Criminal Law (LAW) (LCR)

LCR 905 - Criminal Law

Credits: 3

The course covers the concepts and topics typical of substantive criminal law courses. We investigate the elements that define crimes and defenses. We look at certain constitutional doctrines as bearing on the limits of legislative authority to define conduct as criminal. The course offers a good opportunity to practice the skills of statutory interpretation, and confronts students with the policy and ethical questions underlying choices and implementation about what conduct should be defined as criminal, and under what circumstances the law should recognize excuses or justifications for otherwise criminal conduct. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. Course format: lecture. This course is recommended for taking the bar exam. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.

LCR 906 - Criminal Procedure I: The Law of Criminal Investigation

Credits: 3

This course falls within the categories of constitutional law and criminal practice. It focuses on the Fourth , Fifth and Sixth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution, and investigates the constitutional regulation of police investigatory activity. Specifically, and although it may also cover other related topics, its principal focus relates to the law governing searches and seizures, and the law regulating police interrogation of suspects. Eligibility: Required JD course. Course format: lecture. This course is recommended for taking the bar exam. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.

LCR 907 - Criminal Procedure II: The Law of Criminal Adjudication

Credits: 2

This course familiarizes students with the Constitutional requirements of a fair criminal trial. Despite the name, students may take this course prior to completing Criminal Procedure I. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. Course enrollment is limited to 40 students. Course format: lecture. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course may be taken for an S/U grade.

LCR 914 - CyberCrime

Credits: 3

As society becomes more dependent on data and networks to operate our businesses, government, national defense and other critical functions, the risks posed by hacking, ‘malware’ and cyberattacks escalate. Although cybercrimes can be analogized to more traditional criminal law violations, the technology that offenders employ is very new, making hackers more elusive and the damage they cause often more widespread. Cybercrime examines both new and traditional laws that govern damage caused to or through networks, especially the Internet. With good preparation, good class attendance and constructive participation, students will gain the following: 1. an intermediate technical understanding of cyberattacks; 2. knowledge of conduct that is prohibited under security and privacy laws; and 3. an ability to critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of security laws and relevant case law. Cybercrime will provide students with a competitive advantage for practicing law in this cutting-edge field.

LCR 919 - International Criminal Law Seminar

Credits: 2

LCR 921 - Human Trafficking I

Credits: 3

This seminar will explore legal and social issues confronting both human trafficking survivors (foreign nationals and U.S. citizens) and law enforcement within the United States and globally. The seminar will begin with an overview of legal systems for prosecuting traffickers and legal systems affecting survivors of human trafficking, including international law, U.S. criminal, immigration law and labor law. The seminar will then be devoted to exploring advocacy efforts in the U.S. Congress and executive branch to date to hold traffickers accountable while providing assistance to victims of trafficking. In particular, the seminar will look at: U.S. Congress’ efforts to combat trafficking through the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, and executive branch action and federal appropriations funding to implement the Act. The class will also cover challenges to these efforts including inter-agency coordination, definitional issues and political and ideological cleavages within the broader anti-trafficking movement. The seminar will also focus on the Department of State's Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, the Department of Justice's efforts to prevent and prosecute human trafficking and protect the victims of trafficking, the Department of Labor's efforts to better document and deter trafficking and the Department of Health and Human Services efforts to provide services to victims of trafficking, especially children.

LCR 922 - International White Collar Crime

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the study of contemporary forms of white collar crime and its explanations, theories, and accounts along with its investigation, adjudication, and regulation. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. Prerequisites: Criminal Procedure I. Course enrollment is limited to 16 students. Course format: online. Grading: class prep. and participation, 50%; research paper, 50%. This course may be taken for an S/U grade.

LCR 923 - International Legal Research

Credits: 2

This course will introduce you to the standard sources used in foreign and international law as well as introduce you to tools and strategies needed to effectively research a relevant topic. An introductory lecture is coupled with a hands-on approach to explore sources of international law in print resources, subscription electronic sources including Lexis and Westlaw, and free internet tools. We will also discuss strategies and methods for finding foreign law. We will discuss research strategy and create research plans; living documents that can keep you on track and can serve as a way to evaluate your own progress. You will practice the skills you have learned to solidify the process and method of foreign and international legal research with a culminating project. There is no final exam but each student will create an annotated bibliography or research guide throughout the semester on an international legal topic of his/her own choosing (with the instructor's approval). You will meet with the instructor periodically to report on your research process and discuss obstacles and strategies. At the end of the semester, each student will then present the topic and their research strategy and process to the class. The final written research plan is also due the last day of class. Format: Online. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. Course may be taken on a S/U Basis. Grading: Regular submissions/quizzes 45; Research paper: 35; Class prep. and participation: 10; and, Other -- see syllabus: 10.

LCR 924 - International Criminal Law and Justice Seminar

Credits: 3

This is a research and writing seminar that satisfies the Upper Level Writing Requirement. This seminar is REQUIRED for all students seeking the LLM or Interdisciplinary Master's degree in International Criminal Law and Justice. Students will be required to conduct original research and writing, with multiple edits, on a topic to be agreed upon with the instructor. Students will present their research to the class. Eligibility: Open to all except 1Ls. REQUIRED for ALL students seeking the LLM or Masters in International Criminal Law and Justice. Course enrollment is limited to 14 students. Course format: writing. Grading: other (see syllabus), 100%. This course cannot be taken for an S/U grade.

LCR 925 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Credits: 3

Only a small portion of international criminal law disputes are resolved in some form of international court like the International Criminal Court or a special tribunal. The majority are instead resolved in a domestic court system, meaning that, effectively, the practice of international criminal law occurs in a number of different criminal justice systems. This course familiarizes students with the varieties of criminal justice systems around the world. Though each country or region has its own individual system tailored to its history and culture, regional and cultural similarities exist in the structure and approach of individual systems. The course will ground students in the major types of criminal justice systems around the world, from the Anglo-American system to a European system to an Islamic system. The course will look both at individual systems from countries that have a strong presence in the world of international criminal law and at the general principles that underlie the differences in major systems.

LCR 926 - International Criminal Court and Special Tribunals

Credits: 3

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the only permanent international mechanism for prosecuting international crimes. Though the scope of its jurisdiction is limited, it has had a powerful presence in the development of international criminal law principles. The special tribunals for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and for Rwanda (ICTR), both UN-created ad hoc tribunals, have played a significant role in the aftermath of two international crises. This course will ground students in the jurisdictional scope of the ICC; the substantive definition of crimes within its jurisdiction; its procedural rules and the substance and nature of its rulings. The course will also ground students in the practice, procedure of the ICTY and the ICTR.

LCR 927 - Piracy and Terrorism

Credits: 2

This course will explore the law and practice relating to crimes of terrorism and piracy. We will explore how states have come to define and prosecute these crimes and the subsequent implications for individual liberties, international norms, and the ever evolving role of the state in protecting national security. Course materials will include treaties, statutes, case law, historical essays, contemporary commentary and news articles, executive orders, and other works. We will cover various themes including: competing international and domestic definitions of the crimes of terrorism and piracy; the law governing states’ jurisdiction to prosecute such crimes; the nexus between terrorism and piracy and the laws of armed conflict—such as that governing detention, trials, and targeted killing; as well as the law governing surveillance for counter-terrorism purposes and the anti-piracy efforts of non-state actors. The course will focus on contemporary U.S. law and policy, but will also provide historical context.

LCR 928 - Drugs and Weapons Trafficking

Credits: 3

Weapons and drug trafficking are among the largest underground industries in the world. Generating hundreds of billions of dollars in annual revenue, and spawning a global industry of money laundering, trafficking has profound effects not only in the developing world but also in the well-established economies of Europe, Asia and North America. Trafficking leads also to a series of collateral social issues inclduding increased crime rates, profound societal effects and costs, rampant public corruption and large-scale funding of terrorist activities. This course familiarizes students with the origins and present state of international trafficking in weapons and drugs and the money laundering practices used to conceal it from detection. It includes an examination of how trafficking is conducted on a global scale, what efforts have been undertaken to combat it, and what the international community is doing to address the many complex issues involved. International standards and cross-cultural obstacles are examined, as are political implications. The course will examine the approaches to these problems used in countries that have a strong interest or participation in trafficking. In addition, international best practices and standards will be critically assessed.

LCR 929 - Capstone Research Project

Credits: 3

This course serves as the capstone to the process begun with the International Criminal Law Survey course. Students will complete a significant research and writing project on a subject of their choice under the supervision of a faculty member. The project will include a set of deadlines for outlines and drafts as well as frequent interaction with the Professor.

LCR 930 - Human Trafficking Laws: Criminal, Civil and Regulatory Process

Credits: 3

Forced labor is a crime that affects individuals around the world. This crime affects many different kinds of people in different situations, and as a result , the legal means for addressing human trafficking, and the implications of their use are varied. The course will provide practitioners with background, and information about the scope and breadth of legal tools to address different forms of human trafficking. This course is a follow-up to the Human Traffiking I. That course is a survey course broadly covering the field. This focuses on a particular area. In addition, we will be working with the Polaris Project, a major international non-profit advocacy group to offer webinars/online symposia to expand our visibility in this area.