History (HIST)

http://www.unh.edu/history

Degrees Offered: Ph.D., M.A.

This program is offered in Durham.

Welcome to the History Department Graduate Program at the University of New Hampshire. We offer comprehensive programs for graduate students and a faculty who have won numerous prizes for teaching and scholarship. Our courses cover a wide range of times, places, and subjects, with a particular strength in cultural history, women's history, the history of religion, Atlantic history, and African American history. In addition, M.A. students can focus on Museum Studies.

The Department of History offers the master of arts and doctor of philosophy degrees. The master of arts is offered in many subfields. A formal option in museum studies is also available. Doctoral dissertations may be written on the history of the United States or on topics comparing the United States with other societies or areas.

Admission Requirements

The department usually requires evidence of substantial preparation in history at the undergraduate level, together with some preparation in other areas of humanities and social sciences.

Applicants for admission to any graduate program in history should have a minimum of a B average in history, allied humanities, and social sciences. In addition, applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The department assesses the student's entire application, including letters of recommendation and writing sample, in making its decision on admission. Deficiencies in an undergraduate program may be rectified by coursework as a special student, but such coursework cannot be used to satisfy requirements for an advanced degree. The department also recommends that a beginning graduate student have some training in a foreign language. Students in seminar or reading courses in other than American history may be required to have a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language appropriate to the particular course. Applicants should include with their applications a personal statement indicating their reason for undertaking graduate study at the University of New Hampshire. Normally, an entering student intending to be a candidate for the doctorate will complete an M.A. program as a prerequisite. However, students with the M.A. from another institution, or with exceptionally strong preparation at the undergraduate level, can begin the doctoral program immediately. In addition, a student in residence can, with the consent of the department, omit the M.A. and proceed directly toward the Ph.D.

History (HIST)

HIST 800 - Advanced Explorations

Credits: 1-4

Advanced explorations in one of the fields listed below: A) American History, B) European History, C) World History, D) Ancient History. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 802 - Holocaust: The War on Europe's Jews

Credits: 4

The attempted destruction of European Jewry during the Third Reich is one of the pivotal events in the history of modern Western Civilization. This course explores the circumstances and behavior of the Jews (as victims, resistors, survivors), the perpetrators (German and non-German), bystanders (German, European, and American), and rescuers (German and non-German). Attention is also given to such post-1945 matters as justice, compensation, and memory.

HIST 803 - European Conquest of North America

Credits: 4

European Conquest of America explores many of the major issues relating to the creation and development of colonial North America. We will focus particularly on the extraordinary heterogeneous mixture of peoples who lived in North America and the Caribbean, and on the complexity and consequences of their interactions. Throughout the semester we will continually evaluate arguments among historians about whether or not it makes sense to understand the colonial period in terms of a conquest, or whether Native Americans retained enough power and resistance throughout the colonial period to make such an interpretation inaccurate.

HIST #804 - History of Medicine in the United States

Credits: 4

Have you been a patient, a nurse, or a holder of insurance? Almost everyone in the United States has a role in health care. We study the growth and development of the field of American medicine from colonial times to the present, examining the changing relationships between patients, health care professionals, technology, government, and others. The focus will be shifts in responsibility and authority over time from patients, to doctors, and even to businesses.

HIST 805 - American Revolution, 1750-1800

Credits: 4

Examines the transformation of thirteen British colonies into the United States through the election of Thomas Jefferson as president in 1801. Topics include the revolution's origins, the social and political impact of war, the changing structure of the family, the role of religion, the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, and the revolution's consequences for Indians and African Americans.

HIST 806 - History of the Early Republic

Credits: 4

Explorations in the histories of people and institutions that transformed the new United States from a coastal republic of largely independent freeholders to a transcontinental democracy increasingly driven by class. Topics include slavery, the family, reform movements, and the formulations of national identity.

HIST 809 - United States Legal History Special Topics

Credits: 4

In-depth thematic exploration of the role of law in American life. Topics include Race and Equality in American Law; Community, Pluralism, and American Law; Property, Liberty, and Law; Gender and Law. May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission. Consult department listing for topics.

HIST 811 - Civil War Era

Credits: 4

A survey of the period from the presidency of Andrew Jackson to the end of the Reconstruction, focusing on the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include slavery in the Old South, antebellum reform movements, creation and breakdown of the Second Party System, social and economic (as well as military) events during the war, and major developments during Reconstruction after the war.

HIST 812 - Emergence of Industrial America

Credits: 4

Investigates the economic transformation of 19th-century America from a rural, agricultural to an urban, industrial society. Explores the sweeping economic changes, focusing on such topics as changes in work and leisure, westward expansion and its effects on Native Americans, shifts in gender roles, growth of a consumer culture, rise of labor unions and populism, immigration, movements for reform and regulation, growth of American imperialism, and intellectual developments.

HIST 813 - American Ways of War

Credits: 4

"Is there an American way of war?" This commonly asked question will be the focal point of the course. To answer that we will study the interactions of both war and society in the United States from the Civil War onwards, addressing such issues as the causes, courses, diplomacy, homefront, legacy, and the art of the great and small wars.

HIST 815 - The Rise of Modern United States, 1900-1945

Credits: 4

By 1900, the United States had emerged as the world's leading industrial power and leading destination for millions of immigrants and had begun to become a major player in world affairs. Americans enjoyed unprecedented prosperity and became eager consumers of new inventions and popular culture: cars, radios, jazz records, and the "motion pictures." But they also experienced the worst depression the country had ever known and struggled to make sense of a world that went to war twice within a generation. Women, African Americans, immigrants - all struggled to carve out their place in the new political order. By World War II, the United States assumed many of its "modern" characteristics. Using novels, movies, photographs, sporting events, political speeches and political debates, we will explore both the domestic and the international aspects of the development of modern U.S.

HIST 816 - United States Since World War II

Credits: 4

United States since 1941; cultural, political, and social factors causing major changes in American life.

HIST 818 - American Environmental History

Credits: 4

This course examines how nature has been a factor in American history and how Americans have wrestled with the concepts of nature and culture. Topics include industrialization, evolution, conservationism, environmentalism, and environmental diplomacy.

HIST 819 - Foreign Relations of the United States

Credits: 4

The history of American diplomacy from the colonial era to the present, with the dividing point at 1900. The focus will be on both the foreign and domestic influences that shaped American diplomacy.

HIST 820 - Foreign Relations of the United States

Credits: 4

The history of American diplomacy from the colonial era to the present, with the dividing point at 1900. The focus will be on both the foreign and domestic influences that shaped American diplomacy.

HIST 821 - History of American Thought

Credits: 4

This course introduces the subfields of American intellectual and cultural history by assessing the ideas of some of the brightest minds that thought about life on the land we know of as the United States of America before the middle of the nineteenth century. This course surveys more than two centuries of thinkers and their connection to America's plural and evolving popular culture. Utimately, this course seeks to answer the question: What is the history of American thought?.

HIST 822 - History of American Thought

Credits: 4

Influential thinkers and ideas have shaped American politics, society, economy, and culture since the Civil War. Among the topics explored are American Victorianism, Social Darwinism, Pragmatism, Modernism and its opponents, gender and identity politics and post modernism. Mark Twain, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Thorstein Veblen, W.E.B. Dubois, John Dewey, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Hannah Arendt, Thomas Kuhn, Malcolm X, Susan Sontag and William F. Buckley Jr. will be among the thinkers explored.

HIST 824 - Topics in Modern United States Social History

Credits: 4

Advanced study of topics in U.S. social history since the Age of Jackson. Topics will vary; and may include such examples as slavery and the antebellum South; reform movements in U.S. history; family history; labor history; the impact of war on American society; race in recent U.S. history. May be repeated as topics change.

HIST 825 - Southern History and Literature since the Civil War

Credits: 4

Equal focus on the history and literature of the South since the Civil War. Topics include reconstruction, the age of segregation, and the Civil Rights Movement. Literary focus is on the period since 1920, including the "Southern Renaissance"; authors include William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Flannery O'Connor, and Zora Neale Hurston.

HIST 832 - Topics in Latin American History

Credits: 4

Topics vary (see department listing for current semester). Seminar involves reading, discussion, and research on literature and documents related to the selected topic. It provides students with the opportunity to do research under close direction.

HIST 833 - Medieval England 800-1300

Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to gain an in-depth understanding of the history of medieval England from the beginning of the period of consolidation under the Wessex dynasty in the ninth-century through the end of the thirteenth century. In addition to obtaining a large corpus of information through the reading of significant monographs dealing with England during this period, students will be challenged to develop the critical analytical skills necessary for the thorough understanding and practice of historical methodologies, with a particular focus on the practice of historical method in writing medieval history. Finally, students will be given the opportunity to improve their communication skills through extensive class discussions dealing with the scholarly works read for this course, and in writing assignments.

HIST 834 - Medieval Empires

Credits: 4

This course will explore the intellectual and political foundations of imperial rule in the Middle Ages with a particular focus on the Carolingian, German, and Byzantine empires of the early and high Middles Ages. The course will begin with the development of the idea of empire under Alexander the Great and then during the Roman empire. The course will then turn to an examination of how the rulers of the three great empires of the western Middle Ages adapted the classical ideas and practices of empire for their purposes. The course focuses on sources. Background material will be provided in short lectures.

HIST 840 - Holy War in the Holy Land: The Medieval Crusades

Credits: 4

Survey of medieval military expeditions organized by Christians to secure the Holy Land during the 12th and 13th centuries. Topics considered include the formulation of a "just war" theory, political, intellectual, religious, and military interactions between Christians, Jews, and Muslims; the Crusader State of Jerusalem; and the histories of individual crusades.

HIST 841 - Europe After the Black Death

Credits: 4

Explores the dramatic changes that characterized Western Europe as it rebounded in the fifteenth through the seventeenth centuries from the ravages of the Black Death of 1348. Examines the social, political, and artistic developments in late medieval and Renaissance Italy before "crossing the Alps" to trace the expansion of Renaissance culture in Northern Europe. Topics covered in the course include the humanist movement, new patterns of social organization, the revival of classical antiquity in the arts, architecture, religion and political theory, the effects on European society of the encounter with the "New World," shifting roles for men and women in early modern European societies, and religious war and conflict.

HIST 842 - Saints, Sinners, and Heretics: Europe in the Age of Religious Reform

Credits: 4

Examines the history of Western Christendom from roughly 1400 to 1600, a period of tumultuous religious change throughout Europe. We begin in the Middle Ages where the seeds of religious division were sown. We then tackle Martin Luther's challenge to the Catholic church, trace the diffusion of his message throughout Europe, and address the Catholic response to the evangelizing movements that he inspired. Finally we investigate some of the regional varieties of Protestantism that developed in the latter half of the sixteenth century with a particular focus on Switzerland, Germany, England, Scotland, France, and the Netherlands.

HIST 844 - Victorian Britain

Credits: 4

The Victorian Era was a time of contrasts. Queen Victoria, a monarch known for her moral strictness, sexual probity and rigid sense of decorum ruled over a vast world Empire. The streets of London, however, teemed with prostitutes, pickpockets and impoverished immigrants from Ireland, Europe and beyond, whose lives seemed untouched by either the prosperity or moral stringency that characterized the age. In this class we explore the varieties of Victorian experience both at home and in the global empire. We will examine the glittering lives of the rich as well as the abject poverty of the working poor and explore our own fascination with the dress, the homes, and the lives of the Victorians. Examining sources such as novels, decorative arts, corsets & bustles, Parliamentary debates, architecture, and scientific writings, we will attempt to uncover the many-faceted culture, society and political life of Victorian Britain.

HIST 845 - 19th Century European Great Powers - Diplomacy and International Law

Credits: 4

In this course, we will study power in Europe during the apogee of that region's strength. The long nineteenth century is a period during which Europe avoided major continent-wide (and world-wide) wars, despite constant upheavals. That is a remarkable accomplishment when one compares the events of the nineteenth century with those of the twentieth, despite the fact that the former influenced the latter. Focus is on those who wielded power internationally, including dealmakers, deal-breakers, manipulators, and idealists. To express, test, restrain, or leverage power, actors engaged in wars and negotiations that led to a range of contracts from treaties, such as the Treaty of Fontainebleau ending Napoleon's reign; to alliances, like the Anglo-Japanese Naval Alliance ending Britain's "splendid isolation" from international partnerships; to conferences, including the Hague Conventions regulating wars. In addition, it is important to look at statutes influencing foreign policy, as did the Second German Naval Law of 1900 which increased European tensions before World War I. Examining the relations of powerful nineteenth century states, therefore, illuminates international law as well as more traditional elements of diplomacy. Students learn about 19th century great powers of Europe and important pieces of international legal relationships as well as develop critical thinking and communication skills.

HIST 849 - Comparative Topics in the History of Early Modern Europe

Credits: 4

Topics will vary, but may include enlightenment and revolution; the peasantry; gender and the family; crime and deviance; science and society. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

HIST 851 - Topics in European Intellectual History

Credits: 4

Explores major developments such as the Enlightenment, Russian intellectual history, ancient world views and cosmologies, and the relationship between gender and intellectual history. Includes topics up to the Scientific Revolution. Because topics may vary, students should check the department newsletter or office for course theme in any given term. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

HIST 852 - Topics in European Intellectual History

Credits: 4

Explores major developments such as the Enlightenment, Russian intellectual history, ancient world views and cosmologies, and the relationship between gender and intellectual history. Includes topics since the Renaissance. Because topics vary, students should check the department newsletter or office for course themes in any given term. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

HIST 854 - Topics in History of Science

Credits: 4

Study of a selected topic in the history of European science since the Renaissance.

HIST 856 - 20th Century Europe

Credits: 4

Advanced study of 20th-century Europe. World War I, European totalitarianism, World War II, the loss of European primacy, and the search for a new Europe.

HIST 862 - England in the Tudor and Stuart Periods

Credits: 4

Advanced study of England during the Tudor and Stuart periods. Political, religious, socioeconomic, and intellectual forces for change at work in England from the accession of Henry VII to the revolution of 1688-89.

HIST 864 - Russia: Modernization through Soviet Empire

Credits: 4

The challenges of modernization; experience and legacy of Leninist and Stalinist revolutions; Soviet consolidation and decline through the Gorbachev era.

HIST 865 - Themes in Women's History

Credits: 4

In-depth examination of a selected topic in women's history, such as women and health, women in modern European political theory, comparative history of women and revolution. See "Time and Room Schedule" or department for specific topic. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

HIST #866 - Environmental History of Northwest Atlantic Commercial Fisheries

Credits: 4

After centuries of ground-fishing humans have radically transformed the northwest Atlantic marine ecosystem, creating a tragedy for both fish and fisherman. This marine environmental history course considers the changing technology, ecology, and sociology of the commercial fishery off New England and the Canadian maritime from 1500 to the present.

HIST 869 - Germany from 1918 to Present

Credits: 4

Begins with the revolution of 1918 and then explores the political, social, and intellectual character of the Weimar Republic, the rise and nature of Nazism, the Holocaust, the foundation of both the German Democratic Republic and Federal Republic and their evolution in the shadow of the Cold War, and concludes with the unification of Germany after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

HIST 871 - Museum Studies

Credits: 4

Introduction to theory, methods, and practice of museum studies. Examination of various museum functions, as well as historical controversies. Prereq: graduate students only.

HIST 872 - Studies in Regional Material Culture

Credits: 4

An introduction to the theory and methodology of material culture, that is, the study of history through the analysis of buildings, human-created landscapes, and artifacts made and used in the United States, particularly in New England. May be repeated for credit with the permission of the graduate director.

HIST 873 - Early History of Ancient Greece

Credits: 4

Greek history from the Minoan and Mycenaean eras through the Persian Wars of the early fifth century. Emphasis on original sources including the Homeric epics, Plutarch, Sappho, and Herodotus. Examination of the distinctive developments of political systems in Sparta, Athens, as well as issues of colonization, diplomacy, religion, and culture. Through discussion of types of available evidence and their integration into historical understanding.

HIST 874 - Historiography

Credits: 4

Analysis of ancient and modern historians. (Not offered every year.)

HIST 875 - Historical Methods

Credits: 4

Introduction to contemporary historical methods. Required of all entering Ph.D. candidates; open to undergraduates with permission.

HIST 876 - Classical and Hellenistic Greek Worlds

Credits: 4

Greek History from the Persian Wars of the early fifth century through the life of Alexander the Great and the creation of the Hellenistic world. Emphasis on original sources including Herodotus, Thucydides, the Athenian playwrights, and Plato. Examination of the transformation from city-state political organization to large Hellenistic kingdoms, as well as discussion of Greek historiography, intellectual life, and social theory. Thorough discussion of types of available evidence and their integration into historical understanding.

HIST 877 - Roman Republic

Credits: 4

Covers pre-Roman Italy, the Etruscans, and the foundation of the Republic. Rome's expansion through the Punic Wars, and relations with the Hellenistic kingdoms. Disintegration and final collapse of the Republic. Includes discussion of Roman art, engineering, and political theory. Emphasis on Latin sources in philosophy, history, and literature.

HIST 878 - Roman Empire

Credits: 4

Collapse of the Roman Republic and creation of the Augustan principate through the division of the empire, with discussion of the fall of Rome in the west, and the eastern empire through Justinian. Discussion of Roman art, literature, philosophy, religious developments such as the proliferation of mystery religions and the rise of Christianity.

HIST 879 - Workshop in History and Historical Methods

Credits: 1-6

Workshop for teachers in History. Intensive work designed to introduce teachers to advanced current work in history. Topics vary. May be repeated with permission of the instructor or the graduate director in the history department.

HIST 880 - Special Topics in Museum Studies/Material Culture

Credits: 4

Study of a selected topic related to museum studies or material culture. May be repeated for course credit with permission of the graduate director.

HIST 881 - Society and Culture in 20th-Century China

Credits: 4

Explores major aspects of social and cultural transformation in China from the beginning of the century, when the Qing dynasty was replaced by a Republic, to the age of globalization. Themes included the rise of citizenship and civic activism, mass culture in print media, commercial culture in advertisement and consumerism, European and Russian influences on cultural and political changes, war of resistance, refugee and social dislocation, rural transformation shaped by socialism and global market.

HIST #884 - History of Southern Africa since 1652

Credits: 4

Struggle for political and economic control in the only region of Africa where European groups remain in power. Impact of European imperialism, European nationalism, racial conflict, economic competition and industrialization, apartheid, and assimilation with special attention to the development of European hegemony.

HIST 890 - Seminar: Historical Expl

Credits: 4

Seminar in one of the fields listed below: A) American History, B) Atlantic History, C) Canadian History, D) Latin American History, E) Medieval History, F) History, G) History of Islam, H) Ancient History, I) East Asian History, J) African History, K) Middle Eastern History, L) Historiography, M) Russian History, N) World History, O) British History, P) New Hampshire History, Q) Historical Methodology, R) Irish History, S) History of Science, T) Maritime History, U) Museum. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits.

HIST 892 - Seminar in the History of Science

Credits: 4

In-depth examination of a selected topic in the history of science. Subjects vary. No special background in science required.

HIST 897 - Colloquium

Credits: 4

Selected topics in American, European, and non-Western history. Required of history majors. Students must elect section in the department office at the time of registration. Prereq: Intro to Historical Thinking.

HIST 898 - Internship in Museum Studies

Credits: 4

Supervised position with a museum, historical society, archive, or other history related site. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits. Prereq: permission. Credit/Fail.

HIST 899 - Master's Thesis

Credits: 1-6

May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. Permission required. Cr/F.

HIST 939 - Readings in Early American History

Credits: 3

Introduces the chief themes and issues in the secondary literature of early American history from European settlement through the Early Republic. Students write a series of short analytical papers. Expected of all graduate students preparing a field in Early America. Permission required for those not enrolled in History Graduate Program.

HIST 940 - Readings in Modern American History

Credits: 3

An introduction to major historians and historiographical issues in the history of the U.S. since 1820. Intended to serve as a foundation for research in the field and as preparation for graduate examinations. Permission required for those not enrolled in History Graduate Program.

HIST 949 - Colloquium in United States History

Credits: 3

Topics include 1) Early American Society; 2) Early American Culture; 3) Revolutionary Period; 4) 19th Century; 5) 20th Century. Focuses on existing historical literature on a given topic, such as American slavery. Students normally read extensively, discuss major issues and the literature in class meetings, and write essays that examine the literature critically.

HIST 951 - Colloquium in European History

Credits: 3

Topics include 1) Medieval; 2) Early Modern; and 3) Modern. The course focuses on the existing historical literature on a given topic, such as the French Revolution. Students normally read extensively, discuss major issues and the literature in class meetings, and write essays that examine the literature critically. May be repeated if a different topic is selected.

HIST 952 - Colloquium in Comparative History

Credits: 3

Intensive reading in comparative studies of U.S. history. Compares the experience of the United States and that of some other area or nation. For example, comparing legal history of Britain and the U.S.; the impact of colonization on native peoples in North and South America; the nature of slavery in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Brazil; or the experience of women in Europe and America. Topics vary and may be repeated with permission.

HIST 953 - Colloquium in African, Asian, Latin American History

Credits: 3

Topics include 1) African; 2) Asian; 3) Latin American; 4) Middle Eastern. Focuses on the existing scholarly historical literature on a given topic, such as nationalism or slavery. Students normally read extensively, discuss major issues and the literature in class meetings, and write essays that examine the literature critically.

HIST 970 - Graduate Seminar in Teaching History

Credits: 1

Introduction of fundamental issues in the teaching of history at the college level. Topics include basic pedagogical issues, such as leading effective discussions, evaluating students' work, and lesson planning, and also concerns related to history teaching, e.g., developing students' historical consciousness, use of media, and so forth. Required of all entering Ph.D. students and applicable to the Cognate in College Teaching. Course to be taken in the Fall and then repeated in Spring for a total of two credits. (Also offered as GRAD 981.) Cr/F.

HIST 989 - Research Seminar in Early American History

Credits: 3

1) Early American Society; 2) Early American Culture; 3) Revolutionary Period; 4) 19th Century; 5) 20th Century. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 990 - Research Seminar in Modern American History

Credits: 3

Students write a lengthy research paper in any aspect of early US history, to 1877. The course also includes professional preparation assignments. May be repeated with a different topic. Permission required for those not enrolled in History Graduate Progam.

HIST 991 - Research Seminar in European History

Credits: 3

1) Medieval; 2) Early Modern; 3) Modern. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 992 - Research Seminar in Comparative History

Credits: 3

Comparative studies of U.S. history, emphasizing primary research. Colloquium compares the experience of the United States and that of some other area or nation. For example, comparing the legal histories of Britain and the U.S.; the impact of colonization on native peoples in North and South America; the nature of slavery in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Brazil, or the experiences of women in Europe and America. Topics vary, and the course may be repeated for credit.

HIST 993 - Research Seminar in African, Asian, Latin American History

Credits: 3

1) African; 2) Asian; 3) Latin American; 4) Middle East. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 994 - Research Seminar in African, Asian, Latin American History

Credits: 3

1) African; 2) Asian; 3) Latin American; 4) Middle East. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 995 - Tutorial Reading and Research

Credits: 1-6

A) Early American History; B) American National History; C) Canada; D) Latin America; E) Medieval History; F) Early Modern Europe; G) Modern European History; H) Ancient History; I) Far East and India; J) Near East and Africa; K) European Historiography; L) American Historiography; M) Russia; N) World History; O) English History; P) New Hampshire History; Q) Historical Methodology; R) Irish History; S) History of Science; T) Maritime; U) Museum Studies. May be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: permission.

HIST 997 - Directed Readings in Early American History

Credits: 1-6

Directed readings in Early American History. Supervised readings for students preparing for the Ph.D. examinations in Early American History. Cr/F. Permission required.

HIST 998 - Directed Readings in Modern United States History

Credits: 1-6

Supervised readings for students preparing for Ph.D. examinations in Modern U.S. History. Cr/F.

HIST 999 - Doctoral Research

Credits: 0

Cr/F.