Skills (LAW) (LSK)

LSK #852 - Graduate Programs Externship

Credits: 4

Residential LL.M. and Master’s candidates with an “Honors” average or better at the end of their first semester and who have completed in-school coursework may be eligible for a legal externship. Students may perform their legal externship in government agencies, law firms, nonprofit organizations, or corporations. The duration of an externship is usually 6-8 weeks. Students must meet with the Director of Graduate Programs Skills or her designee in the semester prior to enrolling in an externship, and all externships must be approved by the Director or her designee. The subject matter of the externship must relate to the student’s academic program at UNH Law. UNH School of Law will provide some assistance in securing an externship but cannot guarantee a placement. Students will complete weekly reports during the externship.

LSK 900 - Legal Research and Information Literacy

Credits: 2

Taught in context, each topical section (Patent, Copyright/trademark, Social Justice, Traditional Practice) provides first year students an introduction to basic U. S. research tools and strategies including hierarchy of authority and primary and secondary sources of law. Students learn to develop coherent research strategies to locate information in line with information literacy frameworks. In additional to a graded research midterm and final, students must successfully complete 10 weekly research assignments and two research practicums.

LSK 901 - Advanced Legal Research

Credits: 2

Advanced Legal Research is a survey of basic and advanced legal research tools and strategies for students to be efficient and cost-effective researchers, no matter what area of law will be practiced. Legal Practice technology will be incorporated into the curriculum along with various research tools to be explored, evaluated and compared. This course will utilize a mix of techniques including lecture, active learning activities, hands on techniques, and evaluation/comparison. Students will be evaluated throughout the semester with a culminating final assessment.

LSK 903 - Advanced Trial Advocacy

Credits: 3

Students compete in one of two national trial advocacy competitions during the late winter. You will intensively prepare and conduct a trial with experienced coaches. One regional competition is held in mid-February and the other in late February. National finals (if a team advances) are held one month later. Practice rounds are held before a variety of local judges. UNH Law competes against trial teams from law schools throughout New England. Eligibility: 2Ls and 3Ls. Prerequisites: Evidence & Trial Advocacy. Instructor permission required to enroll. Course enrollment:12 students. Course format: competition. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. No S/U grade.

LSK 907 - Legal Residency

Credits: 4

During a legal residency, students apply classroom knowledge in real-world legal setting by working under the supervision of attorneys and other professionals. Throughout the residency semester, students build skills, personal characteristics, and professional competencies essential to success. Students work in a variety of settings including in state and local government agencies, law firms, judicial chambers, non-profit organizations, or corporations.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

LSK 919 - Legal Analysis and Writing 1

Credits: 2

This course introduces the fundamental analytical and writing skills used by practicing lawyers. Students learn how to: 1) Read, comprehend, analyze, and synthesize legal issues and authorities; 2) Apply facts to legal issues and authorities; 3) Organize coherent predictive analysis using conventional legal structure and format; 4) Understand and accurately use legal citation; 5) Write clearly and concisely; and 6) Participate as a professional in all stages of the writing process. Students research, write, and format several objective interoffice memos of varying lengths over the course of the semester.

LSK 920 - Legal Analysis and Writing 2

Credits: 3

This course builds upon and reinforces the goals of Legal Analysis and Writing I, adding persuasive writing and speaking. Lawyers need to be persuasive in their written words and when speaking with others. In addition to practicing and achieving higher proficiency in the six goals for Legal Analysis and Writing I, in successfully completing this course, students learn how to: 1) Organize coherent persuasive analysis using conventional legal structure and format; and 2) Prepare and present an oral argument. In this course, students write a persuasive memo to a trial court, completing a graded outline, first draft, and final brief. Students then prepare and present an oral argument to outside judges in a courtroom setting.

LSK 924 - Negotiations Workshop

Credits: 2

In this 10 week interactive workshop, students will identify and learn different theories and types of negotiations. Negotiating effectively is important in any profession, but it is critical for attorneys to sharpen and hone these skills for the benefit of clients. Negotiations occur at all levels of an attorney's practice, whether that practice is in a small firm environment, in litigation, in a corporate setting, or working with a governmental entity. Students will apply their negotiation skills to a variety of situations. Negotiations will occur in two, three or multi-party settings. Class time will be divided between discussion of selected readings, interactive negotiations, and guest attorneys who will discuss some of their own negotiated agreements. Class attendance and participation is mandatory. "Getting to Yes," Fisher, Ury, & Patton, and "Getting Past No," Ury will be required and any additional books required will be posted before the class. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. Course enrollment is limited to 18 students. Course format: simulation. This course may be taken for a grade or an S/U grade.

LSK 928 - Trial Advocacy

Credits: 3

Sections of this course are taught by judges and experienced trial attorneys. This course provides a foundation for the development of the variety of skills necessary for effective trial advocacy no matter what the forum. Development of a theory of a case, file organization and pretrial preparation are emphasized, as well as the more traditional oral trial skills such as closing argument and cross-examination. Students regularly participate in exercises simulating segments of civil and criminal trials. Eligibility: Open to 2Ls and 3Ls. Corequisites: Evidence. Course enrollment is limited to 12 students. Course format: simulation. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.

LSK 934 - Legal Residency

Credits: 11

During a legal residency, students apply classroom knowledge in real-world legal setting by working under the supervision of attorneys and other professionals. Throughout the residency semester, students build skills, personal characteristics, and professional competencies essential to success. Students work in a variety of settings including in state and local government agencies, law firms, judicial chambers, non-profit organizations, or corporations.

LSK 940 - Moot Court Board Advisory

Credits: 1

Moot Court Advisory Board members are typically third year students, selected by the outgoing Moot Court Board during the Spring semester. Board members are responsible for organizing, coaching, and developing the moot court program from year to year. The class is a year-long commitment. Moot Court Board Members select the upcoming year's moot court competitors and determine the teams. Each Board Member coaches a team, often for the same competition that the Board Member competed in during the prior year. The coach supports the team’s writing of the competition brief; provides feedback as competition rules allow; organizes and conducts rigorous oral argument practice for competition preparation; communicates with the board's Chief Justice about team progress/needs; works with law school staff to register the team and develop travel plans. Board Members organize the intramural competition in the Fall Semester and assist the Chief Justice of the Board in any additional duties. Board Members use their leadership, organizational, and analytical skills to continually improve this student run advocacy program.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

LSK 943 - Appellate Advocacy

Credits: 2

This course fulfills the upper level writing requirement. Appellate Advocacy is a writing intensive course designed to teach the different components of appellate brief writing, as well as effective appellate oral advocacy. One or two case problems (depending upon the particular professor) are assigned throughout the semester, modeled after actual court cases. Students will be taught how to master the facts of a case, the rule of law applicable to the particular legal problem, and the policy underpinning the rule of law. Paramount goals of the course include professionalism and instructing students on clear, persuasive, organized, and strategic written and oral communication skills necessary for effective legal advocacy. While AA focuses on the appellate practice setting, the written and oral advocacy skills students will acquire are applicable to all settings of legal practice. Grading will be based on one or two appellate briefs, oral arguments, meaningful class participation and other assignments. Eligibility: Open to 2Ls and 3Ls. Prerequisites: Legal Writing & Analysis I and II; Legal Research & Information Literacy. Course enrollment is limited to 12 students. Course format: writing. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.

LSK 945 - Judicial Opinion Drafting

Credits: 2

This course is designed to appeal to students planning to either participate in a legal residency with a judge or to enter the market for a judicial clerkship. Students critically discuss the theories of case resolution articulated and applied by prominent jurists, develop their own theories of case resolution, identify and consider the varying audiences for trial and appellate court orders and opinions in both the state and federal court systems, and draft and polish a well-written and principled opinion that they can use as a writing sample when applying for a legal residency position or a judicial clerkship.

LSK 948 - Legal Residency

Credits: 6

During a legal residency, students apply classroom knowledge in real-world legal setting by working under the supervision of attorneys and other professionals. Throughout the residency semester, students build skills, personal characteristics, and professional competencies essential to success. Students work in a variety of settings including in state and local government agencies, law firms, judicial chambers, non-profit organizations, or corporations.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

LSK 949 - Legal Residency Class

Credits: 1

Through the legal residency class, students reflect upon, and internalize, the legal and professional skills developed through their legal residencies. Students: establish learning goals for the semester; apply attorney-client confidentiality and privilege concepts; submit weekly time sheets; write regular reflections regarding their experiences; participate in discussion forums and workshops on professionalism topics; engage in self-evaluation; and complete a final reflective project.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated up to 4 times.

LSK 953 - Writing for Practice

Credits: 3

This course is designed to help second- and third-year students develop the kinds of writing, organization, critical thinking, editing and collaborative work skills essential to law practice and passing the bar. Students will work on multiple short (less than 5 pages) weekly assignments, engaging them in reading the law; conceptualizing, outlining, writing, editing, and revising legal documents; practicing writing concisely and clearly; researching and using samples, templates, and other practice-based resources; and working on related tasks. These assignments are designed to help students sharpen their ability to write any kind of legal document, using the appropriate format for the intended audience. The course will focus primarily on civil matters and will include some writing on criminal issues. The course's focus on essential skills, organization, analysis, doctrine, precision and conciseness, will transfer to writing in any legal setting.

LSK #955 - Defamation Law and Litigation

Credits: 2

This seminar will focus on media and defamation law, together with a significant clinical component. Each class includes student case presentations and discussion, as well as consideration of contemporary media cases such as the pending “Rolling Stone” lawsuit. Class participation is essential. Students will depose witnesses and draft pleadings. In lieu of a final exam, half the class will draft memoranda in support of summary judgment and the other half will draft opposing memos.