Political Science (POLT)

https://cola.unh.edu/political-science

The study of political science includes the study of politics, power and governance, from local municipalities to other countries and the international system. Students study both formal and informal institutions of government, political behavior, civil society, the role of the media, individuals and the factors that shape policy. Political science clarifies political involvement and contributes to informed citizenship. The course of study is particularly valuable to students planning to enter local or national government, the Foreign Service, those who intend to study law and enter the legal profession, as well as careers in the security/intelligence sector. The major also enhances cognitive abilities, writing, public speaking and analytical skills that translate into careers in journalism, international organizations, public affairs and the private sector.

Internships and Advanced Study

In addition to the courses regularly offered, the department could have available selected topics, advanced study in political science and internships. Interested students should check the department's website to learn about the offerings for a given semester.

The department also offers several internship opportunities that give students experience in various aspects of government, policy making and the legal system at the local, state and national levels. Student must have taken certain course prerequisites for each kind of internship. In addition, students must have junior or senior standing and normally have a 3.2 average or higher to be eligible for consideration. Students desiring to undertake internships must fully comply with the departmental guidelines as stated on the application forms, which are available on the department website. Applications must be received by the first day of the preregistration period prior to the semester the course will be undertaken. Internships can only fulfill non-subfield requirements at the 500-level. Washington placements are made either through the Department of Political Science or through the Washington Center located in the National Student Exchange Office; major credit must be arranged through the department.

Political Science Language Requirement

The bachelor of arts degree at the University of New Hampshire requires that a student satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement. The requirement may be met by demonstrating language proficiency equal to a one-year college-level course (401 and 402, 403 and 503, or 503 and above in spoken language). See University Requirements/Degrees for the full description of this requirement.

The Department of Political Science does not allow American Sign Language (ASL) to count toward the language requirement.

Exceptions to this must be petitioned and approved by the Department of Political Science's undergraduate committee and a student's adviser.

Five-year B.A./M.A. Program

The five-year political science B.A./M.A. program (also known as a "dual degree, early admission" program) aims to

  1. improve opportunities for excellent undergraduates to prepare for competitive Ph.D. programs or add an additional credential before entering a competitive job market; and
  2. allow students interested in politics to advance and further specialize their political science education in only one additional year at UNH.

Students must fulfill all programmatic requirements for the current master's degree program, as well as fulfill all programmatic requirements for their bachelor's degree.

Interested students must submit a full graduate application by February 15 of their junior year. Minimum GPA required for admission is 3.2.

For additional information you may contact the graduate coordinator, Prof. Betsy Carter, (603) 862-4239, elizabeth.carter@unh.edu or Heather Austin, (603) 862-1767, heather.austin@unh.edu.

Political Science (POLT)

POLT 401 - Politics and Society

Credits: 4

Introduces the nature of politics and political institutions. Emphasizes political behavior and continuing issues of modern politics, such as power, authority, legitimacy, freedom, and order.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Equivalent(s): POLT 401H

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 402 - American Politics and Government

Credits: 4

Foundational course to help students understand the institutions and actors of American politics and government, the decision-making process of government, and the political considerations that drive American government.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

Equivalent(s): POLT 402H

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PS 402.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 403 - United States in World Affairs

Credits: 4

Introduces students to key concepts, actors, and events in U.S. foreign policy. After examining the early foundations of American foreign policy, this course concentrates on the United States' international engagement from the Cold War to the present. Students develop the analytical skills they need to form their own opinions on contemporary issues in U.S. foreign policy, and defend these opinions articulately based on a solid knowledge of historic and current events.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

Equivalent(s): POLT 403H, POLT #403W

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT #403W - United States in World Affairs

Credits: 4

Introduces students to key concepts, actors, and events in U.S. foreign policy. After examining the early foundations of American foreign policy, this course concentrates on the United States' international engagement from the Cold War to the present. Students develop the analytical skills they need to form their own opinions on contemporary issues in U.S. foreign policy, and defend these opinions articulately based on a solid knowledge of historic and current events. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): POLT 403, POLT 403H

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 407 - Law and Society

Credits: 4

Introduces the ways in which law operates in modern society: its forms, functions, underlying values, and the consequences of its application in particular regimes. Topics include the psychological bases for legal obligation, the evolution of particular legal doctrines, the philosophical underpinnings of legal responsibility, the relationship of law to social structures, the relationship of law to morality, the nature of legal reasoning, and critiques of law.

Equivalent(s): POLT 407H, PS 407

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 440A - Honors/Global Justice

Credits: 4

The course exposes students to different understandings of global justice and the institutions and approaches used to address genocide and mass human suffering. Students explore several modern conflicts and different cultural understandings of these conflicts and views on justice. The class also examines the political dynamics of international and domestic institutions, power politics, and international activism. Students also examine the globalization of accountability and post-conflict transitions from violence to peace.

Attributes: Honors course; World Cultures(Discovery)

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 444 - Politics and Policy in a Warming World

Credits: 4

Uses the issue of climate change to explore the relationships between scientific and technical research and debate, policymaking at the international and domestic (U.S.) levels, and public understanding and interpretation of complex technical issues. The course is interdisciplinary. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Environment,TechSociety(Disc); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 444B - Cruel and Unusual in a Federal System

Credits: 4

This course is an exploration of the US/state constitutional language of 'cruel and unusual' as an important limitation on governmental power. Students study its historical origins, interpretations, and applications across time periods and types of regimes. Particular attention will be paid to its association with the death penalty in the contemporary United States.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery); Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 500 - American Public Policy

Credits: 4

Foundational public policy course examining policy choices and conflicts, how policy decisions are made, how policies are assessed, the development of potential policy solutions, and the politics of policy making. Students engage in a task force project that simulates public policy processes and culminates in a policy recommendation at the end of the semester. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PS 500.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 502 - State and Local Government

Credits: 4

Examines power, policies, political culture, and constitutional settings of state and local governments in the United States. Students study how state legislatures, governors, courts, political parties, and interest groups interact to shape political outcomes at the state and local levels.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 504 - American Presidency

Credits: 4

The President as administrator, policy maker, and political leader. The relationship between the President and the public, the media, and other governmental institutions. Historical and constitutional background of the Presidency, role, and powers of the President in domestic and foreign affairs.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 505 - American Congress

Credits: 4

Role and powers of Congress as national lawmaker and check on the executive branch: committee structure, concepts of representation, legislative oversight and party cleavage, federal budget control, and foreign policy involvement.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 506 - Parties, Interest Groups, and Voters

Credits: 4

Role of political parties as organizers and managers of social conflict. Role of voters in controlling parties and government. Influence of interest groups in the electoral process and in governmental decision making.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 507 - Politics of Crime and Justice

Credits: 4

Criminal justice in theory and practice; contemporary role of police, prosecutors, judges, juries, counsel, and interest groups in the administration of criminal justice. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 508 - Supreme Court and the Constitution

Credits: 4

Supreme Court treated as a political institution whose historic mission is to decide all controversies arising under the Constitution between the nation and the states, the President and Congress; the role of the judiciary in defining its own powers, rights, and duties. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): PS 508

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 509 - Managing Bureaucracy in America

Credits: 4

Growth and development of the bureaucratic state. Roles and powers of administrative officials, decision making in bureaucratic settings, citizen participation, and the influence of interest groups on bureaucratic policymaking.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 510 - Media and Politics

Credits: 4

Contemporary review of media in politics; major roles of media today in providing news, setting public agenda, influencing public opinion; government regulations vs. media responsibility; future developments and consequences for American democracy.

Equivalent(s): POLT 610

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 512 - Public Opinion in American Politics

Credits: 4

Relationship of mass and elite opinion within the context of American political culture. Impact of public opinion on American governmental policies, especially with respect to major issues facing the President and Congress. Appraisal of responsiveness to influence and responsibility to lead.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery)

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 513 - Civil Rights and Liberties

Credits: 4

Analysis of four major areas of constitutional rights and liberties, political freedom, equal protection of the laws, and due process with particular attention to their impact on such problems as political protest, discrimination, school segregation, students' rights and the relationship between government and religion.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 520 - Politics, Justice, and Morality

Credits: 4

Origin of the idea of justice; relationship between politics, justice, and morality; selections from Plato, Aristotle, Roman, Islamic, and Christian political philosophers.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 521 - Rights and the Political Community

Credits: 4

Human rights and the quality of communities as expressed in Hobbes, Locke, Mandeville, Rousseau, and others.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 522 - Dissent and the Political Community

Credits: 4

Current political ideologies and controversies in America and abroad; liberal democracy and its critics since the 19th century.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 523 - American Political Thought

Credits: 4

Introduces the student to the key questions about politics and government asked and answered by American thinkers and actors, as well as the ways in which those "answers" have shaped our institutions and political processes. Emphasizes the idea of property. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): POLT 623

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 524 - Politics and Literature

Credits: 4

This course examines classical and contemporary works of literature to explore perennial issues in the study of politics, such as: exceptionalism, individualism, justice, and equality.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc)

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 524W - Politics and Literature

Credits: 4

This course examines classical and contemporary works of literature to explore perennial issues in the study of politics, such as: exceptionalism, individualism, justice, and equality. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Humanities(Disc); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 544 - Of Dictators and Democrats

Credits: 4

Why are some countries democratic, while others are ruled by dictators? This course answers this question by examining leading theories of democratization, then testing these theories empirically through case studies of ancient Greece, the United States, Germany, Chile, and South Africa. The course concludes with an overview of contemporary political change in the Middle East, and the potential for popular protest to culminate into democratic practices.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): POLT 644

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 545 - People and Politics in Asia

Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to Northeast Asia, with special emphasis on the politics of the region's major actors. Will China be the next global hegemon? Is Japan moribund? Is Taiwan an independent country? Is Hong Kong a democratic bastion? Why does Kim Jong-un keep threatening to attack the United States? This is a mid-level, writing intensive course that will prepare students for more advanced courses on the nations and issues of the Asia-Pacific rim.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 546 - Wealth and Politics in Asia

Credits: 4

Different paths to modernization, industrialization, and development in nations of the Asia-Pacific Rim. In-depth examinations of the challenges faced by Japan, China, Hong Kong/Macao, Taiwan, and the Koreas in their search for the correct path to economic growth and prosperity, with special emphasis on each nation's distinct society and history. Companion course to POLT 545, but either may be taken separately. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 548 - Drug Wars

Credits: 4

The Americas have hosted several wars against drugs, but these militarized campaigns have not curtailed the global consumption of opiates, cocaine, and cannabis. Perhaps even more sobering, the drug wars have coincided with spiraling rates of violent crime. Given this track record, policymakers have begun to reevaluate drug policies in the US and abroad. This course evaluates these contemporary changes, particularly in light of the successes and failures of past drug control policies.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 549 - The Politics of Markets

Credits: 4

This course surveys some major debates in comparative political economy, focusing especially on the creation, evolution, and reform of market institutions. The course emphasizes the ways in which the market is embedded in social and political institutions. Main topics include: 1) Theoretical foundations of political economy, 2) Patterns of industrialization, 3) Capitalist institutions in contemporary industrialized countries, 4) Challenges of development, 5) Transitions from communism to a market economy, and current challenges facing capitalism.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 550 - Comparative Government and Society

Credits: 4

Introduces students to key concepts and themes in comparative politics through the study of revolutions, ideologies, institutions, and/or social movements. This course compares interactions between citizens and their governments in various types of democracies as well as authoritarian regimes, and spans industrialized and developing countries.

Attributes: World Cultures(Discovery)

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 551 - Ethnicity ,Violence, Democracy

Credits: 4

What is ethnic identity and why do ethnic differences result in violence? Are diverse societies prone to conflict? The course provides a broad perspective to these questions by examining diversity and conflict in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Asia, Latin America and the US. Racial and ethnic politics in the US, while not a primary focus, are compared to identity and conflict in other countries. Students will understand how identity evolves and shapes the world.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 552 - Contemporary European Politics

Credits: 4

Analyzes politics, governments, and societies in contemporary Europe; focuses on basic characteristics of political life in different countries as well as pressing economic, political, and social issues.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT #554 - Revolution and Protest in Latin America

Credits: 4

Throughout Latin American history, economic and political models have been heavily contested. Advocates of state intervention in the economy have clashed with free market forces, and these clashes have often spilled into the political arena where they have been further complicated by divisions between dictators and democrats. This course examines these twin processes in Latin American politics, tracing economic and political development from the time of independence to the present. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 556 - Politics in China

Credits: 4

Dynamics of China's domestic political and economic policy processes - from massive starvation of the Great Leap Forward and the ideological upheavals of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution to the "Opening of China to the Outside World." Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT #558 - Government and Politics of Canada

Credits: 4

This course examines the political culture, partisan dynamics, political institutions and processes of modern Canada. Selected policy issues as well as U.S. - Canadian relations are also discussed. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 559 - Comparative Politics of the Middle East

Credits: 4

Examines the dynamics of political and economic change in states and societies of the Middle East. Covers state formation, nationalism and colonialism, authoritarianism and opposition movements, and the origins of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 560 - World Politics

Credits: 4

The course explores the primary issues of world politics with a focus on conflict, cooperation and development. Students are introduced to the principal theories and concepts in the analysis of world politics and encouraged to apply these theories and concepts to contemporary global issues. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Social Science (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT #561 - Introduction to International Political Economy

Credits: 4

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of economics; the course develops the relationships between political and economic policy and behavior in international affairs. A major focus is on the conflict between the primary values of the international economic system (efficiency and growth) and other societal and political values. Among the topics are: international trade and finance, economic and non-economic globalization, growth and human development, illicit trade, and economic governance.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 562 - Strategy and National Security Policy

Credits: 4

This course develops an understanding of: 1) strategy and its relationship to national security policy and 2) American national security issues and the process of creating and implementing American national security policies. A primary theoretical and practical consideration is the relationship between the use of force and diplomacy. Among the specific issues are: the nuclear world, the U.S. defense posture, military interventions, and the broadening definition of security.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 563 - The Global Information Grid's Disruptive Impact on Government, Politics, and Society

Credits: 4

Disruptive networking technologies, collectively called the Global Information Grid or GIG, are facilitating revolutionary changes in government, politics, and society. The course is designed to provide students with a framework for understanding and addressing issues that spring from the application of technology.

Equivalent(s): POLT 592B

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 565 - United States Policy in Latin America

Credits: 4

Frequently U.S. policymakers portray the United States as a benevolent neighbor, seeking to help the countries in their "backyard". Many Latin Americans disagree with this view, and think more critically about the motivations and legacies of U.S. intervention in the Western Hemisphere. To understand these disagreements, this course applies theories of international relations to analyze pivotal events in the history of U.S. - Latin American relations from the time of independence to the present, including Spanish-American War, creation of Panama Canal, Cuban Missile Crisis, Iran Contra Affair, War Against Drugs, Washington Consensus.

Equivalent(s): POLT 665

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 566 - Asian Challenge to Global Order

Credits: 4

Asian international relations continue to challenge global power structures. As the world's most vital region, Asia is characterized by explosive economic growth, diverse political systems, modernizing militaries, and advanced technologies. This course explores the regional political and economic dilemmas, starting with the breakdown of the old imperialist order, Japan's expansion, the Asian Cold War, Korean and Chinese unification, China's post-1978 emergence, North Korea nuclear weapons, and the growing conflict over the Pacific Ocean's marginal seas. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 568 - International Security

Credits: 4

Explores central issues related to security in international politics, including: intelligence collection, emerging technologies, the rise and fall of major interstate wars, nuclear weapons, climate change, terrorism, civil wars, and coercion. Prereq: POLT 403.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 569 - The Rise of China

Credits: 4

Analysis of China's struggle for political and economic power in Asia and the world. Examines the legacy of China's historical encounters with the outside world, interactions with the international system since 1949, domestic determinants of foreign political and economic policies, and theories of decision making. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): POLT 660

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 570 - Counterterrorism: Nation states' responses to terrorist activity

Credits: 4

This course explores nation states' responses to terrorism or "counterterrorism." Students learn to define terrorism and use models to understand responses. Case studies are used to highlight the challenges and successes resulting from different response strategies. Students analyze questions facing government counterterrorism decision makers. For example, what is the risk of a terrorist organization acquiring and detonating a nuclear weapon and what response could governments deliver following such an event?.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 580 - Selected Topics Am Politics

Credits: 4

Special topics such as politics and public affairs in New Hampshire, women in politics, and civil liberties. Not offered every semester. See departmental listings for semester offerings. Writing intensive. 4 cr.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Equivalent(s): POLT 600

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 584 - Selected Topics in Political Thought

Credits: 4

Special issues in political theory, such as liberalism and conservatism, radical political thought, the American character, and others. Not offered every semester. See departmental listings for semester offerings. Writing intensive. 4 cr.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): POLT 620

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 588 - Selected Topics in Comparative Politics

Credits: 4

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): POLT 651

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 592 - Selected Topics in International Politics

Credits: 4

Examines specialized issues in international politics. Topics may include ethnic conflict, non-proliferations and global security, economic and political globalization, etc. Not offered every semester. See departmental listings for semester offerings. Writing Intensive. 4 crs.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Equivalent(s): POLT 660

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 595 - Smart Politics

Credits: 4

An introduction to empirical research methods in political science, both qualitative and quantitative. Students study all aspects of the research process, including hypothesis-building, concepts and variables, measurement, research design, sampling, and empirical observations. Special attention paid to the use of statistical software. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery); Writing Intensive Course

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PS 595.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 602A - Internship

Credits: 4

Field experience in a governmental or nongovernmental organization at the local, state, national, or international level. Arrangements must be made through the political science department. Open to juniors and seniors with at least a 3.2 GPA. Permission of the undergraduate curriculum committee of the department is required prior to the internship.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 602B - Washington Center Internship

Credits: 4

A four-credit independent study designed to work in conjunction with the University's Washington Center Internship program. Requirements: major in political science. Junior or senior research component to be discussed with faculty sponsor. For details on the Washington Center Internship, please contact Paula DiNardo, Coordinator National Student Exchange and Washington Center Internships, 114 Hood House, 603-862-3485 (V/TTY 862-2607), email: paula.dinardo@unh.edu. Prereq: POLT 402.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 602C - Concord Internship Program

Credits: 12

Provides students with field experience in state government in Concord (State Senate, House of Representatives, Office of the Governor, etc.). Students will spend three days weekly in Concord and attend a weekly practicum in Durham. Open to juniors and seniors with a 3.2 or better GPA. Applications accepted in the fall semester and can be found on department's website. Permission required. Students may sign up any four (4) credit course along with 602C for a total of 16 credits. Cr/F.

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail Grading

POLT 602D - Internship

Credits: 2-12

Field experience in governmental or nongovernmental organization at the local, state, national, or international level. Arrangements must be made through the political science department. Open to juniors and seniors with at least 3.2 GPA. Permission from the undergraduate curriculum committee of the department is required. From 2 to 12 credits maybe taken. Cr/F.

Grade Mode: Credit/Fail Grading

POLT 695 - Independent Study

Credits: 2-4

Designed to meet special interests of students and instructors in exploring issues in political science. Upon satisfying eligibility requirements set forth by departmental guidelines (in departmental office and online), students must have the approval of a faculty sponsor. Students submit the form and all supporting evidence by mid-semester prior to the planned semester of independent study for departmental approval. Does not meet the major's four field-course requirement; maximum of eight (8) credits can be counted toward the non-field major requirements. Prereq: at least one upper-level course in field of independent study. Majors only.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 696 - Independent Study

Credits: 2-4

Designed to meet special interests of students and instructors in exploring issues in political science. Upon satisfying eligibility requirements set forth by departmental guidelines (in departmental office and online), students must have the approval of a faculty sponsor. Students submit the form and all supporting evidence by mid-semester prior to the planned semester of independent study for departmental approval. Does not meet the major's four field-course requirement; maximum of eight (8) credits can be counted toward the non-field major requirements. Prereq: at least one upper-level course in field of independent study. Only open to Political Science majors.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT #701 - Courts and Public Policy

Credits: 4

Impact of judicial decisions on public policy and influences on judicial decision making at the federal, state, and local levels. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 721 - Feminist Political Theory

Credits: 4

Familiarizes students with trends feminist political thinking; exploring issues of race, ethnicity, class, religion/spirituality, sexual orientation, ability, age as they relate to gender and the development of feminist political theory. Attention is paid to critical thinking and analysis using the paradigm of gender as a prism through which to view our lives and ideas.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 740 - States and Societies in the Middle East

Credits: 4

This seminar explores the comparative politics of selected countries and conflicts in the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. We focus on understanding the causes and consequences of popular uprisings, civil wars, and protracted conflicts. The class is taught through discussion, with students taking active, participatory roles. Themes include changing forms of governance, changing practices of warfare, gender and minority rights, economic and environmental problems, protest and activism, state-society relations, and migration and refugees. Students read memoir, journalistic accounts, and theoretical articles in comparative politics to understand important developments. Specific country and issue cases change each year; recent seminars have addressed Israel-Palestine, Syria, Egypt, Iran, and Iraq. Writing, reading, and discussion intensive class. Designed as follow-on course to POLT 559, Comparative Politics of the Middle East, counts as capstone course for the Middle East Minor. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 742 - Politics of Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India

Credits: 4

Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India are strategically important states and potential flashpoints of conflict. Nuclear neighbors, India and Pakistan have been in conflict for 70 years while Afghanistan remains internally unstable. The politics of these countries are also intimately involved with each other. The class will focus both on the internal politics of these states and their foreign relations with each other and the United States. Students will develop expertise in a crucial world region.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 748 - Food and Wine Politics

Credits: 4

Food and wine politics provides a lens through which to analyze contrasting perspectives on production organization, market structures, quality constructs, consumer preferences, and health and safety regulation. This course draws upon texts from economic history, political economy, economic sociology, and public policy to shed light on comparative political and market organization across Europe, the United States, and emerging market economies. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 750 - Politics of Poverty

Credits: 4

Why are some countries rich while others are so poor? This course answers this question by examining several theories of economic development: political culture, modernization, dependency, regime types, urban bias, rent-seeking institutions, and international aid. The immediate goal of this course is for students to understand the causes of international inequality in the distribution of wealth. Students also improve their ability to evaluate theoretical arguments and empirical evidence critically, and develop reading and writing skills. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Mutual Exclusion: No credit for students who have taken PS 750.

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 751 - Comparative Environmental Politics and Policy

Credits: 4

Environmental politics and policy across national boundaries and at different levels of governance. Comparison of the U.S. and European Union environmental policies to build a foundation for comparisons across national boundaries and sub-national authorities. Students improve their understanding of how and why comparative methods are used to gain insight into politics and policymaking. Central concepts and debates addressed include the roles of expertise, sustainability, precautionary principle, the use of market mechanisms in policy, environmental justice, policy devolution and flexibility, environmental performance assessment, NGO roles, activism, and social movements. Using a range of theoretical approaches and historical and contemporary events and case studies, evaluating the claims and explanatory power of various concepts and theories. Includes ethical issues emerging from the theory and practice of environmental politics. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 760 - Theories of International Relations

Credits: 4

Theoretical approaches of international politics, international organization, and international political economy with particular emphasis on systems theories, domestic determinants of foreign policy and theories of decision making. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 762 - International Political Economy

Credits: 4

This course has been designed to introduce advanced undergraduates and graduate students to the current theoretical discussions in international political economy. The course analyzes the development of current international economic regimes, as well as looks at systemic theories (interdependence, hegemonic stability), domestic determinants (bureaucratic, interest group), and decision-making theories (rational choice). By monitoring current economic and political news, students are challenged to apply these ideas to explain the current problems in political economy.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 765 - Security Intelligence Study

Credits: 4

The goal of the Security Intelligence Study course is to provide an opportunity for students to apply research and analysis models used by intelligence professionals to a real world problem. Using unclassified public sources, students research and present an analytical product to help limit risk for a government decision maker. Participants learn about and use publicly available data and intelligence analysis models. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 778 - International Organization

Credits: 4

This course is about cooperation at the international level. With a focus on international organizations, we examine what roles international institutions (both IGOS and NGOS) play in global governance and their effects in various issue areas. We examine their historical origins, functions, and the international and domestic political forces that impact their effectiveness. The course also considers the role of international organizations on world order including conflict resolution, peacekeeping, development, and human rights. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 795 - Advanced Study

Credits: 1-4

Senior POLT majors, with a cumulative average of 3.20 or greater, may undertake advanced study (political science), in an area of their choice, in consultation with member(s) of the faculty. Normally, the result of the project is a significant written product of a quality comparable to that done at the 700 course level. Student must initiate the project discussion and obtain approval of the undergraduate curriculum committee of the department before undertaking the project. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 796 - Advanced Study

Credits: 4

Senior POLT majors, with a cumulative average of 3.20 or greater, may undertake advanced study (political science), in an area of their choice, in consultation with member(s) of the faculty. Normally, the result of the project is a significant written product of a quality comparable to that done at the 700 course level. Student must initiate the project discussion and obtain approval of the undergraduate curriculum committee of the department before undertaking the project. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 797B - Seminar in American Politics

Credits: 4

Advanced analysis and individual research. Prereq: senior standing. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 797C - Seminar in Comparative Politics

Credits: 4

Advanced analysis focusing on government and politics in foreign nations or regions. Areas of interest may include: constitutional structures, political parties and interest groups, legislatures, bureaucracy, and public policy. Topics address such concerns as religion and politics, patterns of economic development, ethnic strife, and political leadership. Prereq: senior standing. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 797E - Seminar in International Politics

Credits: 4

Advanced analysis focusing on problems of theory and contemporary issues in international politics. Areas of interest may include: democratic norms in international relations, NATO expansion and European security, the peace process in the Middle East, etc. See department listings for semester offerings. Prereq: senior standing. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 797I - Seminar in Political Thought

Credits: 4

Advanced treatment and individual research. Prereq: senior or graduate standing. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 798B - Seminar in American Politics

Credits: 4

Advanced analysis and individual research. Prereq: senior standing. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT #798C - Seminar in Comparative Politics

Credits: 4

Advanced analysis focusing on government and politics in foreign nations or regions. Areas of interest may include constitutional structures, political parties and interest groups, legislatures, bureaucracy, and public policy. Topics address such concerns as religion and politics, patterns of economic development, ethnic strife, and political leadership. Prereq: senior standing. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading

POLT 799 - Honors Thesis

Credits: 4

Senior POLT honors-in-major students (see department for honors-in-major requirements), with a cumulative average of 3.20 or greater, may undertake a special honors project in an area of their choice. The result of this special project is a significant written product constituting an honors thesis, under the supervision of a faculty sponsor. Students must initiate the project discussion and obtain approval of the undergraduate curriculum committee before undertaking the project. The honors thesis constitutes the tenth course in the major. Writing intensive.

Attributes: Honors course; Writing Intensive Course

Grade Mode: Letter Grading