topic to be chosen by the instructor. Inquire at the English department office for a full course description each time the course is offered. Topics such as word formation, dialectology, linguistic theory and language acquisition, language and culture, cross-disciplinary studies relating to linguistics. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL 891 - English Grammar

Credits: 4

A survey of the grammar of English (pronunciation, vocabulary, sentence structure, punctuation, dialect variation, historical change) with special attention to the distinction between descriptive and prescriptive grammar and to the problems students have with formal expository writing.

ENGL 892 - Teaching Literature and Literacy

Credits: 4

This course introduces theories and practices of teaching literature and literacy, including teaching reading and writing as well as teaching literary analysis at the secondary level. Students also learn to plan lessons, choose texts, and create learning activities for speaking, listening, and viewing in grade five through twelve. The course is designed for students who are interested in teaching as a possible career.

ENGL 893 - Phonetics and Phonology

Credits: 4

The sounds and sound systems of English in the context of linguistic theory: comparisons of English to other languages. Prereq: a basic linguistic course or permission. (Not offered every year.)

ENGL 894 - Syntax

Credits: 4

The relationship of grammar and meaning as viewed from the standpoint of modern linguistic theory. Emphasis on the syntax and semantics of English, with special attention to the construction of arguments for or against particular analyses. (Also offered as ENGL/LING 794). Prereq: a basic linguistic course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 897 - Special Studies in Literature

Credits: 4

A) Old English Literature; B) Medieval Literature; C) 16th Century; D) 17th Century; E) 18th Century; F) English Romantic Period; G) Victorian Period; H) 20th Century; I) Drama; J) Novel; K) Poetry; L) Nonfiction; M) American Literature; N) A Literary Problem; O) Literature of the Renaissance. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English department.

ENGL 898 - Special Studies in Creative Writing

Credits: 4

Courses offered under this number focus on topics within creative writing, such as poetic influences, the short story form, and writing the novel. The precise topics and methods of each section vary. Barring duplication of subject, course may be repeated for credit. For details, see the course descriptions available in the English Department.

ENGL 899 - Master of Fine Arts in Writing Thesis

Credits: 1-8

Eight credits required, that can be taken in any combination during the student's academic coursework. Maximum of 8 credits. IA (Continuous grading). Cr/F.

ENGL 901 - Advanced Writing of Fiction

Credits: 4

Workshop discussion of advanced writing problems and readings of students' fiction. Individual conferences with instructor. Prereq: writing fiction or equivalent. Written permission of the instructor required for registration. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department chairperson.

ENGL 902 - Master Fiction Workshop

Credits: 4

A fiction workshop for third-year M.F.A. students to refine the drafts of their book-length M.F.A. thesis. Completion drafts will be workshopped and revised. Various directed readings. May be repeated for credit up to 8 hours. Special fee.

ENGL 903 - Advanced Memoir Writing

Credits: 4

Workshop of essays/chapters in memoir, and discussion of current models of the form. Individual conferences with instructor. Written permission of instructor required for registration. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department chairperson.

ENGL 910 - Practicum in Teaching College Composition

Credits: 6

Seminar focuses on composition practical and theortical issues of significance to the teaching writing to first-year students. A mentorship component creates opportunities for close supervision and support by experienced teachers in the writing program. Open only to teachers in the First-year Writing program.

ENGL 911 - Writing for Teachers

Credits: 4

Opportunity for teachers of composition to work intensively on their writing, to read as writers, and to discover the principles appropriate to the writing genre they are teaching. Because of its special focus, this course may not be applied to the M.A. in English/writing option. Topics may vary.

ENGL 912 - Historical and Theoretical Studies in Rhetoric

Credits: 4

The rhetorical tradition in Western culture, with a special focus on three critical periods: the classical period (Aristotle, Cicero, Quintillian), the eighteenth century (Blair and Campbell), and the modern era (Burke, Booth, Perelman, Ong, Weaver).

ENGL 913 - Theory and Practice of Composition

Credits: 4

Examination of major theoretical and pedagogical works in the field of composition. To include works on the writing process, writing development, response to writing, and other topics.

ENGL 914 - Special Topics in Composition and Rhetoric

Credits: 4

Topics chosen by instructor may include: A) Political, Philosophical, and Ethical Issues in Composition; B) Gender and Writing; C) Cognition and Composition; and D) Ethnographics of Literacy. May be repeated for credit, barring duplication of topic.

ENGL 916 - History of Composition

Credits: 4

Composition teaching and theory in American colleges and academics from the 18th century to the present.

ENGL 918 - Research Methods in Composition

Credits: 4

Overview of major research approaches including historical, case study, ethnographic, and textual; special emphasis on research design.

ENGL #919 - Teaching the Writing Process

Credits: 1-6

Focus both on the writing of the participants and on the teaching of writing in grades K-12. Special attention is given to strategies for prewriting, revision, evaluation, and conducting writing conferences. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits.

ENGL 920 - Issues in Teaching English and the Language Arts

Credits: 1-6

Special topics in the teaching of English and the language arts. Inquire at the English department to see what topics in the teaching of reading, writing, literature, or language arts may be scheduled. Open only to graduate students with a professional interest in teaching or to practicing teachers. 1-6 credits depending on the specific course.

ENGL 921 - Practicum in Teaching English and the Language Arts

Credits: 1-6

A site-based course for practicing teachers that features in-class observations and demonstrations, individual consultation, and group meetings in the schools. Prereq: permission. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits.

ENGL 922 - Advanced Topics in Literacy Instruction

Credits: 1-6

Specialized study of literacy topics that may include: A) Nature Journaling; B) Gender and Literacy; C) Digital Storytelling; D) Multigenre Writing; E) Assessment; F) Capstone Project; and G) Literacy Problem.

ENGL 923 - Advanced Essay Writing

Credits: 4

Writing and reading course in which students are encouraged to experiment with a variety of styles and forms. Discusses outside reading by focusing on techniques that the student might want to apply to his or her own material. Prereq: permission.

ENGL 924 - Professional Preparation

Credits: 2

This 2-credit course, offered in alternate years, is designed primarily to help doctoral students prepare to enter the profession. It takes up such topics as writing a resume or curriculum vitae, presenting a conference paper, submitting an article, applying for a job, and interviewing. Cr/F.

ENGL 925 - Graduate Study of Literature

Credits: 4

Techniques, resources, and purposes of literary study: close reading; practical criticism; critical theories and their values; pertinence of intellectual and historical backgrounds. Approaches applied to a specific area of literary study, which varies from year to year.

ENGL 926 - Seminar: Literary Theory

Credits: 4

Major questions and topics in the current theories about literature and contexts. What is literature? What method might one use to analyze literary texts? What role might cultural and social conditions play in our understanding of literature? How have traditional answers to these and other questions about literature been contested? May be repeated.

ENGL 927 - Seminar: Feminist Criticism Theory and Practice

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 932 - Seminar: Folklore and Folklife

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 935 - Seminar: Studies in American Literature

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 936 - Seminar: Literature of Early America

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 937 - Seminar: Studies in 19th Century American Literature

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 938 - Seminar: Studies in 20th Century American Literature

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 953 - Seminar: Studies in Old English

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 956 - Seminar: Studies in Medieval Literature

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 958 - Seminar: Studies in Shakespeare

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 959 - Seminar: Studies in Milton

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 960 - Seminar: Studies in English Drama

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 964 - Seminar: Studies in 16th Century Literature

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 965 - Seminar: Studies in Early 17th Century Literature

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 968 - Seminar: Studies in 18th Century Literature

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 970 - Seminar: Studies in the Romantic Period

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 971 - Seminar: Studies in the Victorian Period

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 974 - Seminar: Studies in 20th Century British Literature

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 981 - Seminar: Studies in Post-Colonial Literatures in English

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 990 - Seminar in Linguistics

Credits: 4

May be repeated.

ENGL 994 - Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Credits: 2-6

Students have an opportunity to observe and discuss ESL classes and to design and carry out their own lessons, with follow-up evaluation. Cr/F.

ENGL 995 - Independent Study

Credits: 1-8

To be elected only with permission of the director of graduate studies and of the supervising faculty member.

ENGL 996 - Reading and Research

Credits: 2-8

Cr/F.

ENGL 998 - Master's Paper

Credits: 4

Cr/F. IA (Continuous grading).

ENGL 999 - Doctoral Research

Credits: 0

Cr/F.