Education (Educator Preparation Programs)

Education programs present opportunities for both current and potential educators at every level. Ideal for teachers who wish to further their education as their career progresses, these programs are designed to serve the evolving needs of today’s educators.

Education (EDC)

EDC 500 - Foundations of Education

Credits: 4

This course is the introductory course to the education programs. The purpose is to examine the theoretical foundations of education in the United States. Historical, political, and social influences on the development of the education system are examined. Students develop their own educational philosophy and compare it to the philosophies which have shaped American education. A twenty-hour practicum is required.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): EDU 510G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Describe college program requirements, practicum requirements, and portfolio requirements.
  2. Identify major theorists such as Rousseau, Dewey, Hutchins, Mann, Green, Rogers and explain their perspectives on education and learning.
  3. Describe the evolution of professional roles and responsibilities in the U.S. education system from colonial days to the present.
  4. Using historical approaches as a foundation, explain how education evolves to meet the changing needs of society.
  5. Identify and explain how social, economic, and political historical factors have shaped current education structures and practices.
  6. Explain how schools are complex organizations within a larger community.
  7. Based on theoretical perspectives, describe how school organizational units (e.g., preschool, elementary, middle school, junior high, K-8, high school, and K-12) serve their populations.
  8. Analyze a school's mission statement in light of education philosophies.
  9. Evaluate theoretical and historical perspectives in the construction of a personal philosophy and approach to education.
  10. Participate in an early field experience that provides opportunities for observing, teaching,and engaging with school age youth.

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EDC 501 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of the early childhood profession and how these roots influence current practice. Students examine and write about the issues facing children, families, early childhood programs, and professionals. A variety of educational theories and models are reviewed with regard to how effectively they address the needs of children, parents, and communities. Students establish their own sense of professionalism with connections to the literature, organizations, and resources in the field and by writing their personal philosophies of early childhood education.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 550G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Trace the history of early childhood education and identify leaders and how they have influenced contemporary practices.
  2. Explain and compare the contributions of major theorists and practitioners who have contributed to the field of early childhood education (e.g., Pestalozzi, Froebel, Montessori, Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, and Gardner).
  3. Compare and contrast the educational models of various programs including High/Scope, Montessori, Bereiter-Engelmann, Head Start, Bank Street, Reggio Emilia, and Waldorf.
  4. Differentiate between programs such as nursery school, kindergarten, pre-school programs, and child care in terms of their funding, staffing, training, and regulations.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, with stakeholders (families, children, and/or co-workers) about the policies, procedures, and best practices in early childhood education.

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EDC 502 - Creative Arts in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 4

This course provides a hands-on approach to facilitating the creative development of children. Students explore their own creativity through a variety of media, including art, music, drama, and creative movement. The focus is on the creative process rather than products. Topics include definitions of creativity, how it affects domains of development, and ways it enhances learning. Students apply knowledge of developmentally appropriate practices and integrate them with creative experiences into a well-rounded curriculum that incorporates a variety of learning styles.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 553G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Describe the nature of creativity and its role in social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development.
  2. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the basic skills and content of each art form (art, music, creative movement, and drama) while exploring his/her own creativity.
  3. Design developmentally appropriate arts experiences for children from infancy through age eight using a variety of arts materials.
  4. Develop and evaluate integrated curriculum units which incorporate the arts as an essential strategy for promoting learning in the academic disciplines (language arts, science, math, social studies).
  5. Analyze the organization of the environment in term of how effectively it provides for each art domain (individual child choice, special needs, and appropriate display of children's work).
  6. Assess children's development by analyzing samples of creative work and formulate appropriate responses.
  7. Develop and modify activities in the arts to accommodate young children with special needs in an inclusive setting, and promote comfortable, empathetic, and just interaction with diversity.
  8. Critically reflect on best practices in utilizing creative arts to foster children's development.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, with stakeholders (families, children, and/or co-workers) about the policies, procedures, and best practices in early childhood education.

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EDC 503 - Language and Literacy Development

Credits: 4

This course provides in-depth study of the development of children's language and communication skills from birth through age eight. Students identify the various developmental levels exhibited by children, and choose and create diverse materials to enhance language and literacy development. The course focuses on analyzing and creating language-rich programs designed to foster listening, oral and written language, and pre-reading and reading skills at the appropriate developmental level. Students formulate developmentally appropriate questions and responses to enrich the child's experience. The course addresses how everyday experiences can present opportunities for creating meaningful communication between children, their peers, and adults.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 525 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 509G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 555G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Describe the importance of language and literacy skills to children's success in school and society.
  2. Distinguish quality print-rich environments in which children can work and play. Apply principles of development in designing and implementing activities and curricula that promote language and literacy development.
  3. Evaluate materials to enhance the language and literacy experiences of children from infancy through age eight.
  4. Articulate the components of developmentally appropriate literacy events inclusive of children with special needs and diverse backgrounds.
  5. Explain strategies for encouraging children to experiment with emergent forms of reading and writing.
  6. Compare and contrast opportunities for children to use language and literacy for authentic purposes in school, home, and the community.
  7. Use authentic forms of assessment to identify progress in language and literacy skill
  8. Respect and accommodate children's developmental, cultural, and linguistic diversity.
  9. Critically reflect on best practices in promoting language and literacy development in children.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, with stakeholders (families, children, and/or co-workers) about the policies, procedures, and best practices in early childhood education.

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EDC 504 - Health, Safety & Nutrition in Early Childhood Settings

Credits: 4

This course provides a comprehensive overview of health, safety and nutrition best practices in early care and education group settings. How best to promote the physical, mental, and emotional health of each child will be explored. State regulations, program procedures, and curriculum integration will be the focus of the course.

Equivalent(s): EDU 556G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Gain an understanding of the NH Child Care licensing health and safety regulations and how to apply them in a group setting.
  2. Gain an understanding of how environments play a role in the health and safety of children in their care.
  3. Gain a basic understanding of common early childhood illnesses and infections and how to best manage those in a group care setting.
  4. Gain a basic understanding of children's nutritional and physical activity needs and how to support those needs in the classroom practices and curriculum.
  5. Gain an understanding of emergency preparedness and their role in planning and implementation.
  6. Gain an understanding of how to recognize child abuse and neglect and their role as a mandatory reporter.
  7. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, with stakeholders (families, children, and/or co-workers) about the policies, procedures, and best practices in early childhood education.

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EDC 505 - Mathematics and Science in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 4

The course focuses on the cognitive development of children birth to age eight with emphasis upon the development and interrelatedness of math and science concepts. Using a hands-on approach, students explore the various materials used in learning centers to stimulate and develop children's logico-mathematical thinking. Students identify the various developmental levels of children's thinking and create developmentally appropriate materials and settings. The course emphasizes the application of developmental principles to investigate and devise experiences which employ mathematical reasoning and scientific processes.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 600G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Identify and explain the stages of children's cognitive development, using multiple theoretical perspectives.
  2. Apply the constructivist approach to explain and provide examples of how children develop mathematical and scientific thinking.
  3. Describe the setting and materials appropriate to providing children with opportunities to expand mathematical and scientific understanding in the classroom and at home.
  4. Apply their understanding of developmentally appropriate practice in planning curriculum that promotes logico-mathematical thinking in children through age 8 and accommodates children with special needs and diverse backgrounds.
  5. Evaluate the effectiveness of various commercially developed math and science materials (including technology) for preschool and primary classrooms.
  6. Apply principles of the Project Approach which integrate all aspects of curriculum based upon children's interests.
  7. Analyze children's books and teacher resources for their use in developing scientific and mathematical thinking.
  8. Critically reflect on best practices in facilitating scientific and mathematical thinking in children.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, with stakeholders (families, children, and/or co-workers) about the policies, procedures, and best practices in early childhood education.

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EDC 506 - Young Children with Exceptionalities in Early Childhood Settings

Credits: 4

This course focuses on promoting the optimal development of young children with special needs in an inclusionary early childhood setting. Building on a foundation of child development and the components of high-quality early childhood programs, students investigate specific physical, emotional, and psychological conditions which delay or modify the course of a child's healthy development. Students observe children with special needs in order to design adaptations in the curriculum and environment. Students develop strategies for collaborating with families and community services providers, based on a knowledge of legislative mandates regarding special education.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 602G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Describe the etiology, characteristics, and classification of specific disabilities and identify risk factors associated with specific disabilities.
  2. Describe key components of federal and state legislation, referral procedures, and the special education process.
  3. Explain the role of screening children for potential disabilities in making appropriate referrals.
  4. Apply knowledge of specific disabilities to appropriately adapt the early childhood curriculum and environment in order to meet the needs of all children.
  5. Select assessment tools and procedures used to identify special needs, and demonstrate the ability to use evaluation data to design intervention strategies that integrate the goals and objectives of IEPs and IFSPs.
  6. Justify and implement observation techniques that lead to effective reporting.
  7. Assess familial priorities and concerns and select appropriate resources as potential supports.
  8. Participate, under supervision, as a member of an early childhood intervention team.
  9. Critically reflect on best practices for children with disabilities through written assignments.
  10. Communicate with stakeholders effectively (both in writing and verbally) about the policies, procedures, and best practices of early childhood education.

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EDC 507 - Early Childhood Program Administration

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the various policies, procedures, and leadership practices that relate to the administration of quality early childhood programs. Topics include program development, budgeting and financial management, organizational structures, and staffing and supervision. The role of directors as leaders is explored. This course is designed for early childhood administrators, as well as for those aspiring to be directors. Prior completion of EDC 713 Family and Community Relations in ECE and EDC 602 Learning and Early Childhood Environments is recommended.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 501 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 550G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 605G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Discuss the standards of quality as they relate to licensing, accreditation, and credentialing.
  2. Explain the relationship between their philosophy of quality early care and education and program development and evaluation.
  3. Create a budget based on philosophy, meeting standards of quality, and equitable compensation for staff.
  4. Outline the components for effective family involvement including policies for payment, child health care, emergencies, and communication.
  5. Construct a comprehensive framework for effective personnel including creating job descriptions, hiring practices, performance review, employment policies, and professional development plans.
  6. Describe leadership styles of early childhood directors and the impact on effective management and supervision.
  7. Critically reflect on best practices in effective early childhood program administration through written assignments and through selection of work samples for their professional portfolios if it is appropriate for their major.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, with stakeholders (families, children, and/or co-workers) about the policies, procedures, and best practices in early childhood education.

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EDC 508 - Enhancing Supervision through Mentoring

Credits: 4

In this course early childhood educators who are primary supervisors of teachers or assistant teachers explore the various dimensions of their role. Based on concepts of adult development and the stages of teacher development, participants learn how to establish mentoring relationships and balance supervisory responsibilities as they gain skills to guide new employees, set goals, provide feedback on performance, resolve conflicts, and create positive working environments.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): EDU 604G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Explain the concept of mentoring and describe the qualities of a good mentor.
  2. Identify alternative mentoring models and their value in developing professionals.
  3. Analyze how the role of supervisor contrasts with the role of mentor.
  4. Evaluate strategies for combining and complementing effective techniques for both mentoring and supervising employees.
  5. Describe selected theories of adult development and analyze the implications of individual development for training, on-the-job learning, and formal education.
  6. Integrate principles of culturally relevant anti-bias curriculum and identify potential prejudices that might interfere with appropriate practice.
  7. Apply knowledge of stages of teacher development to interactions, goal setting, and feedback with employees.
  8. Demonstrate awareness of the dynamics of roles within the workplace and skills needed to build trusting, supportive, long-term relationships with employees.
  9. Employ effective communication skills including observation and feedback on employee performance, modeling and processing employee observations, the use of self-assessment, conferencing and conflict resolution.
  10. Reflect on their own practice in teaching, supervising and mentoring to improve performance based on critical evaluation.
  11. Demonstrate reflective learning skills and professional growth by selecting a completed assignment and submitting a written reflection for their portfolio as a culminating experience if appropriate for their major.

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EDC 544 - Special Topics: Lower Level

Credits: 1-4

A study of current and variable topics in Education. Course content changes from term to term.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): EDU 544G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

EDC 601 - Positive Behavior Guidance in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of children's social and emotional development and an exploration of factors that influence behavior. Topics include the impact of differing development, external factors, relationships, and stress and trauma on child development. Participants will analyze children's behavior in a variety of situations and reflect on how children respond to stimuli. The role of adults in affecting positive development will be explored. Evidence based strategies and techniques for guiding positive behavior will be applied.

Equivalent(s): EDU 560G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Describe typical child development for the Domain of Social and Emotional Development referencing the NH Early Learning Guidelines.
  2. Identify external factors that affect behavior in young children including cultural differences, family circumstances, environmental design, scheduling, and interpersonal interactions.
  3. Explain the effects of Temperament Traits and Temperament Types in the social and emotional growth of young children.
  4. Explain and compare current policy on school suspension and expulsions at the state and national levels.
  5. Apply the Pyramid Model for Promoting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and young children and the DEC Recommended Practices in Child Engagement in working with children.
  6. Identify and apply behavioral guidance strategies to support young children with challenging behaviors using a Protocol for Resolving Challenging Behaviors in a classroom setting.
  7. Evaluate the impact of stress and trauma on children's development and describe aspects and strategies of trauma informed care and services that can be applied in early childhood settings.
  8. Analyze and evaluate situations where consultation, assessment, and referral may be recommended. 09.Critically reflect on best practices in effective support of children's social and emotional growth and positive behavior guidance through self assessment of competencies and written assignments.

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EDC 602 - Learning and Early Childhood Environments

Credits: 4

This course addresses how to optimize children's learning through play and daily routines. Using theories of child development, participants analyze how the physical arrangement of the classroom and outdoor area can maximize development. Students plan an environment that meets safety and health needs, that allows for child directed choices and activities, and supports the child's physical, cognitive, language, social, and creative growth. Students apply practices to environments that are both developmentally and culturally inclusive.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 551G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Explain the central role of play as a vehicle to children's learning.
  2. Compare and contrast the elements required to successfully plan indoor and outdoor environments for children from infancy through age eight.
  3. Design developmentally and culturally appropriate environments which are inclusive for all children from birth through eight years.
  4. Evaluate existing environments according to nationally recognized standards of developmentally appropriate practice.
  5. Identify materials and resources and explain how their use in early childhood settings fosters physical, cognitive, language, creative, and social development.

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EDC 644 - Special Topics: Upper Level

Credits: 4

A study of current and variable topics in Education. Course content changes from term to term.

Equivalent(s): EDU 644G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

EDC 700 - Introduction to Field Experience

Credits: 1

This course is required for all students enrolled in teaching certification programs. Students develop prerequisite skills in lesson planning, assessment creation, data collection, and the formative assessment cycle as they gain the technical and professional understandings required for successful completion of teacher certification programs.

Equivalent(s): EDU 622G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Identify evidence based pedagogical practices implemented by high-quality educators.
  2. Review and analyze lesson plan criteria to identify and define the components of a successful lesson plan.
  3. Critique lesson objectives for specificity, measurability, and alignment.
  4. Evaluate lesson plans, pedagogy, and assessments using several quality measures.
  5. Justify a self-assessment of professional dispositions of educators.
  6. Reflect on personal growth in the areas of lesson planning, formative assessment, and pedagogical effectiveness.

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EDC 701 - Special Education Law

Credits: 4

The current field of special education was established by law and further refined through the courts in litigation. In this writing intensive class, students trace the historical development of federal, state, and local laws and regulations such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the New Hampshire Standards for the Education of Students with Disabilities. Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between constitutional law, statutory law, regulatory law, and case law as it relates to current special education law. The focus on policies and procedures provides the background future teachers and paraprofessionals need to fulfill their legal and ethical responsibilities and to understand the ever changing, complex nature of special education law.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): EDU 621G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Examine and analyze federal law, state law, and administrative rules pertaining to students with disabilities for required assessments and qualified examiners by disability type for the evaluation of students with disabilities as part of assessment related to the special education process.
  2. Summarize and discuss the key procedures and timelines for the referral, evaluations, and determination of eligibility for special education and related services.
  3. Interpret the rights and responsibilities of schools, students, families, teachers, and other professionals related to the identification, placement, and service of students with disabilities in accordance with the New Hampshire Procedural Safeguards.
  4. Explain the concept of the least restrictive environment and the continuum of educational environments.
  5. Examine and discuss the manifestation determination process and significant case law involving behavior.
  6. Research and summarize the continuum of approaches to dispute resolution in special education.

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EDC 702 - Young Children with Exceptionalities, Birth to Age 8

Credits: 4

In this course, students examine typical and non-typical development of children from birth through age 8. This is a time of rapid brain growth and overall development that forms the foundation for all learning. For young children who have exceptionalities in the physical, behavioral, developmental, or learning domains, these years are even more critical. The purpose of this course is to provide current, research-based knowledge and resources for professionals and their families who nurture, support, and provide services to exceptional children.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Research, describe, and compare typical and non-typical development of children, birth through age eight.
  2. Examine Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part C (ages 0-through age 2) B and Part B (ages 3 to 21) and delineate the implications for the education of children with disabilities, birth through age eight.
  3. Research and evaluate the history of special education in the United States, changing views of disability, and the planning and delivery of special education services with an emphasis on inclusion.
  4. Analyze and evaluate the significant issues in the education of linguistically and culturally diverse students and students who are gifted.
  5. Categorize and synthesize the research on the manifestations, origins, and teaching implications for the following: a. motor development b. medically-related problems c. adaptive behavior and self-help skills d. social and emotional development e. communication and language development f. cognitive development
  6. Describe and evaluate the assessment tools used to identify the disabilities listed above.
  7. Reflect on best practices for children with disabilities through written assignments and through selection of work samples for their professional portfolio.

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EDC 703 - The Dynamic Role of the Special Educator

Credits: 4

In this clinical course, students will examine the multifaceted role of the special education teacher as evaluator, consultant, case manager, and teacher. Courses taken throughout the teacher certification program support the development of skills for each of these roles. This is an introductory course designed to accomplish the following outcomes: (a) explore the college's digital library; (b) introduce the American Psychological Association annotation and format requirements; (c) provide a beginning teacher with an organizational framework for the varying roles of a special education teacher; (d) provide an in-depth understanding of their case management responsibilities; e) plan for the effective supervision of paraeducators; f) introduce the reflective analysis of student work teaching and assessment cycle; and g) apply the components of systematic direct instruction in lesson plan development.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 606G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

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  1. Explore the college's digital library.
  2. Introduce the American Psychological Association annotation and format requirements.
  3. Provide a beginning teacher with an organizational framework for the varying roles of a special education teacher.
  4. Provide an in-depth understanding of their case management responsibilities.

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EDC 704 - Assessment of Young Children in Early Childhood and Early Childhood Spec. Education, Birth to Age 8

Credits: 4

In this course, students use procedures involved in the evaluation process for determination of eligibility for special education. Students develop the skills necessary to administer and interpret assessment tools commonly used by early intervention staff and early childhood special education teachers. Under the supervision of the district mentor, students review early support and services records and/or school records, gather information, observe an evaluation team meeting, consult with district evaluators, and review a variety of assessment tools and evaluation reports for young children through age eight. Students participate in preparing an assessment plan, administering chosen assessment tools, and writing assessment reports. Emphasis is placed on working with team members in the evaluation process.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 624G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Reflect upon the legal and ethical responsibilities of a special education teacher.
  2. Discuss with a qualified examiner the assessment tools typically used in their district to measure intelligence, communication skills, and other skills.
  3. Administer and interpret a classroom observation, an early learning profile/scale, criterion-referenced test, a functional behavior assessment, an assessment portfolio, an adaptive behavior assessment, and a comprehensive standardized achievement battery if relevant.
  4. Write two formal comprehensive assessment reports (one for preschool aged child and one for child in K, first, second, or third grade) on selected children for case studies, analyzing and integrating an array of evaluative information including school records, academic performance indicators, classroom observation, and standardized test results if appropriate.
  5. Enter artifacts into the portfolio demonstrating attained skills.
  6. Use technology to tally and graph assessment results.

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EDC 705 - Collaboration, Consultation and Teaming In Early Childhood & Early Childhood Special Education

Credits: 4

In this course, students research and evaluate family, community, and professional partnerships which support the growth and development of children with disabilities. The specific roles and responsibilities of each contributing partner will be explored and analyzed. Students, using knowledge acquired in areas of collaboration, consultation, and teaming, construct service delivery models to support young children with diverse needs and their families. Fifty to sixty supervised clinical hours are required.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 627G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Explore the roles and responsibilities of early care and education professionals and families of young children with exceptionalities.
  2. Identify and evaluate models which support the collaborative efforts of early care and education professionals and families of young children with exceptionalities.
  3. Identify roles and responsibilities of early care and education professionals and families in the special education process.
  4. Develop, implement, and evaluate a model for collaboration to support the development and learning of young children with exceptionalities.
  5. Become familiar with early care and education models and analyze models of collaboration, consultation, and teaming with programs and providers, community partners, and families.
  6. Select an assignment and critically reflect on best practice in collaborative partnerships to add to their professional portfolio.
  7. Enter artifacts into the TaskStream e-portfolio demonstrating attained skills.
  8. Understand collaboration, consultation, and teaming in ECE through forty-nine hours of clinical observation.

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EDC 706 - IFSPs, IEPs, and Transition Planning - Birth to Age 8

Credits: 2

This clinical course focuses on the components and processes involved in the legal aspects and development of Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSPs) and Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). Under the supervision of a district mentor, students review school records; observe IFSP/IEP team meetings; consult with district evaluators, students, and parents; analyze previously written IFSPs/IEPs and progress reports; and develop the skills necessary to prepare IFSPs/IEPs inclusive of transition plans and/or services. The culminating activities of the course include the development of an IFSP an IEP, and a research paper which addresses the legal/ethical considerations and implications in the development of IFSPs and IEPs. Fifty to sixty supervised clinical hours are required.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 628G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Reflect upon the legal and ethical responsibilities of a special education teacher.
  2. Take a leadership role at an IEP/IFSP meeting.
  3. Be able to summarize the importance and benefits of family/parent involvement in all stages of the IEP/IFSP process.
  4. Collaborate with a case study child, parents, educators, and other service providers to develop two professional quality IEPs/IFSPs that conform to IDEA 2004 standards.
  5. Enter artifacts into the portfolio demonstrating attained skills.

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EDC 707 - Behavior Interventions for Young Children in Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education

Credits: 4

In this clinical course, students examine basic principles and components of life skills that children need as foundation for the development of positive social skills, e.g., attachment, affiliation, self-regulation, initiative, problem solving, and respect. The student develops and implements a variety of activities and lesson plans to teach young children these critical life skills. Students develop strategies to be used with young children receiving early intervention services and/or to motivate young children in their preschool programs/classrooms by facilitating the development of positive peer relationships, addressing emotional needs, and minimizing disruptions resulting in increased learning. The student documents the use of individual activities and/or classroom strategies in a professional portfolio. Fifty to sixty supervised clinical hours are required.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 630G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

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  1. Examine the six life skills (attachment, affiliation, self-regulation, initiative, problem solving, and respect) children need as foundation for the development of positive social skills.
  2. Identify and implement methods to promote positive interpersonal relationships during early intervention services, in natural environments, preschool programs, and classroom settings.
  3. Examine and propose strategies for difficult to manage behaviors.
  4. Predict the interaction between behavior management and planning for effective instruction.
  5. Develop behavior incentive plans and report on applying time out effectively.
  6. Enter artifacts into the TaskStream e-portfolio demonstrating attained skills.
  7. Understand behavior interventions for young children through forty-nine hours of clinical instruction.
  8. Use technology to tally and graph behaviors for instructional decisions.

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EDC 708 - Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics in Early Childhood and Early Childhood Spec Education

Credits: 4

In this clinical course, students focus on STEM content, effective practice, instructional strategies, materials and curriculum integration, based on standards, inquiry, and connections to the real world. STEM concepts of curiosity, creativity, collaboration, and critical thinking are researched and explored. Students will learn about the Scientific Method, as well as the roles of observation, classification, description, experimentation, application, and imagination. Students will learn how to use technology and interactive media in the early childhood classroom to support learning. The role of engineering in the curriculum will be investigated, including design of methods and ideas for product development. Students will understand and apply math process standards of problem-solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connection, and representation. The course emphasizes application of principles in order to investigate and create experiences which employ STEM concepts and teaching strategies.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): (MTH 402 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): EDU 625SG

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

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  1. Understand the rationale for integration of the STEM curriculum and its impact on learning.
  2. Use problem-solving approaches to investigate and understand mathematics content.
  3. Reflect on best practices in early childhood special education through written assignments and through selection of work samples for professional portfolios.
  4. Use technology to identify developmentally appropriate uses of online resources.
  5. Enter artifacts into the TaskStream e-portfolio demonstrating attained skills.
  6. Understand curriculum, assessment, and instruction through forty-nine hours of clinical observation.

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EDC 709 - Teaching Language Arts and Literacy in Early Childhood and Early Childhood Special Education

Credits: 6

In this clinical course, students develop an understanding of language and literacy development from birth through grade three. Topics include the reciprocal connections between speaking and listening, rhythm and rhyme, communication activities, hearing and reading literature, stories, poetry, music, and written expression. Students engage in appropriate literacy interactions, activities, and assessments to meet the literacy needs of a diverse range of children. Students work with parents and care givers as partners in promoting literacy. The key components of reading (e. g. word recognition, fluency, phonological awareness, etc.) identified by the National Reading Panel for this age level are studied in depth. Students apply their knowledge of how young children develop their own reading skills using these key components of the reading process. Students then evaluate the effectiveness of their instruction.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 601AG

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken EDUC 706.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the key components and development of language.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of various theories of emergent literacy and reading development.
  3. Understand the complexity of learning to read and the many factors that affect the process.
  4. Demonstrate the ability as a member of the educational team to administer appropriate assessments to identify, plan, teach, and evaluate student progress through on-going progress monitoring in the delivery of remedial language arts instruction.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of phonological awareness, synthetic and analytic phonics and apply their knowledge to lessons that they will teach and evaluate.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of word recognition skills and apply their knowledge to lessons that they will teach and evaluate.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of vocabulary development and apply their knowledge to lessons that they will teach and evaluate.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of reading comprehension and apply their knowledge to lessons that they will teach and evaluate.
  9. Demonstrate knowledge of the writing process and apply their knowledge to lessons that they will teach and evaluate.
  10. Review study skills and technology as it applies to reading and writing and apply their knowledge to lessons that they will teach and evaluate.
  11. Develop an appreciation for literature and its effective use in teaching reading and writing.
  12. Explore various reading approaches and programs.
  13. Enter artifacts into the portfolio demonstrating attained skills.
  14. Understand teaching language arts/literacy through fifty-five hours of clinical observation.

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EDC 710 - Curriculum, Assessment and Instruction in Early Childhood/Early Childhood SPED - Birth to Age 8

Credits: 4

In this clinical course, students examine, develop, and evaluate developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction in early childhood and special education settings, for young children age five (kindergarten) through age eight (grade 3). Students use district and state curriculum and integrate subjects with one another. Students develop skills to create and advocate for healthy, supportive, respectful, and challenging learning environments for all children, ages five through eight.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 626G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Examine, develop, and evaluate developmentally-appropriate curriculum and instruction that meets children's needs in the following five developmental areas: physical, cognitive, communication, social/emotional, and adaptive.
  2. Identify, design, and promote individualized supports, strategies, accommodations, and modifications that meet children's educational needs in the following five developmental areas: physical, cognitive, communication, social/emotional, and adaptive.
  3. Identify and evaluate developmentally appropriate curricular and instructional objectives in relation to the New Hampshire Early Learning Guidelines to include: physical, social/emotional, approaches to learning, creative expression/aesthetic, communication and literacy, health and safety, and cognitive.
  4. Collaborate with the general education teacher and use the local curriculum in the design of several lesson plans integrating subjects with one another (e.g., science, math, engineering, technology, visual arts, writing, social studies, physical education, literacy, reading, social/emotional, etc).
  5. Collaborate on a case study with a child's parents, educators, and other service providers; synthesize information to develop adapted lesson plans to meet the individual needs of students.
  6. Research informal assessment procedures.
  7. Summarize the impact of various factors on educational performance.
  8. Implement lesson plans and their adaptations.
  9. Reflect upon the effectiveness of lessons.
  10. Reflect on best practices in early childhood special education through written assignments, and through selection of work samples for professional portfolios.
  11. Organize relevant resources.
  12. Enter artifacts into the portfolio demonstrating attained skills.
  13. Understand curriculum, assessment and instruction EC and EC/SPED (ages birth-eight) through fifty-five hours of clinical observation.
  14. Use technology to implement developmentally appropriate online applications for toddlers and children.
  15. Enter artifacts into the TaskStream e-portfolio demonstrating attained skills.
  16. Understand curriculum, assessment and instruction (birth to age five) through fifty-five hours of clinical observation.

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EDC 711 - Managing Student Behavior (non-clinical)

Credits: 4

This course is designed for non-teacher preparatory candidates to provide an overview of classroom behavior management. Students observe effective teachers using instructional management strategies. They administer and interpret questionnaires to analyze the classroom environment and identify student needs. They identify strategies to help students meet these needs, to increase motivation, to develop positive peer relationships, and to minimize disruption.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 525 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 509G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 623G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Recognize basic psychological needs, as well as behavioral and social development and be able to analyze the dynamics in the classroom and develop a comprehensive classroom behavior management plan. (Pivotal Standard #1)
  2. Assess and develop interventions for students by conducting a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) and developing a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP): includes multiple data points (ABC data collection, scatterplot, interviews, and records review). (Pivotal Standard #2)
  3. Develop lesson plans to teach social-behavioral skills. (Pivotal Standard #3)
  4. Develop proficiency in formative assessment and reflective analysis of student work focusing on behavior/social-emotional learning targets. (Pivotal Standard #4)
  5. Recognize the interaction between behavior management and planning for effective instruction.
  6. Collaborate with school personnel to discuss and summarize school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports (SWPBIS), policies, and assessments that implement techniques to enhance motivation and learning.
  7. Identify and use technology tools for data collection and classroom management.

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EDC 712 - Observation and Assessment in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide early childhood educators with the ability to use a variety of assessment methods to determine the developmental levels and needs of young children. Students are introduced to the meaning and uses of authentic assessment as well as various tools and assessment strategies. The course addresses the interpretation of observational and assessment data to monitor children's progress, guide instructional practice, and identify and refer at-risk children. Prior completion of EDC 602 Learning and Early Childhood Environments is recommended.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 601G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Demonstrate knowledge of specific disabilities, including their etiology, characteristics, and classification; identify risk factors associated with specific disabilities.
  2. Describe key components of federal and state legislation, referral procedures, and the special education process.
  3. Understand the role of screening children for potential disabilities in making appropriate referrals.
  4. Apply knowledge of specific disabilities to appropriately adapt the early childhood curriculum and environment in order to meet the needs of all children.
  5. Become familiar with assessment tools and procedures used to identify special needs, and demonstrate the ability to use evaluation data to design intervention strategies that integrate the goals and objectives of IEPs and IFSPs.
  6. Develop observation techniques and the skills to report observations effectively.
  7. Identify appropriate resources to assist families with their priorities and concerns.
  8. Demonstrate competence using a family-centered approach by working with families in appropriate settings.
  9. Develop the ability to participate, under supervision, as a member of an early childhood intervention team.
  10. Critically reflect on best practices for children with disabilities through written assignments.
  11. Demonstrate their reflective learning skills and professional growth in NAEYC Standards by selecting a completed assignment and submitting a written reflection for their portfolio as a culminating experience if appropriate for their major.

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EDC 713 - Family and Community Relations in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 4

This course examines various ways of enhancing the young child's development through promoting positive interrelationships among child care providers, parents, and others in the community. Using an ecological systems framework, the course builds knowledge of the roles of diverse family structures, cultural identities, stressors and supports, economic circumstances, and community characteristics and resources in facilitating child development. Students develop skills needed for communicating effectively with families, facilitating parent education, and promoting family involvement with child care settings as well as utilization of community resources. NOTE: Prior completion of SOSC 675 Dynamics of Family Relationships is recommended.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): EDU 603G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain how various aspects of family structures, parenting skills, ethnicity, and socio-economic status affect children's development and learning.
  2. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills that foster mutual respect and that encourage families to be active participants in their children's growth and development.
  3. Explain the different types of educational approaches available for working with parents (e.g. workshops, support groups, family conferences).
  4. Design and implement at least one educational experience, or assemble at least one set of materials, to enhance family member's knowledge of child development and capacity to support early learning in the home.
  5. Describe and evaluate various approaches to enhancing family literacy and numeracy, and knowledge of health and safety practices as they relate to optimal child growth and development.
  6. Explain strategies for involving parents/family members with child care providers as partners in promoting learning and accessing community services.
  7. Describe various approaches to early intervention screening and assessment for children who may benefit from health or community services.
  8. Explain appropriate methods of linking families to resources and processes for referral to health, mental health, English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), and economic assistance services and/or agencies as appropriate.
  9. Critically reflect on best practices for promoting strong positive interrelationships among families, early care and education, and communities through written assignments and through selection of work samples for their professional portfolios.
  10. Demonstrate their reflective learning skills and professional growth in NAEYC Standards by selecting a completed assignment and submitting a written reflection for their portfolio as a culminating experience if appropriate for their major.

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EDC 716 - Students with Disabilities

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the thirteen Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) educational disabilities and the opportunity to explore the implications of disability on learning. Students will develop knowledge of specific disabilities including: definition, diagnosis, etiology, prevalence, characteristics, adaptive behavior, and systems of support and resources. Students will explore how disability impacts learning and access to the general education curriculum. Students will research and identify teaching strategies, Universal Design for Learning (UDL) strategies, interventions, and educational and assistive technologies to enhance learning and provide equity in the classroom for students with disabilities.

Equivalent(s): EDU 617G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken EDUC 650, EDUC 750.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Reflect upon the foundations of special education, changing views of disability, and the planning and delivery of special education services.
  2. Identify and summarize cognitive, physical, sensory, behavioral, and social-emotional characteristics of and adaptive behaviors associated with specific disabilities as defined under IDEA, and how they impact learning and daily living.
  3. Apply the principles of Universal Design for Learning and identify strategies in the areas of multiple means of representation, action and expression and engagement, to support inclusion of students with disabilities in the general education classroom.
  4. Identify and summarize instructional strategies, accommodations, modifications, interventions, and evidence-based practices to support the inclusion of students with disabilities in the classroom and the community.
  5. Give examples of assistive technologies to support learners with disabilities.
  6. Create a resource of systems of support, including related service providers and disability-related resources for each of the IDEA disabilities.

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EDC 717 - Positive Behavior Guidance and Student Engagement

Credits: 4

In this clinical course, students explore the theory of social-emotional development, preventative intervention strategies, and the characteristics of safe and supportive learning communities. Students examine specific strategies for motivating students and promoting positive relationships between colleagues, students, and parents in an effort to enhance learning. Students conduct a functional behavior assessment as they develop a comprehensive perspective on classroom culture through the development of proactive management skills and intervention strategies.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 619G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. DEVELOP a Classroom Behavior Management plan based on a specific age/grade.
  2. CONDUCT Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) and develop Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP).
  3. TEACH foundational skills in math or English Language Arts.
  4. Collaborate with school personnel to discuss and summarize school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports (SWPBIS), policies and assessments that implement techniques to enhance motivation and learning.
  5. Recognize the interaction between behavior management and planning for effective instruction.
  6. Identify and use technology tools for data collection and classroom management.
  7. Complete 55-60 clinical hours in a K-12 environment.

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EDC 718 - Transition Planning & Developing IEPs

Credits: 2

This clinical course focuses on the components and processes involved in the development of Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). Under the supervision of a supervising practitioner, students review school records, observe IEP team meetings, consult with district evaluators, student and parents, analyze previously written IEPs and progress reports, and develop the skills necessary to prepare IEPs inclusive of transition plans. During the culminating activity of the course, students develop an IEP and transition plan as a vehicle for exploring the legal and ethical considerations and implications in the development, implementation, and evaluation of IEPs.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 609G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Collaborate to develop one IEP/Transition Plan that conform to IDEA 2004 standards.
  2. Review NH Law as it relates to the responsibilities of a special education teacher.
  3. Summarize the legal, ethical, and effective practices for a successful IEP.
  4. Learn to write measurable goals and determine data based progress monitoring.
  5. Compare the IFSP and IEP process (timelines, team participants, and required components, including transitions).
  6. Understand the intent of the new regulations in IDEA 2004 regarding transitioning.

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EDC 719 - Using Technology to Teach Social Studies

Credits: 4

Technology is a necessary tool in teaching today's youth. In this clinical course, students focus on developing three broad skills: (1) how to design and teach an integrated social studies unit that challenges and assists K-8 students to think deeply, (2) how to incorporate into the plan a wide range of mostly constructivist instructional strategies, and (3) how to integrate a rich array of technology tools and digital educational content in a way that amplifies student learning.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 612G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop and teach ten social studies lessons to students in grades K-8 using Understanding by Design (UBD) that address standards in the areas of Social Studies (at least two Strands: Civics, Economics, Geography, New Hampshire and United States History, World History and Contemporary Issues), and include cross curricular standards from the Arts, Literature, and Technology. (Pivotal Standard #1)
  2. Use a constructivist approach, the rigor and relevancy framework, inquiry and problem based learning teaching methods to address equity for all learners. (Pivotal Standard #2)
  3. Compare learning theories and the Rigor/Relevancy framework and its implication for teaching social studies.
  4. Develop a web-based inquiry learning activity to enhance student learning, develop higher order thinking skills and integrate technology into a social studies unit.
  5. Utilize collaboration and PLC's to improve student learning.
  6. Write a research paper that addresses the legal, ethical and cultural issues to consider when integrating educational technology into K through 12 schools.
  7. Understand and demonstrate ability in formative assessment and reflective analysis of student work. (Pivotal Standard #3).
  8. Complete clinical hours in K-8 environment: (fifty-five hours undergraduate, sixty hours post baccalaureate).

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EDC 720 - Instructional Methods, Strategies, and Technologies to Meet the Needs of All Students

Credits: 4

Through the development of lesson plans in this clinical course, students demonstrate knowledge and expertise of a variety of instructional methods and research-based strategies to improve learning for diverse student populations facing complex individual learning challenges. Students will research instructional strategies and metacognition to determine its effectiveness in increasing independence, enhancing learning, and developing thinking skills in mathematics. Through their understanding of the principles of instruction, assessment, remediation, and technology integration, students develop a comprehensive math unit.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 607G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify Common Core State Standards (CCSS)-Math and respective IEP goals, and ISTE-Student standards to develop 2 units of five lessons in the area of math content. (1 unit f2f and 1 unit web-based)
  2. Develop proficiency in reflective analysis of student work focusing on math content.
  3. Utilize web-based authoring program to develop interactive online unit of five lessons.
  4. Understand the foundations of learning and instruction.
  5. Assess a student's level of understanding in mathematics.
  6. Develop skills for planning and monitoring performance (including formative assessment, reflective analysis and RTI).
  7. Understand and know when to apply: Direct Instruction, Concept Teaching, Problem Based Learning, Questioning and Discussion/Discourse methods of instruction to lessons.
  8. Teach specific instructional strategies to enhance student engagement or learning.
  9. Write a research paper on the effectiveness of strategy based learning (activating cognition/metacognition) to improve educational outcomes for students.
  10. Understand and analyze NHDOE's Performance Plus.

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EDC 721 - Assessment of Students with Disabilities

Credits: 4

This clinical course focuses on the tools and procedures involved in the evaluation and determination of education disabilities. Under the supervision of the district mentor, students review school records, observe an evaluation team meeting, consult with district evaluators, review a variety of assessment tools and evaluation reports, and develop the skills necessary to administrator and interpret some of the assessments commonly used by special education teachers. The culminating activity of the course is the development of a formal assessment report.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 611G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Identify appropriate assessment tools, administer and interpret the assessments, and write a formal assessment report for two students.
  2. Research and REFLECT on the legal and ethical responsibilities of a special education teacher.
  3. Understand the basic terminology and scores in assessment.
  4. Discuss with a qualified examiner the assessment tools typically used to measure intelligence, communication skills, academic skills, and other skills.
  5. Understand evaluation team membership and how the above areas can affect academic learning.
  6. Administer and interpret informal assessments including observations, criterion-referenced tests, and portfolio assessment.
  7. Understand the role of formative assessment, response to instruction in relation to planning appropriate instruction.
  8. Become familiar with reporting student progress, data based measurement, and response to intervention.
  9. Administer and interpret formal assessments including a comprehensive standardized achievement battery and diagnostic assessments.
  10. Write an informal and a formal assessment report.
  11. Understanding of students with disabilities through fifty-five hours of clinical observation.

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EDC 722 - Strategies for Teaching Science

Credits: 4

This clinical course focuses on learning theories and their application to science instruction. Students examine a variety of instructional strategies through readings, observation and participation in their clinical placements, and determine the appropriateness of each in the learning process. Topics include constructivist learning, differentiated learning, and an in-depth look at how the state and national standards guide science instruction. Additional topics include integrated STEM curricula, the appropriate use of technology, and effective formative, summative, and alternative assessment strategies. Students plan, teach and evaluate an integrated thematic unit with lessons that align with Next Generation Science Standards.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 613G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify within STEM standards: science, technology, engineering and math and develop one unit of five lessons incorporating STEM standards.
  2. Utilize WebQuest or other web-based inquiry learning activity to supplement science unit/concepts.
  3. Develop proficiency in reflective analysis of student work focusing on an academic skill.
  4. Use the backward design model: Understanding by Design (UBD), to plan the STEM unit.
  5. Understand and apply research- based instructional models: direct instruction, inquiry learning, concept learning, and problem-based learning and constructivist learning theory.
  6. Develop the ability to use questioning to encourage higher level thinking for diversified learners.
  7. Develop proficiency in formative assessment and reflective analysis of student work.
  8. Understanding of roles and responsibilities of a science educator through fifty-five hours of clinical observation.

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EDC 723 - Teaching Language Arts and Literacy

Credits: 6

This clinical course examines the theoretical foundations of reading and the range of approaches to literacy instruction in the United States. Students explore the interrelated components of reading and writing and develop comprehensive strategies for supporting reading development for all children in grades K-8. In this course students observe classroom instruction in literacy, have opportunities to engage with children in using literacy strategies, and use a range of strategies to assess students' reading and writing. Fifty to sixty supervised clinical hours are required.

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 610G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and interpret major theoretical perspectives on the reading process and evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
  2. Observe and describe strategies used in teaching and assessing reading and writing in elementary classrooms.
  3. Analyze instructional approaches to reading and writing observed in elementary classrooms.
  4. Develop a tool-kit of instructional strategies in comprehension, vocabulary, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, and the writing process that they can implement in teaching students in grades K-5 to strengthen their reading and writing.
  5. Select and use a range of assessment tools to identify individual student's literacy strengths and needs and to plan further instruction.
  6. Design a lesson plan unit for teaching reading and writing in an elementary classroom that incorporates instruction in comprehension, vocabulary, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, and the writing process.
  7. Implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a holistic reading and writing lesson in a K-6 classroom.
  8. Evaluate theoretical models of literacy in the construction of a personal theory of literacy instruction.

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EDC 724 - Elementary School Mathematics Methods

Credits: 4

This clinical course focuses on learning theories and their application to elementary school mathematics instruction. Students research a variety of instructional strategies through readings, observation, and participation in a clinical placement and determine the appropriateness of each in the learning process. Topics include constructivist learning, differentiated learning, and an in-depth look at how the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics guide mathematics instruction. Additional topics include integrated curricula, the appropriate use of technology, and effective formative, summative, and alternative assessment strategies. Students plan two five-lesson mathematics units for two different grade levels, teaching and reflecting on lessons taught in one of the units.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 616G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 703.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Explore and apply systematic teaching and research based learning strategies.
  2. Explain various mathematical concepts through written explanations, examples, and chapter tests.
  3. Apply Understanding by Design (UBD) to plan, develop, and teach mathematics unit plans to enable all students to construct new concepts through active participation in mathematical modeling, investigations, and problem-solving while improving mathematical habits of mind.
  4. Integrate web-based technology into unit plans.
  5. Explain why assessment is vital to successful mathematics instruction.
  6. Analyze data from a variety of assessments to improve student learning.
  7. Develop an improvement plan reflecting strengths and weaknesses, and resources to help meet personal goal.
  8. Enter the key assignments into the exit portfolio demonstrating attained skills.
  9. Use RASWs to increase student achievement in mathematics.
  10. Develop an understanding of mathematics instruction through fifty-five hours of clinical teaching/observation.
  11. Utilize collaboration and PLCs to improve student learning.

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EDC 731 - Aspects of Mathematics Learning

Credits: 4

The clinical course is designed to provide prospective secondary school and middle school teachers with the skills to develop an integrated approach to teaching and learning. It will cover cultural and psychological aspects of learning mathematics, models of instruction and planning, teaching and learning styles, assessment strategies, models and organization and selection of curriculum materials, classroom management, and the role of technology and media within these. Ninety supervised clinical hours are required.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 652G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 700.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Compare and contrast different learning theories and discuss their appropriateness for diverse students.
  2. Plan equitable lessons enabling all students to construct new concepts through active participation in mathematical modeling, investigations, and problem solving.
  3. Plan lessons incorporating manipulatives, current technologies, and formative assessments.
  4. Provide opportunities for students to use written, oral, and other creative expressions to demonstrate their understanding of mathematical concepts to various audiences.
  5. Demonstrate the capacity to appreciate and recognize the value of professional practices which include learning mathematics content independently and collaboratively.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of current state, national and international research, standards, and recommendations regarding teaching of mathematics.
  7. Analyze data to create an action plan to improve student learning.
  8. Develop an improvement plan reflecting strengths and weaknesses and resources to help meet personal goals.
  9. Develop an understanding of mathematics instruction through ninety hours (undergraduate)/sixty hours (post-baccalaureate) of clinical observation / teaching.

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EDC 732 - Reading and Writing in the Mathematics Content Area

Credits: 4

This clinical course is designed to provide prospective secondary and middle school teachers with the knowledge, skills, and resources necessary to incorporate literacy skills into their mathematics content area plans. Emphasis will be on integrating the teaching of reading, writing, and oral literacy skills from various fields; students will explore and practice the methods and strategies, including testing and measurement assessments necessary to meet the diverse literacy needs of today's students allowing them to become independent students. Teaching and discussing theoretical and practical application of current theories and methods involved in teaching literacy to diverse secondary and middle student population within the contemporary pluralistic classroom, including differentiated learning styles through socioeconomic status, gender, and heritage will be emphasized. Ninety supervised clinical hours are required.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D- or EDC 731 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 652G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): EDU 653G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Plan and conduct units and lessons appropriate for the grade range which incorporate literacy strategies that assist students in reading and understanding mathematics. Lessons emphasize connections within and between mathematics and other disciplines.
  2. Communicate an understanding of mathematics, including, but not limited to, the ability to demonstrate a capacity to communicate coherently about mathematics and mathematics education in both written and oral ways using appropriate mathematical language and notation. The ability to interpret and explain mathematical ideas through reading mathematics in professional publications, as well as analyze and assess the mathematical thinking and strategies of others.
  3. Recognize, explore, and develop mathematical connections, including, but not limited to the ability to provide examples of how mathematics is practiced in various fields. Students will build mathematical understanding by identifying and applying connections among mathematical ideas and show how ideas build on one another across grade levels to form a coherent discipline.
  4. Analyze data to create an action plan to improve student learning.
  5. Utilize collaboration and PLCs to improve student learning.
  6. Develop an improvement plan reflecting strengths and weaknesses and resources to help meet personal goals.
  7. Develop an understanding of mathematics instruction through ninety hours of clinical observation/teaching.

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EDC 733 - Middle Level Mathematics Methods

Credits: 4

This clinical course focuses on mathematics learning theories and their application to middle school mathematics instruction. Students examine a variety of instructional strategies through readings, observation and supervised teaching. Topics include constructivist learning, differentiated learning, and an in-depth look at how the state and national standards guide mathematics instruction. Additional topics include integrated curricula, the appropriate use of technology, and effective formative, summative, and alternative assessment strategies. Students plan two, five-lesson mathematics units for two different grade levels, teaching and reflecting on lessons taught in one of the units. Depending on the certification program, a range of fifty to ninety supervised clinical hours are required.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): (EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDC 732 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 653G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): EDU 614G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 703, MATH 709.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply Understanding by Design (UBD) to develop and apply mathematics unit plans to enable all students to construct new concepts through active participation in mathematical modeling, investigations, and problem-solving while improving mathematical habits of mind.
  2. Integrate web-based technology into unit plans.
  3. Analyze data from a variety of assessments to create an action plan to improve student learning.
  4. Explore and apply systematic teaching and research-based learning strategies.
  5. Explain various mathematical concepts through written explanations, examples, and formative and summative assessments.
  6. Utilize technology to enhance student learning (advanced level).
  7. Plan, implement, teach, and evaluate mathematics lessons, both face-to-face and online.
  8. Explain why assessment is vital to successful mathematics instruction.
  9. Utilize collaboration and PLCs to improve student learning.
  10. Develop an improvement plan reflecting strengths and weaknesses and resources to help meet personal goals.
  11. Develop an understanding of mathematics instruction through ninety hours of clinical observation/teaching.

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EDC 734 - Upper Level Mathematics Methods

Credits: 4

This clinical course focuses on mathematics learning theories and their application to secondary mathematics instruction. Students examine a variety of instructional strategies through readings, observation, and supervised teaching. Topics include constructivist learning, differentiated learning, and an in-depth look at how the state and national standards guide mathematics instruction. Additional topics include integrated curricula, the appropriate use of technology, and effective formative, summative, and alternative assessment strategies. Students plan two, 5-lesson mathematics units for two different grade levels, teaching and reflecting on lessons taught in one of the units. Depending on the certification program, a range of fifty to ninety supervised clinical hours are required.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): (EDC 700 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 622G with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDC 732 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 653G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): EDU 615G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 709.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply Understanding by Design (UBD) to develop and apply mathematics unit plans to enable all students to construct new concepts through active participation in mathematical modeling, investigations, and problem-solving while improving mathematical habits of mind.
  2. Integrate web-based technology into unit plans.
  3. Analyze data from a variety of assessments to create an action plan to improve student learning.
  4. Explore and apply systematic teaching and research-based learning strategies.
  5. Explain various mathematical concepts through written explanations, examples, and formative and summative assessments.
  6. Utilize technology to enhance student learning (advanced level).
  7. Plan, implement, teach, and evaluate mathematics lessons, both face-to-face and online.
  8. Explain why assessment is vital to successful mathematics instruction.
  9. Utilize collaboration and PLCs to improve student learning.
  10. Develop an improvement plan reflecting strengths and weaknesses and resources to help meet personal goals.
  11. Develop an understanding of mathematics instruction through ninety hours of clinical observation/teaching.

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EDC 790 - Integrative: English Language Arts

Credits: 4

This capstone course in English Language Arts builds on all previous work in both education and English. Students explore current research in the field of English Language Arts education and synthesize their knowledge to build effective instructional practices that support children's learning. Prior to capstone enrollment, students are expected to complete the majority of their required major courses. Students should consult with their advisor regarding specific major courses that may be completed with their capstone. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

Prerequisite(s): (CRIT 602 with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 602G with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (IDIS 601 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 601G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): EDU 660G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Interpret and critique English Language Arts standards and current theories regarding literacy instruction and the research upon which they are based.
  2. Articulate and analyze the importance of the various components of literacy and of a balanced approach to reading and writing instruction at the elementary level.
  3. Build awareness of scaffolding techniques to use in writing instruction and in shared, modeled, interactive, guided, and independent reading and writing.
  4. Synthesize information from research, formulating strategies to facilitate the development of comprehension through reading, writing, and direct instruction.
  5. Evaluate, select, and implement methodologies, approaches, and accommodations when teaching and assessing literacy for English language learners and children with diverse needs.
  6. Apply knowledge of best practice instruction in designing and implementing a lesson plan unit that provides instruction in English Language Arts for elementary students.

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EDC 791 - Integrative: Social Studies

Credits: 4

This capstone course in Social Studies builds on all previous work in both education and Social Studies. Students explore current research in the field of Social Studies and synthesize their knowledge to build effective instructional practices that support children's learning. Prior to capstone enrollment, students are expected to complete the majority of their required major courses. Students should consult with their advisor regarding specific major courses that may be completed with their capstone. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

Prerequisite(s): (CRIT 602 with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 602G with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (IDIS 601 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 601G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): EDU 661G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand the challenges and instructional implications facing educators related to 21st century students (diversity, tech-savvyness, and new forms of cognition), 21st century skills, and 21st century learning environments.
  2. Explore research on how children and adults learn best and the resulting need for increased use of real world project-based learning and authentic assessment.
  3. Gain an understanding of social scientific research traditions relating to quantitative, qualitative, and action research, and of the parallels between teacher-led inquiry and student-led social scientific inquiry.
  4. Learn about technology resources, tools, and strategies that optimize student engagement and learning results and facilitate equitable student access to compelling learning opportunities.
  5. Apply knowledge of best practice instruction in designing, implementing, and evaluating a unit that provides instruction in Social Studies for elementary and/or secondary students, using technology, project-based learning and authentic assessment.

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EDC 792 - Integrative: Mathematics Studies

Credits: 4

This capstone course in Math Studies builds on all previous work in both education and Math Studies. Students explore current research in the field of Math and synthesize their knowledge to build effective instructional practices that support children's learning. Prior to capstone enrollment, students are expected to complete the majority of their required major courses. Students should consult with their advisor regarding specific major courses that may be completed with their capstone. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

Prerequisite(s): (CRIT 602 with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 602G with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (IDIS 601 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 601G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): EDU 665G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Research areas of real-world applications for algebra, geometry, pre-calculus, and calculus and create an extensive portfolio of these applications that connect to the topics and objectives from these subjects.
  2. Create a bibliography of computer websites, apps, and technologically-based activities that support the concepts studied in algebra, geometry, statistics, pre-calculus, and calculus.
  3. Focusing on one mathematical concept, trace its historical development and then extensively research different ways that this concept could be taught. Include traditional methods, constructivist methods, and methods that use different types of technology.
  4. Research and analyze the trends of mathematics instruction in the last fifty years and compare and contrast them to current theories.

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EDC 797 - Practicum: Professionalism in Early Childhood Education

Credits: 4

This clinical course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to apply early childhood educational and developmental theory to practice in a licensed early childhood setting. Students participate in an approved site where they plan and implement curriculum under the supervision of a credentialed early childhood professional. This capstone experience allows the student to integrate course work in early childhood education, curriculum, assessment, and child development. In addition, students reflect upon and analyze field experiences. Prior to capstone enrollment, students are expected to complete the majority of their required major courses. Students should consult with their advisor regarding specific major courses that may be completed with their capstone. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): (CRIT 602 with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 602G with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (IDIS 601 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 601G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): EDU 650G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Promote development and learning of preschool children or school-age youth by applying a range of teaching/learning methods with children in a variety of educational settings.
  2. Communicate effectively to build family and community relationships and engage families in their children's development and learning.
  3. Implement developmentally appropriate activities, curricula, and discipline and classroom management strategies and critique them for their effectiveness.
  4. Observe, document, and assess behavior and development and keep appropriate records.
  5. Apply developmental and educational theory and research to classroom practice and articulate the connections.
  6. Analyze and evaluate field experiences, including the supervised experience in the classroom.
  7. Reflect upon and revise a personal philosophy of education.
  8. Apply standards of professional ethical conduct in all field experiences.
  9. Advocate for the rights and needs of children and families and education professionals.
  10. Complete a portfolio that represents growth in professional knowledge and thinking during their undergraduate education program.

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EDC 798 - Culminating Teaching Experience and Seminar

Credits: 4

This course is the culminating experience in the plan of study toward NH teacher certification. This course gives teacher candidates an opportunity to be mentored in their field of certification by experienced teachers holding graduate degrees and to practice the variety of methods and strategies studied in the teacher preparation program. Teacher candidates enrolled in this course may be at different stages of acquiring the three hundred sixty to four hundred forty hours of supervised teaching experience. Additionally, teacher candidates will use the Teacher Candidate Assessment of Performance process to develop a final culminating document that demonstrates their proficiency in the areas of contextualization, planning and preparation, instruction, academic language, assessment, and reflection.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): EDU 651G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Special Fee: Yes

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Construct a philosophy of developmentally appropriate educational practice that reflects the belief that all children/students can learn and develop to their full potential, and shows respect for the gifts and talents of all children/students.
  2. Design developmentally appropriate practice and lesson plans that demonstrate their knowledge of the content they teach; and are able to connect to state and local curriculum frameworks and guidelines, the community, and the ever changing nature of knowledge.
  3. Design developmentally appropriate practices and instruction that supports the cognitive, language, moral, social, emotional, physical, and creative development of children/students.
  4. Design instruction that demonstrates an understanding of diversity of learners and uses a variety of resources including technology.
  5. Create learning environments that are collaborative, challenging, dynamic, safe, and encourage openness, respect and caring.
  6. Use formal and informal assessments to continually monitor children's/student's learning needs, program design, and teaching effectiveness, and have the ability to communicate the results to children, parents and colleagues.
  7. Model professionalism in all aspects including: communication, ethics, self-reflection, professional development, and community/school and district involvement.
  8. Communicate the TCAP expectations to the faculty members of their clinical site.
  9. Use SWIVL video in a self-reflection process.
  10. Submit a completed TCAP A-Z document detailing the process and outcome of the culminating teaching experience.
  11. Complete the Exit Survey: https://www/surveymonkey.com/s/8TPST83

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Instructional Studies (INST)

INST 544 - Special Topics: Lower Level

Credits: 1-4

A study of current and variable topics in instructional studies. Course content changes from term to term.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): INST 544G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

INST 615 - Engaging Adult Learners in the Digital Age

Credits: 4

Educators and trainers often feel compelled to use the latest technologies in their teaching practice to keep pace with culture and attract learners. Yet technology for technology's sake doesn't automatically help learners meet learning outcomes and can have an unintended negative impact on learning experiences if not selected properly. This course will provide guided practice-based learning activities to develop the skills needed to review, analyze, and select appropriate educational technologies for engaging education experiences for adult learners in a variety of settings.

Equivalent(s): INST 615G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe critical steps needed to ensure educational technology is relevant and reliable to help learners meet outcomes.
  2. Analyze educational technologies through comprehensive processes including evaluation, interpretation, calculation, and application.
  3. Select and demonstrate educational technology analysis using relevant and real-world case studies.
  4. Define and defend solutions to educational challenges using appropriate educational technologies.
  5. Synthesize current and emerging research on educational technology solutions to create a learning toolkit that describes and links research on effective adult learning technologies.
  6. Using digital or visual content, design and present a plan that outlines a personal and/or professional adult learning goal related to educational technology.
  7. Connect digitally with at least two relevant professional networks and contribute to the fields through curiosity, sociality, or resource sharing.

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INST 701 - Teaching and Learning in Adulthood

Credits: 4

This course examines the nature and process of teaching and learning in adulthood by reviewing and building on theories and philosophies of adult learning. It focuses on teaching adults in formal, informal, and non-formal settings. Understanding cognition and the learning process provides the foundation to employing instructional strategies that empower the adult learner. Students will explore active learning, collaborative learning, self-directed learning in relationship to learning strategies, motivation and the importance of practice, experience, self-reflection, and assessment.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): INST 605G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Compare and contrast the principles of major theories of learning and cognition and how they relate to adult learners.
  2. Explain the development of cognitive processes throughout adulthood.
  3. Provide a rationale for instructional strategies based on specific cognitive and/or learning principles.
  4. Formulate and articulate a personal philosophy of adult education informed by principles and theories of adult learning.
  5. Incorporate their personal philosophy of learning in the design of instructional strategies for teaching in a variety of learning environments.
  6. Explore, experience, and analyze various instructional strategies and their relationship to individual differences, and experiential learning.
  7. Compare and contrast the characteristics of instructor-centered versus learner-centered and subject-centered teaching and their effectiveness in promoting active learning, collaborative learning, self-direction and reflection by students.
  8. Demonstrate the importance of practice, experience, and critical reflection of both learners and teachers for personal and professional development.
  9. Reflect on how issues of race, gender, disabilities, class, age, and sexual orientation influence teaching and learning and in the development of 21st century workplace skills.
  10. Analyze viable adult learning assessment techniques and how they correspond to various instructional strategies used in teaching adults.
  11. Discuss future direction for research and practice in teaching and learning in adulthood.

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INST 702 - The Learning Workplace

Credits: 4

This course deals with the professional learning needs and priorities of the workplace with an emphasis on business and industry settings. It examines the variety of ways in which employees and their managers gain new knowledge and skills as part of their on-going involvement in both their jobs and in formal, informal, and non-formal learning situations. Careful attention is given to understanding and applying effective transfer of learning strategies. The roles of in-house training, corporate university, individualized learning, distance learning, online learning, and external providers are also examined.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): INST 607G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and explain the forces which are making it necessary for the workplace to become a learning workplace.
  2. Summarize the history of workplace learning in the United States since the 1940's.
  3. Define what is meant by the term "learning organization," and explain the major characteristics mentioned in key sources.
  4. Describe the full continuum of the kinds and levels of learning that are presently incorporated in one or more major workplaces.
  5. Outline the major components of the training and development function within selected organizations including development of 21st century skills.
  6. Explain the ways in which adult learning and development theory appear to inform the design and practice of selected workplace learning environments.
  7. Research and describe "best practice" in workplace learning within an industry or employment field with which the participant is familiar.
  8. Explain the "global" piece of learning organizations that identify themselves as players in this arena.
  9. Explore, analyze, and develop a means of professional preparation for future workplace learning trends.

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INST 703 - Instructional Design and Interactive Learning

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to theory and practice of instructional design and its role in developing interactive learning. It covers all the necessary elements to analyze, design, develop, implement, and evaluate effective learning, including interactive learning systems, and cultivates the effective combination of technology and instruction. The course addresses the different models used to develop effective instruction and expands the student's understanding of how to facilitate meaningful connections in learning through collaboration, discovery, and engagement.

Equivalent(s): INST 610G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the elements of an instructional design process.
  2. Illustrate the role instructional design plays in developing effective interactive learning systems.
  3. Compare and contrast various interactive learning systems by examining their intended use in the classroom and/or how they can be used to produce multimedia instructional content.
  4. Explain how an interactive learning tool could enhance or detract from an androgogical strategy while developing instruction.
  5. Design and develop a comprehensive Instructional Design Project plan for a real or hypothetical training/educational program that incorporates an instructional design process and integrates interactive learning theory and systems as appropriate.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of creativity and innovation in instructional design.
  7. Develop and apply criteria to evaluate interactive learning systems based on best practices.
  8. Analyze current trends in instructional design and interactive learning educational technology.

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INST 797 - Program Development and Learning

Credits: 4

This course encompasses a broad spectrum of program development ranging from an individual course to a complete program of major learning activities conducted over a period of time for the education and training of adults. This project- based course serves as the Integrative Capstone and is designed to provide an opportunity to apply and practice theories, skills, and principles to a variety of situations adult educators may encounter in practice. Prior to capstone enrollment, students are expected to complete the majority of their required major courses. Students should consult with their advisor regarding specific major courses that may be completed with their capstone. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): (CRIT 602 with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 602G with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (IDIS 601 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 601G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): INST 650G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply principles of adult learning and development to the program development process.
  2. Examine and evaluate alternative program development models for a given training need.
  3. Integrate and apply concepts of program development and learning in an area of professional interest by developing a learning experience that includes: a. Needs assessment b. Learning outcomes c. Types and sequencing of skills d. Student characteristics e. Appropriate instructional strategies f. Formative evaluation and revision of design and/or materials g. Demonstrate creative thinking and innovative application of program concepts
  4. Create, assemble, and test instruction.
  5. Determine an evaluation strategy that is appropriate to the program and its intended outcomes.
  6. Develop a metacognition self-reflection that facilitates the students work and evaluates it against best practices in program learning and development.

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Mathematics (MTH)

MTH 402 - Math for Our World

Credits: 4

This course takes an integrated approach to the study of mathematics, combining mathematical concepts with applications in the real world. It addresses topics in mathematics necessary in a college education, providing the reasoning strategies needed for mathematical problem solving in the workplace, the media, and everyday life. The course serves as the foundation for higher-level math courses and provides the quantitative skills necessary to be adequately prepared for coursework in other academic areas. The overarching goal is to learn to interpret quantitative and statistical information that we encounter daily. Students will understand how real-world problems can be analyzed using the power and rigor of mathematical and statistical models. Topics include: problem solving, math of finance, geometry, basic probability, and beginning statistical concepts with an emphasis on real world applications and interpreting information. The use of Excel will be incorporated into the topics of this course. Acceptable scores on Accuplacer Arithmetic and Elementary Algebra Accuplacer Classic or Next Generation Accuplacer assessments; or approved exemption based on previous high school transcripts: a grade of C or better in both Algebra and Geometry taken within the last five years; or SAT Math score of 500+ or ACT Math score of 18+ taken within five years of registration; or successful completion of the ALEKS Program Math Tutorial as determined by the college's math faculty required. Accuplacer or ALEKS assessments should be completed within five years of registering for course.

Attributes: Mathematics (Gen Ed); Quantitative Reasoning(Disc)

Prerequisite(s): (Classic Arithmetic Accuplacer with a score of 080 and CL Elem Algebra - Accuplacer with a score of 036) or (Arithmetic Accuplacer-Next Gen with a score of 263 and Quant,Alg,Stats Accp-Next Gen with a score of 237) or C MATH 405/or taken elsewhere with a score of WAIV or SAT Math with a score of 500 or ACT Reading with a score of 18 or GSC Math Workshop Completed with a score of WAIV.

Equivalent(s): MATH 502G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Select appropriate approaches and methods, such as logic, set theory, estimation, and proportional reasoning, to solve problems.
  2. Assess reasonableness of answers, identify alternatives, and select the best solutions.
  3. Extract quantitative data for a given situation from different types of mathematical models.
  4. Translate word problems into their symbolic representations.
  5. Use mathematical modeling to solve application problems symbolically, numerically, and graphically.
  6. Use probability to make inferences and informed decisions.
  7. Organize data and make predictions about real-world situations using statistical methods and models.

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MTH 504 - Statistics

Credits: 4

This course addresses introductory statistical concepts, methods, and procedures important for making well-informed decisions in real world settings. It provides students with both theoretical principles and practical skills in statistics. Topics include an overview of descriptive and inferential statistics, specifically sampling, measurements of central tendency and dispersion, frequency distributions, graphing techniques, probability theory, hypothesis testing, normal distribution, regression and correlation, t-tests, and analysis of variance. An acceptable score on the Classic or Next Generation Accuplacer arithmetic and elementary algebra assessment. Accuplacer assessments should be completed within five years of registering for course. NOTE: Excel proficiency is expected prior to enrollment in this course.

Attributes: Mathematics (Gen Ed); Quantitative Reasoning(Disc)

Prerequisite(s): MTH 402 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 502G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 504G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 402, PSYC 402H, SOC 402, SOC 402H, SOC 502, SOC 502H.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Recognize the use of best practices in design of experiments including sampling procedures, and data collection methods in real world situations.
  2. Interpret basic data visualization techniques, such as frequency distributions, bar charts, histograms, boxplots, scatterplots, and time series.
  3. Solve basic problems based on and describe the intended use for measurements of central tendency and dispersion including means, medians and modes; and variance, standard deviations, z-scores, and percentiles.
  4. Apply basic probability rules and characteristics of discrete and continuous probability distributions to solve and interpret real-world problems.
  5. Explain concepts used to arrive at a hypothesis for real-world situations and test its validity.
  6. Discuss current ethical standards that pertain to the use of statistical methods, data, and research results in modern day.

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MTH 510 - Pre-Calculus

Credits: 4

This course is intended as a bridge course between algebra and calculus. The course focuses on strengthening the student's mathematical problem solving skills and developing a firm understanding of functions, their graphical representation, their behavior, and their use to model real-life situations. Various classes of functions will be highlighted: polynomials, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric. Topics may also include: algebraic concepts, real number system, systems of equations and inequalities, complex numbers, and polar coordinates. An acceptable score on the Classic or Next Generation Accuplacer assessment(s) is accepted prior to taking this course. Accuplacer assessments should be completed within five years of registering for course. A graphing calculator is required.

Attributes: Mathematics (Gen Ed); Quantitative Reasoning(Disc)

Prerequisite(s): MTH 402 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 502G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 510G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Define a function verbally, numerically, visually, and algebraically as well as define and find its domain and range.
  2. Perform operations on functions such as: addition, multiplication, division, composition, and finding inverse functions.
  3. Graph and specify the algebraic characteristics of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, both by hand and by graphing calculators.
  4. Identify the characteristics of the conic sections, both graphically and algebraically.
  5. Manipulate and evaluate algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.
  6. Employ mathematical modeling techniques to solve problems using polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.
  7. Solve problems involving the intermediate value theorem, the division algorithm of polynomials, the remainder theorem, the factor theorem, and zeros of a polynomial.
  8. Solve problems involving systems of equations and inequalities in two unknowns.
  9. Interpret and define the six trigonometric functions, in terms of both right triangles and the unit circle.
  10. Graph trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, with and without the aid of a graphing calculator.
  11. Verify and apply trigonometric identities and formulas and apply them to solve trigonometric equations and word problems.
  12. Gain skill in the use of polar coordinates, specifically perform conversions between polar and Cartesian coordinates and sketch graphs of polar curves in both Cartesian and polar coordinates both by hand and using technology.

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MTH 544 - Special Topics: Lower Level

Credits: 1-4

A study of current and variable topic in mathematics. Course content will change from term to term.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): MATH 544G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

MTH 701 - Probability and Statistics

Credits: 4

In this course students study topics in data analysis including: descriptive and inferential statistics, probability, odds and fair games, probability distributions, normal distributions, and estimation. Among the topics are numerical and graphical summaries for one and two variables, linear regression and correlation, confidence intervals and tests concerning means, sampling and experimentation, basic probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, sampling distributions, two-sample t-tests for means, chi-squared tests, regress and correlation, and possible other topics. A standards statistical software package is used throughout the course to support the course format that includes: hands-on activities, computer-based simulations, creating and implementing student developed investigations, and actual secondary and middle school mathematics classroom activities. Throughout the course students are given opportunities to relate the mathematical concepts studied in this course to the mathematical concepts they will be teaching.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 402 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 502G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 603G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 439, MATH 539, MATH #623, PSYC 402, SOC 402, SOC 402H, SOC 502.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Design investigations, collect data, display data in a variety of ways, and interpret data representations including bivariate data, conditional probability, and geometric probability.
  2. Use appropriate methods to estimate population characteristics, test conjectured relationships among variables, and analyze data.
  3. Use appropriate statistical methods and technology to analyze data and describe shape, spread, and center.
  4. Use both descriptive statistics to analyze data, make predictions, test hypotheses, and make decisions.
  5. Draw conclusions involving uncertainty by using hands-on and computer-based simulations.
  6. Apply probability concepts in identifying odds, fair games, mathematical expectation, and invalid conclusions.
  7. Judge the validity of a statistical argument, including evaluating the sample from which the statistics were developed and identify misuses of statistics.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of probability and statistics.
  9. Determine and compare experimental, theoretical, and conditional probabilities.
  10. Use statistical models to explore the connections between statistics and probability including correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. (Standard ~ 612.18 NH (7.a-j) ; Standard ~ 612017 NH (7.a-j))

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MTH 702 - Mathematical Proof

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the language and methods used to create and write mathematical proofs and solve problems. Methods of proof will include: direct, contrapositive, contradiction, and induction. Methods of problem solving will be based on Polya's four steps for problem solving. Students will learn about and utilize the many functions of proof including: verification, explanation, communication, discovery, justification, and inquiry. The course will also explore the relationship between problem solving and the process of proving. Students will explore fundamental abstract concepts in mathematics chosen from the following areas: functions and relations, set theory, number theory, and logic, Euclidian and non-Euclidian geometry, algebra, mathematical reasoning, proof, and problem solving. Connections to middle and secondary school mathematics.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 510 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 510G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 600G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Use problem solving to investigate and understand increasingly complex mathematical content, including, but not limited to the ability to use problem-solving to develop ones own mathematical knowledge, reflect upon solutions and the problem-solving process, as well as refine strategies as needed.
  2. Use mathematical proof, including, but not limited to, the ability to develop and evaluate mathematical conjectures, to construct and evaluate proofs and logical arguments to verify conjectures, to select and use various types of reasoning and methods of proof, and to demonstrate the capacity to articulate an understanding of how reasoning and proof are integral components of mathematics.

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MTH 703 - Number Systems

Credits: 4

This course examines the structure and properties of mathematics while focusing on the development of mental mathematics strategies and problem solving skills. Topics include sets, functions, applications of rational numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, percentages, and number theory. Appropriate grade level techniques are utilized to investigate algorithms, probability and statistics, counting techniques, scientific notation, complex numbers, exponents, geometry, and measurement. Students will also investigate ratios, proportion, data analysis, patterns, and the connections to algebra and geometry topics in the context of the 5-12 grades mathematics curriculum.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 510 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 510G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 601G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 621.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a capacity to use models to explore certain relationships, including magnitude, among fractions, decimals, percents, rations, and proportions.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of number and number systems.
  3. Apply, explain, and justify concepts in number and number theory.
  4. Demonstrate computational proficiency and fluency, including the use of a variety of algorithms, estimation strategies, and mental mathematics techniques to judge the reasonableness of answers or approximate solutions.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of concepts and applications of limits and infinity.
  6. Demonstrate a capacity to apply the concepts of proportional reasoning.
  7. Demonstrate a capacity to make sense of large and small numbers and use scientific notation in mathematical and scientific modeling.

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MTH 704 - Geometric Structures

Credits: 4

This course will examine concepts in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Course topics include area and volume, two- and three-dimensional perspective, congruence and similarity, properties of and relationships among geometric shapes and structures. Students will investigate graphing, vectors, motion, and symmetry. Students engage in course concepts through proofs, problem solving, dynamic geometric software, and through activities used in secondary and middle school mathematics. Throughout the course students will be given opportunities to relate the mathematical concepts studied to the mathematical concepts they will be teaching.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 510 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 510G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 602G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Build and manipulate representations of 2 and 3 dimensional objects and perceive an object from different perspectives.
  2. Analyze properties of and relationships among geometric shapes and structures.
  3. Apply transformations with connections to congruency and similarity.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of non-Euclidean geometries and the historical development of the various geometries.
  5. Connect the ideas of algebra and geometry through the use of coordinate geometry, graphing, vectors, and motion geometry.
  6. Recognize measurement attributes and their effect on the choice of appropriate tools and units.
  7. Apply strategies, techniques, tools and formulas to determine measurements and their application in a variety of contexts.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of measurement and measurement systems.
  9. Employ estimation as a way of understanding measurement processes and units.
  10. Complete error analysis through determination of the reliability of numbers obtained from measurement.
  11. Understand and apply measurement conversion strategies.
  12. Apply geometric ideas and tools relating to the Pythagorean theorem, similar triangles, and trigonometry to solve problems.
  13. Use constructions, models, and dynamic geometric software to explore geometric relationships.
  14. Derive and explain formulas found in Euclidean geometry.
  15. Construct proofs using the axioms of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries.

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MTH 705 - Calculus I

Credits: 4

This course is the first semester of a calculus sequence dealing with applications and modeling of the differential and integral calculus. The course focuses on functions and their graphs, limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, the derivative and its uses in optimization and mathematical modeling, as well as the Fundamental Theorem. Throughout the course students are given opportunities to relate the mathematical concepts studied to the mathematical concepts they will be teaching. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course to explore and represent concepts.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 510 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 510G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 606G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 425, MATH 426.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Use mathematical modeling and the concepts of calculus to represent and solve problems from real-world contexts.
  2. Use technology to explore and represent fundamental concepts of calculus.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of calculus.
  4. Understand and describe the connection of calculus to middle and high school mathematics topics.
  5. Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of and procedural facility with basic calculus concepts including limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration. (Standard ~ 612.18 NH (8.a-e) ; Standard ~ 612.17 NH (8.a-e).

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MTH 706 - History of Mathematics

Credits: 4

This course addresses the historical development of major themes in mathematics, including calculation, numbers, geometry, algebra, infinity, and formalism in various civilizations ranging from the antiquity of Babylonia and Egypt through classical Greece, the Middle and Far East, and on to modern Europe. The course emphasizes how earlier civilizations influenced or failed to influence later ones and how the concepts evolved in these various civilizations.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 705 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 606G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 608G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 790.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Develop and strengthen their conceptual knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus through the study of why and how these concepts developed.
  2. Analyze how the development of mathematical concepts in different cultures influenced the development of those cultures and our present culture.
  3. Explore the influence of the development of mathematical concepts on other disciplines.
  4. Follow the development of mathematics from early number systems to the invention of calculus.
  5. Research historical questions and applications and present conclusions to others.

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MTH 707 - Calculus II

Credits: 4

This course is the second semester of a calculus sequence dealing with applications of differential and multivariable calculus. Topics include the calculus of transcendental functions, applications of integration, some differential equations, sequences and series, differentiation and integration of trigonometric functions multidimensional calculus with applications, and an introduction to multivariable calculus. Throughout the course students are given opportunities to relate the mathematical concepts studies to the mathematical concepts they will be teaching. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course to explore and represent concepts.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 705 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 606G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 607G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 426, MATH 527, MATH 528.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts of multivariable calculus. (Standard ~ 612.18 NH (8.f)

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MTH 708 - Discrete Mathematics

Credits: 4

This course is designed to introduce students to discrete and abstract mathematical topics. Topics include propositional and predicate logic; elementary set theory; introduction to proof techniques including mathematical induction; sets, relations, functions, and relations; recurrence relations, graph theory, as well as the properties of groups, rings, and fields. Students study number systems, mathematical induction, algorithms and complex number systems, matrix manipulation, combinatorics, graph theory, and finite differences. Course activities are based on secondary and middle school mathematics curricula. This course considers the basic objects of mathematics through real-world examples and the methods used to elucidate their properties.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 705 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 606G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 605G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. In the subject area of discrete mathematics, the candidate shall have the ability to: (a) Apply the fundamental ideas of discrete mathematics in the formulation and solution of problems arising from real-world situations (b) Use technology to solve problems involving the use of discrete structures
  2. In the subject area of discrete mathematics, the candidate shall demonstrate knowledge of: (a) Historical development of discrete mathematics (b) Basic elements of discrete mathematics, including but not limited to: (i) Graph theory (ii) Propositional logic (iii) Mathematical induction (iv) Recurrence relations (v) Finite differences (vi) Linear programming (vii) Combinatorics (Standard ~ 612.18 NH (9.a-b) ; Standard ~ 612.17 NH (9.a-b)

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MTH 709 - Topics in Linear and Abstract Algebra

Credits: 4

This course examines concepts in algebra including: patterns and functions, arithmetic sequences, geometric sequences, arithmetic and algebra of the integers, least common multiple and greater common divisor, inequalities, modular arithmetic and systems of numbers, properties of groups and fields, the field of complex numbers, polynomial arithmetic and algebra, linear equations. The course develops the mathematical structures, algebraic properties, and applications of matrices, determinants, vectors, vector spaces, systems of linear equations, and linear transformations. Students engage with these concepts through exploration, analysis, proof, and problem solving based on activities used in secondary and middle school mathematics. Throughout the course students are given opportunities to relate the mathematical concepts studied to the mathematical concepts they will be teaching.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 707 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 607G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): MATH 604G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken MATH 545.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a capacity to use physical materials and models to explore and explain the operations and properties of real and complex numbers with extensions to matrices and vectors.
  2. Identify and illustrate the mathematics underlying the theory of groups, rings, fields, and the relationships among them.
  3. Demonstrate a capacity to apply concepts of integer and rational exponents through modeling and applications. (Standard ~ 612.18 NH (4.h-j))
  4. Explain the distinctions among real numbers and their subsets with connection to field axioms.
  5. Demonstrate a capacity to apply the concepts of exponents, including integer and rational, through modeling and applications. (Standard ~ 612.17 NH (4.h-l))
  6. Model and analyze change and rates of change in various contexts.
  7. Use mathematical models to understand, represent, and communicate quantitative relationships, including, but not limited to equality, equations, inequalities, and proportional relationships.
  8. Explore, analyze, and generalize a wide variety of patterns and functions using multiple representations including tables, graphs, written word, and symbolic rules.
  9. Represent information to solve problems using matrices.
  10. Using graphing utilities and other technological tools to represent, explain, and explore algebraic ideas including functions, equations, and expressions
  11. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of algebra.
  12. Generalize patterns and functions using recursive and explicit representations.
  13. Articulate the meaning of functions and their inverse relationships, both formally and informally, with the use of concrete materials and graphing utilities
  14. Understand and compare the properties of classes of functions and their inverses, including exponential, polynomial, rational, step, absolute value, root, logarithmic, and periodic, including trigonometric.
  15. Understand and apply major concepts of: a. Linear algebra, including vector spaces and matrices; and b. Abstract algebra, including groups, rings, and fields
  16. Connect major concepts of linear and abstract algebra to the complex number system and other mathematical structures.
  17. Understand, identify, and apply arithmetic and geometric sequences, including partial sums of infinite arithmetic and geometric sequences, with connections to linear and exponential functions. (Standard ~ 612.18 NH (6.a-l) ; Standard ~ 612.17 NH (6.a-l)

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MTH 710 - Algebra Theory for Middle School Teachers

Credits: 4

This course will examine concepts in algebra including patterns and functions, arithmetic sequences, geometric sequences, arithmetic and algebra of the integers, least common multiple and greatest common divisor, inequalities, modular arithmetic and systems of numbers, basic properties of groups and fields, and polynomial arithmetic and algebra. This course will develop mathematical structures, algebraic properties, and applications of matrices. Students will engage with these concepts through exploration, analysis, proof, and problem solving based on activities used in middle school mathematics. Throughout the course students will be given opportunities to relate the mathematical concepts studied to the mathematical concepts they will be teaching.

Prerequisite(s): (MTH 402 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (MTH 705 with a minimum grade of D- or MATH 606G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): MATH 609G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a capacity to use physical materials and models to explore and explain the operations and properties of real and complex numbers with extensions to matrices and vectors. (a) Represent, use, and apply introductory concepts and properties of complex numbers. (b) Identify and illustrate the mathematics that underlies the procedures used for operations involving real numbers and their subsets. (c) explain the distinctions among real numbers and their subsets with connection to field axioms. (d) Demonstrate a capacity to apply the concepts of exponents, including integer and rational, through modeling and applications. (e) Connect the ideas of algebra and geometry through the use of coordinate geometry, graphing, vectors, and motion geometry. (f) Model and analyze change and rates of change in various contexts. (g) use mathematical models to understand, Represent, and communicate quantitative relationships, including, but not limited to equality, equations, inequalities, and proportional relationships. (h) explore, analyze, and generalize a wide variety of patterns and functions using multiple representations including tables, graphs, written word, and symbolic rules. (i) Represent information and solve problems using matrices. (j) use graphing utilities and other technological tools to Represent, explain, and explore algebraic ideas including functions, equations, and expressions (k) Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of algebra (l) generalize patterns and functions using recursive and explicit representations (m) understand, Identify, and apply arithmetic and geometric sequences (n) Articulate the meaning of functions and their inverse relationships, both formally and informally, with the use of concrete materials and graphing utilities (o) understand and compare the properties of classes of functions and their inverses, including exponential, polynomial, rational, step, absolute value, root, logarithmic, and periodic, including trigonometric (p) Represent and analyze group and field properties of real numbers and other mathematical structures

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MTH 744 - Special Topics: Upper Level

Credits: 1-4

A study of current and variable topics in mathematics. Course content will change from term to term.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to unlimited times.

Equivalent(s): MATH 644G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

Psychology (PSY)

PSY 410 - Introduction to Psychology

Credits: 4

This survey course provides an introduction to the science of psychology. It examines many of the major areas of applied and experimental psychology. A selection of topics from the following specialty areas are covered: History of Psychology, Research Methods, Biological Psychology, Cognition, Learning, Memory, Human Development, Stress, Emotion, Health Psychology, Personality Theories, Psychopathology, and Social Psychology. Students will apply knowledge of these topics to interpret personal experiences, current events, societal issues, and practical problems.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed); Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): PSY 501G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 401.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Recognize aspects of the scientific nature of psychology, including its methods, history, and/or ethics and describe how science is used in the research and clinical practice of psychology.
  2. Identify the basic components and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and recognize the role of biological function in mental processing.
  3. Describe cognitive processes and the roles of these mechanisms in human thought and/or problem solving.
  4. Identify the sociocultural contexts and major theories of human development.
  5. State the major theories of personality and abnormal psychology as well as identify the role of theories in the definition and treatments of mental health (e.g., stress, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, etc.).
  6. Conduct scholarly research using library resources to locate appropriate sources and incorporate these sources into an applied project.
  7. Develop skills in scientific writing, American Psychological Association (APA) formatting, and effective communication.
  8. Connect psychological theories to everyday events and personal experiences.

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PSY 470 - Child Development

Credits: 4

This course focuses on the development of children from birth to early adolescence. It includes the major developmental theories and perspectives as well as an overview of the research methodology used in the field. Through reflective writing, current research in the areas of physical, cognitive, and social and emotional development is explored in the context of the child's environment.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Equivalent(s): PSY 508G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 581.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Identify and explain three major issues addressed by developmental theories, e.g., the role of biology vs. the environment, the nature of change (qualitative vs. quantitative), and the role of the individuals in their own development (active vs. passive).
  2. Compare and contrast the world views from which developmental theories arise.
  3. Identify major developmental theories including ethological, psychoanalytic, psychosocial, behavioristic, social learning, and cognitive theories and compare them in light of their basic principles and tenets.
  4. Differentiate between the major research methods and techniques employed in the study of development.
  5. Identify and describe the major milestones in the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of infants and children.
  6. Summarize current research findings on factors that impact development, e.g., genetics, nutrition, environmental stimulation, and human interaction.
  7. Analyze the dynamic interaction between biological, psychological, sociocultural, and ecological factors and explain how they affect development.
  8. Apply knowledge of child development in making recommendations for enhancing development in various situations (e.g., family, child care, education, community).
  9. Critically reflect on best practices to promote children's development.
  10. Demonstrate reflective learning skills and professional growth in the NAEYC Standards through a written assignment.

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PSY 480 - Infant and Toddler Development

Credits: 4

This course focuses on major theoretical perspectives of child development with particular attention to infant and toddler development. Topics include the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive milestones of the growing child along with factors that contribute to optimal development. There is an emphasis on the importance of creating high quality, safe, and supportive environments as well as on attachment and the role of communication in the development of trust and autonomy. Students observe children to develop strategies for creating and maintaining developmentally appropriate environments. Prior completion of PSY 525 or PSY 470 recommended.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Equivalent(s): PSY 510G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and explain major theories and basic principles of infant and toddler development.
  2. Compare and contrast biological and environmental factors that influence development.
  3. Articulate the major physical, cognitive, and social milestones of infant and toddler development.
  4. Discuss the significance of the development of attachments and trust in infants, explain factors that influence the development of attachment, and develop examples of environments and interactions that are likely to promote secure attachments.
  5. Describe the sensorimotor orientation of infants and toddlers and explain how it is their primary path for learning.
  6. Observe and record the physical, cognitive, and social development of an infant and a toddler and evaluate the quality of the environment for promoting development in these domains.
  7. Analyze the research regarding the significance of the development of autonomy in toddlers.
  8. Apply principles of development in the design of a physical environment which will maximize freedom to explore and learn.
  9. Identify and share appropriate resources to support parents of infants and toddlers.
  10. Critically reflect on best practices to promote children's development.

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PSY 525 - Human Development

Credits: 4

This course focuses on the development of the individual from conception to death. Major developmental theories, milestones, processes, and influences are covered. Research findings about these topics are examined. Growth and development are viewed as products of interacting biological, psychological, and social factors. The risks and opportunities in the developing person's social environment, as well as the application of theories and research findings, are emphasized.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed); Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): PSY 509G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the major psychological theoretical perspectives of human development.
  2. Compare the basic assumptions and concepts of the major developmental theories.
  3. Identify and explain the major milestones in physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development occurring in each period throughout the lifespan.
  4. Discuss the dynamic interaction among biological, psychological, and social factors and their contribution to development.
  5. Describe and analyze the development and behavior of specific individuals using the perspectives of developmental theories and research findings.
  6. Discuss the ethical considerations and parameters that guide the conduct of research and govern the use of research results in the field of human development.

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PSY 530 - Social Psychology

Credits: 4

Social Psychology is the scientific study of how individuals, groups, organizations, and culture influence and are influenced by their social environment. This course provides an overview of classic and contemporary work in this field and explores topics such as aggression, attitude formation and change, social thinking, individual and group influence, prejudice, friendships and romantic relationships, leadership, social influence, altruism, and/or conformity.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Equivalent(s): PSY 502G, PSY 608G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 552.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Explore how social environmental variables impact behavior, belief systems, and affect.
  2. Describe factors influencing perceptions and beliefs about other people and ourselves, and the impact of these factors on behavior.
  3. Examine attitude formation and change, persuasion, social influence, and ways to resist persuasion and influence.
  4. Explore the development of prejudice, discrimination, interpersonal conflict, and aggression.
  5. Explain the influence of groups on decision-making and performance.

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PSY 550 - Fundamentals of Applied Behavior Analysis

Credits: 4

This course serves as an introduction to the foundational concepts and principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) with an emphasis on the skills from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s (BACB) Registered Behavior Technician (RBT) Task List. It provides students with the opportunity to examine how the principles of basic measurement, assessment, skill acquisition, behavior reduction, and professional conduct are applied in ABA settings. Students will also review the development and history of applied behavior analysis.

Prerequisite(s): (PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D-) and (IDIS 560 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 501G with a minimum grade of D-).

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain how to conduct continuous and discontinuous measurement procedures with data collection.
  2. Illustrate how to conduct a preference assessment and use the results to increase a client’s motivation for participation in programming.
  3. Describe basic skill acquisition programming, including discrete trial training, natural environment training, and others.
  4. Explain strategies for developing new behaviors, such as chaining, shaping, prompting, and reinforcement.
  5. Identify and define the elements of a behavior reduction plan.
  6. Define and describe basic behavioral principles, such as reinforcement, punishment, and extinction.
  7. Apply the Registered Behavior Technician (RBT) ethical guidelines to sample case scenarios.

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PSY 565 - Core Principles of Addiction

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the basic issues discussed by addiction support workers, including the Twelve Core Functions of the alcohol and other drug (AOD) counselor. Students will also have an opportunity to explore the possible professional certifications (e.g., Certified Recovery Support Worker (CRSW), Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LADC), etc.) within this career. A wide array of topics related to addiction may be discussed in this beginning-level course. Topics may include the economic, political, and/or cultural consequences of addiction and potential consequences of addiction on the individual’s relationships, mental health, and physical health.

Equivalent(s): PSY 515G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Name and discuss the Twelve Core Functions of Addiction Counselors.
  2. Describe and differentiate among the types of addictions-related professions.
  3. Formulate an inclusive definition of substance use disorders.
  4. Explain the impact of addiction on the individual, family systems, communities, and/or society.

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PSY 602 - Theories of Personality

Credits: 4

This course examines specific theories of personality for the purpose of explaining normal and abnormal development and behavior. Psychoanalytic, trait, humanistic, existential, cognitive, behavioral, and social learning theories, among others, are reviewed and critiqued based on research evidence. Each theory or theoretical perspective is presented in terms of historical context, basic assumptions, and hypothetical constructs. Students explore behaviors and motivations from the perspective of different personality theories. The application of personality theories in helping-profession contexts is introduced.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 602G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 553.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Examine and articulate the role of theory and the scientific method to organize, test, and predict various aspects of personality.
  2. Distinguish between personality assessment and personality research.
  3. Describe and differentiate the historical context, basic assumptions, and hypothetical constructs of each theory considered.
  4. Apply contemporary theories to explain normal and abnormal behavior.
  5. Demonstrate how therapeutic methods that stem from each theory are applied to improve an individual's understanding of self and others.

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PSY 603 - Crisis Intervention

Credits: 4

This course focuses on crisis theory, methods of crisis intervention, and specific crises that occur with individuals and families such as suicide, unemployment, natural disasters, illness, divorce, and death. Students are expected throughout the course to apply their exploration of theory to their work and life experiences.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D- or SOCI 410 with a minimum grade of D- or SOC 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 603G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Differentiate between maturational, situational, and sociocultural crises.
  2. Define a crisis state, identify the crisis origins, and analyze whether the primary contributors are situational, sociocultural, or maturational.
  3. Explain the phases of a crisis event.
  4. Describe crisis intervention techniques and methods and differentiate them from other forms of psychotherapy.
  5. Apply crisis planning to a case example with reference to its origins and its crisis manifestations.
  6. Compare and contrast a healthy grieving process and an incomplete or maladaptive one.
  7. Differentiate between self-destructive and suicidal behaviors and recognize when professional mental health treatment is needed.
  8. Discuss the impact of violence or other trauma on vulnerable individuals.
  9. Examine and evaluate the crisis plan of a social institution or a business in light of the research in the field.

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PSY 620 - Behavioral Assessments and Interventions in Applied Behavior Analysis I

Credits: 4

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply basic knowledge of assessments and use assessment results to inform intervention plans. Students will learn about various assessments used to address maladaptive behaviors, as well as skill development for replacement behaviors. Research methods for summarizing and analyzing data and single-subject experimental designs will also be studied.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 550 with a minimum grade of D-.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Define and describe methods of assessment for client behaviors and skills.
  2. Determine which assessment methods should be employed based on the context of client needs.
  3. Develop analyses of outcomes from client behavioral assessments.
  4. Determine appropriate replacement behaviors based on client assessment outcomes.
  5. Accurately interpret behavior analysis data in graphical form to identify trends, causes, and effects relevant to client needs.
  6. Employ single-subject experimental designs to evaluate behavioral interventions.

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PSY 626 - Educational Psychology

Credits: 4

This course focuses on the study of teaching and learning, including several theoretical perspectives specific to human and cognitive development. Course topics include motivation, critical thinking, student assessment and achievement, and implications of approaches to each. The course critically examines the relationship between research and education, including the contributions and limitations of measurement in instructional settings and the interplay with educational policy.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): (IDIS 560 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 501G with a minimum grade of D-) and (EDC 500 with a minimum grade of D- or EDU 510G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 525 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 509G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): PSY 606G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Articulate the role of the teacher in the teaching/learning environment.
  2. Apply principles of cognitive theory in teaching strategies.
  3. Utilize instructional theory in the development, implementation, and delivery of instructional material.
  4. Develop specific classroom management strategies.
  5. Develop various motivational strategies and describe characteristics of the students who would benefit most from them.
  6. Discuss individual differences, including those related to ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, and exceptionality, in the teaching/learning environment.
  7. Develop specific assessment strategies and measurement instruments for assessing student learning.
  8. Interpret standardized tests accurately and demonstrate effective reporting of the information to parents and school officials.

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PSY 630 - Psychology of Adulthood

Credits: 4

This course is a life-span developmental approach to adulthood in contemporary American society that includes the major theoretical perspectives regarding developmental transitions and age-related tasks. The following topics are included: 1) methodological issues related to the study of development, 2) patterns of stability and change across adulthood with regard to processes such as biological functioning, sensation and perception, cognition, personality, identity, gender and social roles, relationships, career, and mental health, and 3) death and dying as the final stage of life. Students can consider their own development in light of this content.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 615G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and explain the major issues and controversies concerning the nature of adult development and aging.
  2. Articulate the developmental process from the perspectives of the traditional theoretical models, e.g., biological, psychoanalytic, psychosocial, cognitive, and personality theories.
  3. Compare and contrast traditional perspectives with more recently developed perspectives.
  4. Describe changes in the biological, perceptual, and cognitive processes associated with age.
  5. Describe the research regarding age-related change/stability in identity and personality.
  6. Examine the social processes associated with adulthood, for example, intimacy, marriage, sexuality, career choice/adjustment, parenting, divorce, retirement, and widowhood.
  7. Analyze the perspectives and processes related to gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.
  8. Relate theories and research on the psychology of adulthood to one's own psychological processes and development, explaining which perspectives are useful in understanding oneself.
  9. Discuss death and dying as the final stage of life.

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PSY 646 - Psychology of Occupational Stress

Credits: 4

This course focuses on occupational stress research, including the identification of organizational and psychosocial sources of stress. It defines workplace stress and eustress and explores factors including work environments, stress perception, diversity stress, personality, and interpersonal relationships with managers, staff, and co-workers. This course evaluates measurement tools, prevention and remediation strategies for individuals and organizations, and other approaches that create healthy workplaces. Each area is examined from the individual worker's perspective and that of management. Learners apply the major theoretical principles and processes to their own experiences as employees, employers, or military personnel.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 410 with a minimum grade of D- or CRIM 500G with a minimum grade of D- or ECO 470 with a minimum grade of D- or ECO 512G with a minimum grade of D- or MGMT 410 with a minimum grade of D- or MGMT 500G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 525 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 509G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 502G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 530 with a minimum grade of D- or SOCI 410 with a minimum grade of D- or SOC 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 616G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify characteristics of healthy workplaces and discuss how “stess” and “eustress” apply to the occupational field of study.
  2. Summarize the current research to understand the relationships among psychosocial environments, physical enviroments, organizational structures, personality types, and workplace stress.
  3. Recognize individual reactions, both positive and negative, to workplace stress and compare best-practice approaches for both individuals and orgranizations to mitigate negative and promote positive outcomes.
  4. Examine the dynamics and root causes of “diversity stress” and investigate inclusive initiatives that have proven effective.
  5. Differentitiate the role of government, private industry, unions, and the individual in developing and implementing social policy pertaining to work conditions in the United States and other countries.
  6. Integrate theoretical findings and personal observations to develop a program for promoting workplace health and reducing stress in a specific work organization.

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PSY 654 - Counseling Theories

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of counseling theories developed by major theorists. The course examines how both the historical context and the scientific knowledge of the time helped to shape the theories developed during the past century. Research findings evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic modalities are reviewed. Important elements of the counseling process, which include assessments, confidentiality, the therapeutic alliance, and the impact of funding sources on decision making, are examined.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 604G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

View Course Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify the key elements characteristic of a formal counseling relationship.
  2. Identify the key concepts of major theories and illustrate how they correspond to their developed techniques.
  3. Describe an assessment process used to establish a working diagnosis.
  4. Compare and contrast how several theorists would evaluate a case study.
  5. Analyze research findings evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic modalities.
  6. Examine several ethical dilemmas that counselors may encounter.
  7. Describe how counselors frequently have to manage the conflicting requests of the individual client, the family system, and outside influences.
  8. Illustrate how the counselor needs to develop an effective level of self-knowledge to be able to make good use of this asset in the counseling process.

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PSY 660 - Ethics in Applied Behavior Analysis

Credits: 4

This course reviews ethical standards of practice within the field of applied behavior analysis and how these standards are used within applied settings. This course will also address preparing practitioners for supervisory responsibilities. Students will have the opportunity to propose methods for applying the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board in a variety of practical client situations.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 550 with a minimum grade of D-.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Identify examples of ethical and non-ethical situations in ABA settings according to the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct.
  2. Propose appropriate responses to potential signals of assent and withdrawn assent.
  3. Illustrate how ABA professionals can respond to different ethical dilemmas according to the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct.
  4. Analyze methods of ethical professional conduct with clients from multiple cultural backgrounds.
  5. Evaluate the responsibility to benefit clients in ABA settings according to the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct.

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PSY 665 - Principles of Assessment

Credits: 4

This course is a survey of assessment issues and methods for students pursuing studies in education-related fields or the behavioral sciences. Topics include differences between formal and informal assessment and evaluation, reliability and validity, differences between norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests, development of assessment and evaluation instruments and plans, methods for observing and recording behavior, and how to use assessment information to develop and/or modify programs and environments. NOTE: MTH 402 or MTH 504 is recommended.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 470 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 508G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 605G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Discuss the meaning and uses of assessment in various fields.
  2. Explain the differences between objective and subjective assessments and evaluations.
  3. Compare and contrast the psychometric properties of assessment instruments, i.e., objectivity, reliability, and validity, and how they influence the interpretation of assessment data.
  4. Explain basic statistical concepts used in testing, including measures of central tendency and variability (e.g., mean, median, mode, range, and standard deviation).
  5. Compare and contrast norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests, including an explanation of normative data (e.g., normal curve, percentiles, z-scores, T-scores, and stanines), and discuss appropriate uses of each.
  6. Describe various types of observational methodology and the usefulness of each.
  7. Discuss how information from both formal and informal assessment measures can be used to plan individualized programs.
  8. Explain the importance of multifaceted approaches to both formative and summative evaluation with particular attention to the relationship of outcomes to assessment and evaluation.

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PSY 675 - Foundations of Addictions Counseling

Credits: 4

This course provides students with an opportunity to study the important theories, strategies, and skills of addictions-related counseling. Topics are derived from the Twelve Core Functions of Addiction Counselors and will include concepts like screening, referral, intake, assessment, crisis management, treatment, recovery, support, and/or client education.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 565 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 515G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 625G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Explain the key elements involved in the therapeutic treatment of clients.
  2. Describe theories that inform the techniques employed by addictions counselors.
  3. Identify techniques used throughout the continuum of care.
  4. Develop strategies for working with individuals, families, and groups.
  5. Evaluate the effectiveness of treatment methods and modalities.
  6. Examine unique ethical dilemmas that counselors may encounter in addiction-related situations.

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PSY 685 - Principles of Psychopathology

Credits: 4

The focus of this course is on the societal definitions and impact of abnormal and deviant behavior, and what is considered psychopathology. It examines both how mental illness is recognized and regarded, and how its treatment may vary, in different societies and cultures. It deals with major disorders and personality syndromes considered to be abnormal or deviant and examines the various etiologic factors known or believed to play a role in each of the disorders, considering them from varying perspectives, such as psychoanalytic, cognitive behavioral, biological, and humanistic.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 617G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 561.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Compare and contrast historical and contemporary conceptions of abnormal and deviant behavior.
  2. Describe different theories used to explain major psychological disorders.
  3. Compare and contrast therapeutic interventions for psychological disorders.
  4. Examine varying philosophical and cultural perspectives of psychological disorders and how those perspectives inform treatment.

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PSY 710 - The Biology of Addiction

Credits: 4

This course introduces the biological mechanisms of substance use and misuse (e.g., nervous system activity, tolerance, withdrawal, and metabolism) and the resulting behavioral and health consequences. Students will also examine the classification of various substances, epidemiological data and trends, the diagnoses and diagnostic criteria of substance use disorders, genetic and biological influences on addiction, and biological theories of addiction. Other potential topics include behavioral addictions (e.g., gambling, eating, video games, or sex) and the effects of drugs on individuals, families, and society.

Attributes: Phys Natural World (Gen Ed)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 410 with a minimum grade of D- or PSY 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 610G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 733.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Describe the key aspects of physiology, neurotransmission, and brain anatomy.
  2. Analyze the impact of functional changes to physiology, neurotransmission, and brain anatomy on the development of addiction.
  3. Identify the mechanisms and classification of specific substances used recreationally and medicinally.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the genetic and biological influences on addiction.
  5. Critically evaluate the biological theories of addiction and explain how these views may impact stigma, treatment, and recovery.
  6. Apply an understanding of the biological mechanisms of addiction to interpret personal experiences and real-world events.

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PSY 720 - Behavioral Assessments and Interventions in Applied Behavior Analysis II

Credits: 4

This course extends the student’s initial inquiry into behavioral assessments and interventions beyond the prerequisite course to practice advanced techniques. Students will appraise the needs of case-based situations, then select intervention strategies inclusive of shaping, discrimination training, instructional control, imitation training, and differential reinforcement. Behavior change will be addressed across settings and populations.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 620 with a minimum grade of D-.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Analyze behavioral assessment data to inform behavior procedures.
  2. Interpret behavioral assessment data analyses to determine the functions of behavior.
  3. Assemble comprehensive behavior support plans using skills learned in the course.
  4. Apply methods of differential reinforcement in appropriate hypothetical scenarios.
  5. Propose appropriate evidence-based behavior change programming based on a client profile.
  6. Apply methods of establishing and maintaining instructional control in appropriate hypothetical scenarios.

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PSY 725 - Cognitive Psychology

Credits: 4

This course introduces some of the major topics related to human cognition, including perception, attention, memory, knowledge acquisition, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making. Students will explore the historical context, current theories, neurobiological underpinnings, research methods, and empirical research relevant to the field of cognitive psychology. Comprehension will be enhanced through the application of cognitive principles to understand everyday behavior and solve practical problems.

Attributes: HumanBehavSocial Sys (Gen Ed); Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): IDIS 560 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 609G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 513.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Analyze the major topics within the study of cognitive psychology to demonstrate an understanding of current theoretical perspectives.
  2. Identify and critically evaluate the research methods used in the relevant empirical research within cognitive psychology.
  3. Conduct scholarly research using library resources to locate peer-reviewed sources and incorporate these sources into an applied project.
  4. Develop skills in scientific writing, American Psychological Association (APA) formatting, and effective communication.
  5. Connect cognitive principles to everyday events and personal experiences.
  6. Apply specific cognitive principles to address a practical problem.

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PSY 740 - Biopsychology

Credits: 4

This course addresses the relationship between the brain and behavior to provide an overview of the biological basis of thoughts, actions, and feelings. Topics may include basic functional neuroanatomy and physiology, sleeping and dreaming, emotion, biopsychological research methods, learning and memory, development of the brain, sensation and perception, motor control, language and lateralization, substance use and neuropharmacology, emotion, and behavioral health problems (for example, stress-related disorders, anxiety, depression, or schizophrenia) and their pharmacological treatment. Comprehension will be enhanced through the application of biopsychological principles to understand everyday behavior and solve practical problems. NOTE: SCI 490 recommended.

Attributes: Phys Natural World (Gen Ed); Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): IDIS 560 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 501G with a minimum grade of D-.

Equivalent(s): PSY 601G, SCI 600G

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PSYC 531.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Identify the structures and functions of a neuron and regions of the brain.
  2. Explain the role of specific brain regions in producing basic functions such as eating, drinking, sex, sleep, and/or emotions.
  3. Explain the role of specific brain regions in producing higher-level functions such as addiction, sensation and perception, learning and memory, language and cognition, and/or lateralization.
  4. Describe the dynamic interactions among evolution, genetics, neuroplasticity (neural networks, apoptosis, etc.), environment, and/or behavior across the lifespan (prenatal to death).
  5. Analyze the biopsychological basis of contemporary behavioral health problems such as stress, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and/or violence as well as the biology-based treatments of these behavioral health problems.
  6. Conduct scholarly research using library resources to locate peer-reviewed sources relevant to specific topics in biopsychology.
  7. Connect biopsychological principles to everyday events and personal experiences.

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PSY 795 - Integrative Capstone: Internship in Applied Psychology

Credits: 4

This capstone course is a field-based internship designed to develop and hone the practical application skills of an Applied Psychology major. The course requires students to integrate the knowledge and skills gained from other courses in the program and to demonstrate the ability to apply their knowledge to new subject matter and practical situations. Students apply for an internship at a self-selected site and negotiate the terms of the internship experience with a site supervisor under the auspices of their faculty mentor. The internship requires documented evidence of eighty hours of supervised experience and practice in a field setting where psychology-related knowledge and skills are applied. NOTE: Registration for this course, an internship, is by permission of Academic Affairs. Early registration deadlines may apply. Prior to capstone enrollment, students are expected to complete the majority of their required major courses. Students should consult with their advisor regarding specific major courses that may be completed with their capstone. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): (CRIT 602 with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 602G with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (IDIS 601 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 601G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): BEHS 651G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Complete an in-depth, supervised experience in a field setting that is related to Applied Psychology and reflective of the student’s professional development.
  2. Apply knowledge of systems, operations, and roles fundamental to the field in the context of an individually developed project that includes evidence-based sources of information.
  3. Apply discipline knowledge, skills, and methods to a specific field setting, client population, or service clientele.
  4. Demonstrate professionalism and standards of ethics while working in a field setting.
  5. Clearly and professionally communicate all aspects of the project, including the student's reflections on the integration of knowledge achieved through the completion of the internship.

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PSY 797 - Integrative Capstone: Project in Applied Psychology

Credits: 4

This capstone course in applied psychology requires students to integrate the knowledge and skills gained from other courses in the program and to demonstrate the ability to apply their knowledge to new subject matter and practical situations. Students will complete an independent project that requires conducting scholarly research on a chosen topic, critically evaluating the relevant literature, and synthesizing peer-reviewed sources into a scientific paper that conforms to APA formatting standards. Students will become familiar with the APA ethical standards regarding human research, and students choosing to conduct an empirical study collecting data from human participants will be required to undergo a review and approval process by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Prior to capstone enrollment, students are expected to complete the majority of their required major courses. Students should consult with their advisor regarding specific major courses that may be completed with their capstone. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Prerequisite(s): (CRIT 602 with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 602G with a minimum grade of D- or CRIT 502G with a minimum grade of D-) and (IDIS 601 with a minimum grade of D- or IDIS 601G with a minimum grade of D-).

Equivalent(s): BEHS 650G

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

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  1. Write an APA style literature review or research report on a topic within psychology that fully examines, critically evaluates, and synthesizes current theory and research and generates a new understanding of the subject matter.
  2. Conduct scholarly research using library resources to locate evidence-based, peer-reviewed sources and incorporate these sources into the capstone project.
  3. Demonstrate skills in scientific writing and use of American Psychological Association (APA) formatting.
  4. Integrate prior course work with new information gathered through the literature search and expand the breadth and depth of existing knowledge and skills.
  5. Evaluate relevant behavioral concepts, constructs, and theories and express these findings in ways appropriate for different audiences. For projects that involve collecting data from human participants, establish conceptual and operational definitions for behavioral variables relevant to the research topic.
  6. Clearly and professionally communicate all aspects of the project, including its nature, theoretical foundations, conclusions, and the student's reflections on the integration of knowledge achieved through the completion of the project.
  7. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the American Psychological Association's ethical standards for researchers, and for all research activities involving human participants, follow college policy requiring review and written approval by the College’s Institutional Review Board prior to data collection.

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